Hep A Vaccine .. why?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Hep A Vaccine .. why?
36
Mon, 08-17-2009 - 11:55am

Our Feb 2009 PG was discussing vaccines .. someone mentioned Hep A -- which reminded me that I want to know WHY we vaccinate children 12-24 moths against it?!? We have safe drinking water supplies .. the stats I found said there are approx 7000 Hep A infections in this country every year and 50 deaths. It's hardly even a percentage of the population that can be calculated .. 2.278655 × 10^-5 %

I was vaccinated against Hep A when traveling in Africa .. and got the booster when I traveled in Guatemala .. both places where I would consider such a vaccine to be warranted -- but for my baby, in the US?!

Does anyone have articles / links for me on this one?? Why did "we" add this vaccine to the schedule (besides having another vaccine to make money off.. )




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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Mon, 08-17-2009 - 9:01pm

Why did "we" add this vaccine to the schedule (besides having another vaccine to make money off.. )


ding ding ding.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Mon, 08-17-2009 - 9:39pm

reading on hep a-


http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress/vaccine-efficacy-how-often-do-vaccines-work/hepatitis-a-2/


Hepatitis A

Our analysis of Hepatitis A


Who is at risk?


CDC’s Pink Book hepatitis a chapter


Manufacturer’s Inserts and efficacy statements:
Havrix- efficacy ranges between 60-94%


On the CDC’s FAQ page for Hep A:



In children aged <6 years, 70% of infections are asymptomatic; if illness does occur, it is typically not accompanied by jaundice. Among older children and adults, infection is typically symptomatic, with jaundice occurring in >70% of patients.



Unlike hepatitis B and hepatitis C, hepatitis A causes no long-term liver damage and usually does not cause death. There is no chronic carrier state with hepatitis A. Having had the disease produces lifelong immunity from future hepatitis A infection.


This statement by Robert Kennedy found in the transcript of a vaccine hearing before the Committee on Government Reform (House of Representatives) is pretty clear on the infant/Hepatitis issue.



Two specific vaccines come to mind, hepatitis A and hepatitis B. I will not go into a long-winded scientific process and simply state that the chance of an infant or child getting either hepatitis A or hepatitis B is close to none or nonexistent. When the potential for exposure does exist, those risk factors are easily identified. Even more disturbing is that hepatitis A causes a self-limiting infection and does not cause chronic disease. It is my opinion that parents should be made aware of the risks and benefits of each vaccine where the chance for infection during infancy is minimal to nonexistent.


Dr. Kennedy is a professor of microbiology and immunology and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center as well as a research scientist.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Mon, 08-17-2009 - 11:55pm

more reading. same site, different page.


http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress/2008/02/26/why-jab-children-to-protect-adults/


Why Jab Children to Protect Adults?
February 26, 2008 by generic
Filed under: Vaccine/Disease Analysis

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Tue, 08-18-2009 - 12:43am
I want to know WHY we vaccinate children 12-24 moths against it?!? We have safe drinking water supplies .. the stats I found said there are approx 7000 Hep A infections in this country every year and 50 deaths. It's hardly even a percentage of the population that can be calculated .. 2.278655 × 10^-5 %

I was vaccinated against Hep A when traveling in Africa .. and got the booster when I traveled in Guatemala .. both places where I would consider such a vaccine to be warranted -- but for my baby, in the US?!


Heck, this same argument can be made for many of the vaccines on the schedule right now. Why did you choose this one?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Tue, 08-18-2009 - 1:27am


Oh it was just a question that came up b/c of a conversation in my PG. This isn't the only vaccine that I question actually needing. My problem comes up b/c my DH spent some years doing vaccine research in an academic setting (no pharma, here!).. and is now in medical school. His work was mainly with AIDs vaccine / smallpox vaccine and flu vaccine. But, of course, he has full confidence in our vaccine program and the clinical trials / FDA / CDC. I would probably be more inclined to limit / forgo vaccines altogether if it weren't for him.. so we've agreed, I can delay our son's vaccines, as long as he gets them, eventually.

I see no reason to have the Hep A vaccine, unless traveling to a developing country .. which I could see doing .. but I would vaccinate at that time .. not now. I honestly don't see a need for the varicella vaccine at all -- I have big issues with that one.

I think a lot of the conflict I have is that I have done all of my traveling in developing countries, where these diseases are still very active -- I've even had myself "boostered" .. against polio, TDaP and Hep A .. I've had titers checked for MMR and I've been vaccinated against typhoid fever, etc ..

Maybe what it comes down to is that I don't want the government telling me what to inject my child with and when ..




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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Tue, 08-18-2009 - 2:41am
If I were travelling abroad to countries where these diseases were endemic I would be more apt to vaccinate at that time, as well.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2004
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 6:28pm

This vaccine is definitely not necessary. In Dr. Sears vaccine book, he says the disease itself is mild, self-limiting, and many people actually have had it (have the antibodies) and not even known they had it. I got it before we went to Puerto Rico, and to be honest and not PC, I think the only reason it's recommended here now is because of the influx of illegal aliens from Mexico (and not from just Mexico, but from all the other Central American and South American countries where the disease is rampant). Potentially you could get it if your eating at a restaurant and the cook isn't very sanitary with his hygiene and hence, your food. YUCK! It can also be spread around daycare centers when the caretakers don't wash their hands between changing babies diapers.

The vaccine contains 250mcg of aluminum in some brands, and formaldehyde in others.

    Apraxia Awareness
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 08-19-2009 - 8:38pm
The disease is mild in children, not in adults. Adults that are exposed that do not have immunity can have some rather unpleasant symptoms.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2004
Thu, 08-20-2009 - 7:28am
As compared to some diseases, I would consider diarrhea for a few weeks (usually max) a fairly mild disease. Point is, it's not a deadly disease.
    Apraxia Awareness
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Thu, 08-20-2009 - 2:36pm
Actually Hep A can be deadly.

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