HPV Vaccine

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-20-2007
HPV Vaccine
13
Wed, 01-14-2009 - 4:44pm

So i just wanted to see some opinions on this vaccine. I personally don't see this actually preventing it all but may help some (won't know for a few years yet ) -


Human papillomavirus vaccine (GARDASIL)

Advice from the Therapeutic Goods Administration


Updated 4 July 2008



  • Australia is one of the first countries to roll out a massive cervical cancer immunisation campaign designed to protect young women from the strains of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) that cause 70% of cervical cancers. Over 26 million doses of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil) have been distributed worldwide, including 3.7 million in Australia.
  • The benefits of the vaccine will be substantial. Four out of five people will be exposed to HPV during their lifetime. Exposure from a single lifetime partner can still be enough to result in an infection that can lead to cervical cancer. Vaccination with HPV vaccine is most effective when it is given to females before they are likely to be exposed to HPV.
  • There are over 700 new cases of cervical cancer reported each year in Australia (725 cases diagnosed in 2003), and by the age of 75, there is a risk of contracting this condition of 1 in 191. Cervical cancer resulted in the deaths of 216 people in 2005 and has a five year survival rate of around 74.6%.
  • No vaccine is completely without side effects, but the diseases they prevent are far more harmful than the effects that can sometimes follow immunisation.
  • Adverse events following immunisations are carefully monitored in Australia and regularly reviewed by expert advisory groups. A total of 1013 suspected adverse events following injections of Gardasil have been reported in Australia to June 27, 2008. All have been assessed by an expert committee and in many cases also assessed by local authorities in States and Territories. The great majority are mild and common problems such as soreness, swelling, redness or other reaction at the injection site (mentioned in 203 reports; 20% of reports). Other commonly reported reactions have included headache (202; 20%), dizziness (156; 15%), nausea (164 reports; 16%) and vomiting (70; 6.9%). A significant volume of reporting of adverse events is often seen after a new, widely-used vaccine is introduced because of the higher degree of vigilance and lack of familiarity with a new product. Many of the events that are reported (such as headache, feeling dizzy or unwell) may be equally common in people of the same age who have not received the vaccine.
  • In studies which compared the safety of the vaccine with placebo, large numbers of clinical study participants were given Gardasil. The results of these studies were considered in detail by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) before the vaccine was approved for use in Australia. This detailed information not unexpectedly showed some small increases in the rates of local and systemic adverse events with active vaccine compared with placebo and these are set out in the Gardasil product information document.
  • The overall level of reporting for Gardasil, following the distribution of approximately 3.7 million doses in Australia, is very low and consistent with that for other new vaccines and rates reported from other countries. Worldwide, over 26 million doses have been distributed. With this number of people receiving the vaccine, even if all healthy and young, some serious events can be expected within days or hours of vaccination by chance alone but not related to vaccination.
  • In Australia, all adverse events reported following Gardasil vaccination are reviewed every 6 weeks by an expert committee, the Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC), which advises the TGA. Every six months, detailed reports of adverse events are published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence, a quarterly publication of the Department of Health and Ageing. No deaths occurring after Gardasil have been reported in Australia and no deaths directly linked to the vaccine have been reported in the USA or Europe.
  • An important category of possible reactions to any vaccine or one of its components is allergy. Severe allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, may require adrenaline injections or other treatment, so the possibility of allergic reaction, although rare, is the reason why all persons providing vaccines must have the necessary drugs and equipment to treat them. To date, there have been 12 reports of anaphylaxis and 91 reports of urticarial reactions (hives) in Australia following Gardasil. The current estimated rate of anaphylaxis based on doses given in Australia is 3.2 per million. The rates for other vaccines given to children and adolescents range from 0 to 3.5 per million doses in international studies.1 Reports of suspected anaphylaxis following HPV vaccination have been assessed by ADRAC using the Brighton Collaboration definition, a relatively new set of criteria for defining anaphylaxis.2 Anaphylaxis is a rare event but healthcare professionals and patients should be aware of its possible occurrence. The occurrence of anaphylaxis and allergic reactions is not predictable and can occur in anyone regardless of whether they have a previous history of allergy or not. All such cases reported to the TGA to date have either been treated appropriately or have resolved without treatment. The rare occurrence of allergic reactions with Gardasil does not change any recommendations regarding the vaccine, but it is important that such reactions are reported promptly by the treating doctor to the State or Territory Health Department or directly to the TGA, as set out in the Immunisation Handbook.
  • If a patient does experience an allergic reaction or other significant adverse effect they should consult their doctor, who may consider referral to a State vaccination coordination clinic before giving further vaccinations with Gardasil. The TGA continues to be in contact with international authorities to monitor the occurrence of any serious events related to the use of Gardasil anywhere in the world. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) have also both assessed Gardasil as being safe and effective.
  • The product information for Gardasil has been updated since the vaccine was first marketed to reflect the accumulating clinical experience, but neither the TGA nor other regulatory agencies have considered any further regulatory action is required at this time. The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) reviewed the safety of Gardasil at its meeting on 4
girls

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Wed, 01-14-2009 - 10:04pm

The testing with Gardasil was against a placebo which contained the same amount of aluminum as the vaccine. There was a small group (about 300) who received an inert placebo. This group was separated out of the larger group when considering minor reactions, but blended in when considering serious reactions. The amount of aluminum in this particular vaccine is substantial.

