Do you get your vaccinations?

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Do you get your vaccinations?
10
Wed, 07-24-2013 - 4:28pm

I'm just curious if you get any vaccinations yourself now that you are an adult.  I had to get stitches last week, and updated my tetanus shot since I haven't had one since probably my 20s.  It also contained the pertussis vaccine.  Tetanus is not something I wanted to deal with, even though my cut was pretty clean.  

Do you keep vaccinations such as those up to date, or avoid all of them?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-13-2007
Thu, 07-25-2013 - 8:18am

I honestly cannot remember the last time I had a vaccination.  I'm guessing it was a flu shot, several years ago.  I'll have to ask about it next time I'm at the doctor- I have a physical scheduled in a few weeks- that will be a good time to check and see if I'm up to date or not! 

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Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Thu, 07-25-2013 - 12:18pm
I was up to date in my 20's, but have not had any at all since then and don't plan on it.
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Avatar for love.actually
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2005
Tue, 07-30-2013 - 3:30pm

Cmmelissa wrote:

I'm just curious if you get any vaccinations yourself now that you are an adult. I had to get stitches last week, and updated my tetanus shot since I haven't had one since probably my 20s. It also contained the pertussis vaccine. Tetanus is not something I wanted to deal with, even though my cut was pretty clean.

Do you keep vaccinations such as those up to date, or avoid all of them?

Yep, I absolutely keep up to date, especially with people not vaccinating. I wish I had the luxury of not vaccinating, but you know, I'd rather be alive than catch a preventable disease. I think it's a good thing you got the pertussis vax. It's highly contagious. I love the people who think they are above catching diseases, and thus don't vaccinate. Wonder who they're going to cry to when they come down with something. Either the doctors are with you or against you. I think if you don't get vaccinated against a preventable disease then you shouldn't be treated by a doctor. You made your choice by not vaccinating. Live with it.

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Wed, 07-31-2013 - 2:52pm

love.actually wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">Cmmelissa</em> wrote:</div></p><p>I'm just curious if you get any vaccinations yourself now that you are an adult. I had to get stitches last week, and updated my tetanus shot since I haven't had one since probably my 20s. It also contained the pertussis vaccine. Tetanus is not something I wanted to deal with, even though my cut was pretty clean.</p><p>Do you keep vaccinations such as those up to date, or avoid all of them?</p><p></blockquote></p><p>Yep, I absolutely keep up to date, especially with people not vaccinating. I wish I had the luxury of not vaccinating, but you know, I'd rather be alive than catch a preventable disease. I think it's a good thing you got the pertussis vax. It's highly contagious. I love the people who think they are above catching diseases, and thus don't vaccinate. Wonder who they're going to cry to when they come down with something. Either the doctors are with you or against you. I think if you don't get vaccinated against a preventable disease then you shouldn't be treated by a doctor. You made your choice by not vaccinating. Live with it.</p>

If you asked anyone who chose not to vaccinate I can almost guarentee you they would not say they were "above getting sick" from the illness they are not vaccinating for.  I assume you would make an acception that anyone who IS vaccinated that comes down with a vaccinated preventable disease or one who CAN'T for medical reasons would still be able to be treated by a doctor for those diseases.  Just because you don't get vaccinated doesn't mean you are preventing the disease.

My DD had pertusis as a toddler, no, she was not vaccinated for it.  My doctor knew she had not been vaccinated for it, and she had it for over about 6 weeks and had been into the doctor for both a well child visit and another visit related to a lingering cough.  It wasn't until the 3rd visit that they finally tested for it and gave her antibiotics, and she was already well on her way to being over it.  No one else in the family caught it, even though its considered "highly contagious".  Vaccinations don't mean immunity, yes, you can say they do, but since vaccinated people still get the disease even if they are vaccinated, its more that the affects of getting the disease are lessened.  Which also can be obtained through other means such as increased immunity in general for health purposes. 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Thu, 08-01-2013 - 1:37pm

Yes, my family doc makes sure we all keep up to date on vaccinations and boosters. I can't understand why anyone wouldn't get them.

Nancy
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-09-2010
Thu, 08-01-2013 - 1:40pm

I am going to agree with you. If you make a decision not to get vaccinated, then live with the consequences if you get the disease. In my opinion it is like playing with fire, don't cry when you get burned.

Nancy
Avatar for love.actually
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2005
Thu, 08-01-2013 - 2:38pm

Wow, that's some game of russian roulette you played with your kid. And of course you responsibly kept your child away from others during that 6 week period, especially when you brought her into the doctor's office. While you may not have gotten it, it *is* a highly contagious disease.

