The History of Man and Disease

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
The History of Man and Disease
2
Thu, 11-19-2009 - 10:38am

First, I'd like to say that I welcome the active discussion that is occurring. It's been far too long that this board has been dormant. What seems to happen, over and over (at least since I've been posting here) is that some in the provaccine camp like to activate a guilt by association campaign and stereotype every person that asks a reasonable question about our current practice of vaccinating every child from the day they are born... then two months later, then two months later, then two months later, then six months later, then six to eight months later, and so on. There are reasonable and logical questions, and I think we ask them here. We don't all put our tin foil hats on, wrap our houses in copper mesh to block big brother, and go outside in plastic bags because we are afraid of chemtrails.

HOWEVER, I'm growing very tired of the provaccine camp acting as if those questioning the current protocol don't understand history, etc... This accusation was made in a thread below, and I think it deserves its own. You want to talk about history? Let's do that, starting from an appropriate time period - BEFORE the Industrial Revolution and BEFORE Agriculture (in all of its perverted forms) gripped this Earth and refused to let it go.

Fossil records show a sharp decline in the health of our species as soon as we began to farm... these slow, subtle changes afforded bacteria the time it needed to evolve and become opportunistic. Cyclical viruses took more of a hold on its hosts and began to cull the herd that grew weak because of its domestication practices. Don't put vaccines in the knight and shining armor light as if nothing that occurred prior to their development had any bearing on the outcomes that are so commonly used to espouse our paranoia and 'detachment from reality'.

Keep it ALL in perspective please, that's all I ask.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-06-2009
Thu, 11-19-2009 - 11:07am

Jamie,


"Fossil records show a sharp decline in the health of our species as soon as we began to farm... these slow, subtle changes afforded bacteria the time it needed to evolve and become opportunistic. Cyclical viruses took more of a hold on its hosts and began to cull the herd that grew weak because of its domestication practices. Don't put vaccines in the knight and shining armor light as if nothing that occurred prior to their development had any bearing on the outcomes that are so commonly used to espouse our paranoia and 'detachment from reality'."


I trust you will be able to back up that assertion with some factual citations?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Thu, 11-19-2009 - 1:50pm

<<>>

What is the definition of domestication? I'm sorry Jon, but you have evidenced my point with your own citations - I think you're just trying to pick a fight because of my interpretation of available evidence...to which I am entitled. Hunter-gatherer populations began to lure prey animals to water holes and began to domesticate (ie. procreation, farming, etc...) this is indisputable. The inception of agriculture has been deleterious on a number of levels, and this is looking aside the fact that the majority of foods that are harvested via monocultural farming are foods that have been around for a really, really short period of time. It is certainly plausible that some of these activities gave rise to susceptibility in certain generations of people.

Any archaeological educational website, or library, can lay to rest any question you might have over the difference between ancient and modern humans, but you don't appear to be confused. Are you really denying the health changes that occurred from the Paleolithic to Neolithic Era? Or, are you saying that this decrease in overall robustness of our species had no effect on susceptibility?

malnutrition + domestication = sick people

The fact that life span was definitely shorter for ancient humans brings to mind a number of circumstances that have been escaped by our sedentary lifestyles that include bathing in artificial light virtually 24-7. Circumstances such as going to the grocery store and buying food in nice, neat, wasteful packages, and meats that have been farmed and packaged so you won't get 'germs' on your hands... if you had to actually hunt the food you nourished your body with, then the common cold becomes an entirely different threat.

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