Eve, Mendelsohn books you mentioned

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Registered: 03-27-2003
Eve, Mendelsohn books you mentioned
5
Tue, 09-02-2003 - 9:08am
You, at one time metioned two books that Robert Mendelsohn wrote, Male Practice and Confessions of a Medical Heretic. Have you read either of them? Just curious, you seem to have a strong opinion of them and I was wondering if it was based on anything of substance.

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Registered: 03-25-2003
Tue, 09-02-2003 - 10:31pm
Dina - I have not read the Male Practice book and have read various excerpts and quotes from the Medical Heretic book - even picked it up at a bookstore once and read the first dozen pages or so. I honestly don't think I'd make it through either book in its entirety without vomiting. The guy actually advises parents to LIE about a child's temperature - to "command more attention from the doctor" by telling the doctor a child's temperature is very high (104 or 105 F). Yes, I suppose you could say that I do have a strong opinion about his books but can't say that I would waste my time actually reading them cover to cover. It really didn't take much to give me the impression that Mendelsohn appears, for some reason, to be very bitter (aside from being quite outdated too).

Eve

 
 
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 09-03-2003 - 12:05am
ah Eve, once again we disagree. I am thoroughly enjoying his books, and despite that they were published well over 20 years ago, I find that he was ahead of time and that what he says still can apply to parents and patients today.
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Wed, 09-03-2003 - 2:02pm
Outdated? LOL! Quite the contrary, imo. Mendelson raised issues years ago that were considered "radical" or "bitter" then, but are now common knowledge/widely acknowledged in the medical profession and by researchers, like the dangers involved in the overuse of antibiotics, hospitilization/iatrogenic morbidity and mortality, otc and prescription drugs, mercury in vaccines, waning immunity in the vaccinated placing adults and infants at greater risks, the general harmlessness of fever and its vital immune function, unneccesary treatment of ear infections, and the systematic exploitation of women by the medical model (anyone else see the recent coverage on hysterectomy rates, estimates that 90% or so are not medically indicated, and the profit motive/indifference to more complicated alternatives behind the rates? Not a coincidence that the top 2 most frequently performed (and the most cited as often medically unneccessary) surgeries, hysterectomy and c-section, involve the female reproductive system, imo.)

I have read How to Raise a Healthy Child and Confessions (cover to cover) but have not yet come across the Malepractice volume. I'll have to look for it.

His How to is an excellent book, providing accurate information for parents on what does and does not constitute cause for concern and how to protect your child from the risks of medical intervention (to avoid such intervention unless it is actually indicated and how to minimize the risks of indicated interventions.)

He evidenced a great respect, imo, for the valid uses of medical science and those who provide them. He did not, however, look favorably upon the abuses and misuses of medical science, and was not afraid to point them out, or to let the lay public in on what he had learned from his years "inside the system."

His Heretic book is likewise informative and full of factual points, though heavier on the "political" perspective. I may not agree with all of his personal beliefs on religion/politics, may place a slightly different interpretation on some of the points, but I was able to make it through the book quite easily without "vomiting", lol! (I have a lot of practice, since I regularly read material I find nauseating in my research on vaccines;) But it is important to read everything to get a well balanced perspective, imo.

JMHO, Kimberly
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Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 09-03-2003 - 3:15pm
>>I have read How to Raise a Healthy Child and Confessions (cover to cover) but have not yet come across the Malepractice volume. I'll have to look for it.<<

Malepractice is what is termed "out of print". I picked up my copy on Amazon a few weeks ago for like $11.00. It is a used copy but in very good shape.

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Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 09-03-2003 - 9:29pm
I found "How to Raise . . ." interesting, and some of it made a lot of sense. However I had some concerns about advice he gave, one example being his recommendation to avoid treating strep throat. Strep is incredibly painful, and it certainly CAN become dangerous, even if the risk is not as great as commonly believed. He may well be right that it will usually go away on its own, but all we have is his word on that. And antibiotic treatment does work. There are very few references in the book to support his claims -- a big problem for me. He also says children under 4 "don't get rheumatic fever" -- I am very suspicious of statements like this.

I do understand fears of over-using and mis-using antibiotics, and I completely agree with him that there are many parents who drag their kids to the doctor unneccessarily at the first sign of a minor sore throat. I also appreciate his advice on what to look for regarding bacterial vs viral infection. But my opinion is that true strep needs to be treated, and a very sore throat accompanied by fever should be looked at by a doctor, regardless of the presence of the "triad." So, although some of his advice is common-sense, I do not trust the more controversial recommendations without some confirmation of its validity.

As always, I try to take what I read with a grain of salt (preferable accompanied by a large margarita, LOL) And I do try to maintain an open mind, but as the saying goes -- not so open that my brain falls out . . . boy, guess I'm a real comedian tonight :-)

Keeley