And, personally, I'd rather have the lessened disease than no vaccination. I don't have the same mentality as you, I guess. I know that if my kid caught a disease that was preventable and was sick or even died from it, I would know I was the one who caused that. Case in point: http://www.parentdish.com/2010/09/14/even-healthy-children-can-die-from-the-flu-parent-warns/

parentdish.com wrote:

PD: Did your other children get vaccinated that year?
JM: Yes. My other two boys, Ryan and Sean, who were 5 and 7 then, had gotten vaccinated, and neither of them got the flu that year. My husband and I did not get vaccinated, and we both got the flu that year. I tested positive when Ian died, and Glenn got sick two days later and received the news of his positive test results while we were at Ian's funeral.

PD: What's the most important thing you can tell parents?
JM: Protect your family and get vaccinated. It's the number one way to prevent the spread of the flu, and the flu can kill -- it can kill healthy children, and I think that's what's so scary.

Community Leader
Registered: 10-01-2010
Fri, 08-09-2013 - 5:25pm

I haven't been vaccinated since I was a child, and won't. I never get the flu shot. I recently turned down the tetanus shot and the ER doctor agreed it was best, in my case.

My first son, who was super allergic, had a serious reaction to his baby needles - high-pitched screaming, 105 F temp and convulsions. But no one told me it was serious, they told me it was normal.

So I got my second son his needles as well. Then I started researching and realized how risky the vaccinations were for my children - and that I had been lucky their reactions were not life-threatening, although it is possible there was some minor brain damage as a result.

But I breathed a sign of relief because they were into their teens, had finished all of their needles and survived.

Then I got pregnant again. My youngest son was violently allergic - to everything. He couldn't even eat solid food till he was 18 months old, and still it was not his main source of nutrition till he was 4.5 years old.

My family doctor said, with our history, it was too risky to get him vaccinated. So we didn't.

When my oldest son had his own child, his wife insisted on getting the baby vaccinated. That night they rushed the baby to the hospital, not breathing. Now my grandon has a legal letter from the Ministry of Health that he cannot be vaccinated - ever.

When I told the ER doctor of our history, and my concerns about a reaction, he agreed that there was a very good chance that I would react - and it could be deadly. I don't want to die from a possible case of lockjaw, but I don't want to die from a vaccination either.

It's a hard place to be, and I do not make my choice lightly.

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Mon, 08-12-2013 - 11:29am

love.actually wrote:
<p>Wow, that's some game of russian roulette you played with your kid. And of course you responsibly kept your child away from others during that 6 week period, especially when you brought her into the doctor's office. While you may not have gotten it, it *is* a highly contagious disease.</p><p>And, personally, I'd rather have the lessened disease than no vaccination. I don't have the same mentality as you, I guess. I know that if my kid caught a disease that was preventable and was sick or even died from it, I would know I was the one who caused that. Case in point: <a href="http://www.parentdish.com/2010/09/14/even-healthy-children-can-die-from-the-flu-parent-warns/" rel="nofollow"><span>http://www.parentdish.com/2010/09/14/even-healthy-children-can-die-from-the-flu-parent-warns/</span></a></p><p><span><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">parentdish.com</em> wrote:</div></span></p><p><strong>PD: </strong><strong>Did your other children get vaccinated that year?</strong><br /><strong>JM: </strong><span style="color:#464646; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Yes. My other two boys, Ryan and Sean, who were 5 and 7 then, had gotten vaccinated, and neither of them got the flu that year. My husband and I did not get vaccinated, and we both got the flu that year. I tested positive when Ian died, and Glenn got sick two days later and received the news of his positive test results while we were at Ian's funeral.</span><br /><br /><strong>PD: </strong><strong>What's the most important thing you can tell parents?</strong><br /><strong>JM: </strong><span style="color:#464646; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Protect your family and get vaccinated. It's the number one way to prevent the </span><a href="http://www.google.org/flutrends/intl/en_us/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">spread of the flu</a><span style="color:#464646; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">, and the flu can kill -- it can kill healthy children, and I think that's what's so scary.</span></p><p><span style="color:#464646; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"></span></blockquote></p>

Its going to depend on your family history, as witch_power said in her post.  I personally know, from my DH's family history as well TONS of research, that I would easily be playing russian roulette by getting my kids vaccinated.  That's the problem with other people looking at your decisions and making their own opinions, they don't know what your family history is, they don't know how much you have been through or researched before you made your decisions whether to vaccinate or not vaccinate.  I don't feel the need to go into my DH's family history as to why we have decided not to vaccinate, its not anyone's business, but I personally don't go around judging others or telling them they are playing russian roulette with their kids' lives with their decisons, I respect that they made an educated decision and did what they felt more comfortable with.  My decisions are based on the best thing for MY kids, period.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2011
Thu, 08-29-2013 - 4:24pm
I get a flu shot every year and got my tetanus booster a couple of years ago. As to people not getting their kids or themselves vaccinated, I completely understand if there is a history of severe reactions/allergies. Any other reason, nope, I don't get it.