A couple of other points. Most people who are exposed to HPV can clear it with no problems. People can frequently clear it over and over again with no problems. So the obvious question is, what are the host factors which prevent clearing this infection? Rather than vaxing everyone, finding the host factors and preventing the virus from "sticking" would make more sense. Anyway, the point is that most people are not in danger from HPV, whether they get the vaccine or don't get the vaccine.

One of my major concerns with this vaccine is what is called serotype replacement. If the vaccine knocks out a couple of the virulent types, what is to prevent a couple of currently non-virulent varieties from moving in and taking over the empty terrain? And will these non-virulent varieties stay that way? Who knows? This has happened with other vaccines (see Hib).

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 12:34am

As much as I'm all for vaccinating children .. I think I would be reluctant to use the HPV vaccine on my own daughters (If I had them! ;)) .. there's just not enough research to support its effectiveness, yet. Better to teach children safe sex practices. Not to mention the excessive cost of this vaccine and the fact that not all ins. covers the vax.. I believe this was a huge problem in Texas when they tried to mandate the vaccine for all 6th graders, or something like that?? (I'm flying blind here .. I really haven't done very much reading about this one!!)

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Agreed. Though I will admit to not knowing very much about this vaccine, as it is. Just enough to know that I wouldn't get it myself, nor would I subject every young girl to it, either.



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Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-20-2007
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 1:14am

Grade 8 is when they get it here in Australia ( age 13). That's another thing that is different to the US is that all vax schedule vaccines are free. Rich or poor everyone gets it for free.


(Unless a new vaccine comes in and you want it for your child but it isnt on there vax schedule you have to pay for it i think, will have to check)

girls ttcamangelttc09 babydustmanPhotobucket
girls
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 1:59am

You should do a search for HPV on this board. There's been a lot of good information posted. It's hard to find how many died or were paralyzed as reported by the CDC. VAERS has a small sample of course but information putting vaccines in a less than positive light is information you really have to dig for.

I believe there is one article here that tells about one of the many side effects of Guardasil - warts.

Then there's some 100 strains of HPV out there but the shot only protect against like 4...just guessing, I don't remember the exact numbers but it gives the patient a false sense of security. Anyone remember?

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:08am
Our government agencies make it free to the poor over here too, I don't know where that poster got the idea that it was about cost for anti-vax parents. It's not, it's about logic. Most people have insurance so they only pay a small fee (mine is $15) for what is called "well-visits" where children are scheduled (per the CDC's advice) to get vaccinated every so many weeks. The people who make the decisions about when, how often, and how many boosters kids get...they are allowed to hold stock in the companies effected by their decisions.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:11am
What's the rate of Autism in Austrailia anyway? Anything like 1 in 150 or 1 in every 95?
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:14am
When I hear about these new and wonderful shots and drugs coming out I think about daytime tv. I'm a sahm so I get to watch all the daytime tv and commercials. I don't know how it is other places but in the mornings here we have lots of the local lawyers with their commercials and they are often attached to the class action suits against all these different makers of different drugs that have now killed people. When I was in high school it became very popular to get the depo bc shot and now I see commercials everyday for people to join up in the lawsuits because people are dying from those shots. NONE of these drugs and shots are old enough nor have they been tested enough for people to be trusting them the way they do. I think it says a lot that even Melissa has said she wouldn't give it to her daughter.
DH and I have said already that we'd put money on the fact that in less than 5 years I'll be seeing those lawsuit commercials for all these new shots and pills that are being advertised like crazy right now.
Photobucket Thanks to Andie for my siggy!



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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:21am
ITA!
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-20-2007
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:43am

Reports show the number of people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis in various parts of Australia. The reports provide prevalence and incidence data. The different types of data cannot be compared directly.


The detailed age distribution of diagnoses provides the means to calculate a ratio of the number of ASD diagnoses relative to the number of births for a region. This metric estimates the number of people in the population who have ASD. The current diagnosis rates in all regions of the country suggest that around 1% of Australians will be diagnosed with an ASD. ASD is life-long and can be severely disabling so this level of ASD imposes a substantial burden on the community.


The age distribution of diagnoses can be further used to estimate for planning purposes the number of people with an ASD diagnosis (including Asperger’s syndrome) at important transitions, such as the how many students diagnosed with ASD enter primary or secondary school.

girls
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
In reply to: mummyto2babes
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 9:37am

Just want to point out that vaccines are never free.

The parent pays.

or

The government pays, which means the taxpayer pays.

or

The company donates the vaccines (occasionally), which means that the stockholders pay.

There isn't anything which is really free unless you wander out into nature and pick berries growing wild. And then there is the effort of picking the berries, the cost of a bucket to put them into, the water to wash them...

Stuff costs.

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