Hypothetical "What would you do?"

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Hypothetical "What would you do?"
163
Wed, 09-09-2009 - 5:53pm

This question is for those parents that have chosen not to vaccinate based on information they have read on the interwebz.

What would you do if your child caught and died or was permanently disabled from a disease that they were supposed to be vaccinated against early in life?

Who would you blame? Would you try to sue someone?

I'm not trying to flame anyone for their choices, but I've always wondered this "what if". Just as I'm free to choose to vax my child, everyone else is free to not to.

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Avatar for suschi
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 9:37am

Yes, we are trained to believe that a fever must be reduced, fever bad, must go away.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 3:53pm
It's always helpful in debate to not use acronyms considering with diseases, one acronym can mean multiple things. GBS for one.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 3:59pm
Duly noted, albeit, I don't make any promises, but will try - I am rather fond of them - and use them continuously on a daily basis. Perhaps next time, should such

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-27-2005
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 7:33pm

when debating vaccines, acronoyms associated with said vaccines is totally appropriate to use.

 

Tracy - wife to Ron since 9/9/03, mom to college sophomore, Jason (18), high school Junior Chase
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Mon, 09-14-2009 - 9:15pm

<>

Or Breast Milk if we're talking FF! :) hehehe ... Group B Strep would have also never entered my mind while discussing vaccines. This is a relatively common bacteria, usually colonizing the rectum or vagina. It becomes a problem during labor and delivery if the neonate is infected .. or it can cause problems if a person is immune compromised. Like many bacteria -- it is opportunistic and will only be able to "take over" if the host is otherwise compromised.




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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 4:21am

Actually, acronyms can be confusing in the vaccine example because both Group B Strep and the other one I forgot the name of and couldn't spell it, anyway, are both diseases. Through context clues, one could determine if a person was talking about a bowel movement vs a birth mother and forward facing vs formula feeding.

I said "Group B Strep" rather than just GBS, so had the person I was replying to been reading my entire posts, she would have known I was not referring to guillain barre syndrome.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 4:31am

Regardless of what diseases we think of when we think of vaccines, when a poster introduces a disease into a debate, it's best not to use acronyms because it can cause confusion.

An anthrax vaccine doesn't come to mind when thinking about children's vaccines either.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-17-2007
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 6:54am

Guillain-Barre Syndrome: From NIH

What is Guillain-Barré Syndrome?

Guillain-Barré syndrome is a disorder in which the body's immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system. The first symptoms of this disorder include varying degrees of weakness or tingling sensations in the legs. In many instances, the weakness and abnormal sensations spread to the arms and upper body. These symptoms can increase in intensity until the muscles cannot be used at all and the patient is almost totally paralyzed. In these cases, the disorder is life-threatening and is considered a medical emergency. The patient is often put on a respirator to assist with breathing. Most patients, however, recover from even the most severe cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome, although some continue to have some degree of weakness. Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare. Usually Guillain-Barré occurs a few days or weeks after the patient has had symptoms of a respiratory or gastrointestinal viral infection. Occasionally, surgery or vaccinations will trigger the syndrome. The disorder can develop over the course of hours or days, or it may take up to 3 to 4 weeks. No one yet knows why Guillain-Barré strikes some people and not others or what sets the disease in motion. What scientists do know is that the body's immune system begins to attack the body itself, causing what is known as an autoimmune disease. Guillain-Barré is called a syndrome rather than a disease because it is not clear that a specific disease-causing agent is involved. Reflexes such as knee jerks are usually lost. Because the signals traveling along the nerve are slower, a nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test can give a doctor clues to aid the diagnosis. The cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the spinal cord and brain contains more protein than usual, so a physician may decide to perform a spinal tap.
Is there any treatment?

There is no known cure for Guillain-Barré syndrome, but therapies can lessen the severity of the illness and accelerate the recovery in most patients. There are also a number of ways to treat the complications of the disease. Currently, plasmapheresis and high-dose immunoglobulin therapy are used. Plasmapheresis seems to reduce the severity and duration of the Guillain-Barré episode. In high-dose immunoglobulin therapy, doctors give intravenous injections of the proteins that in small quantities, the immune system uses naturally to attack invading organism. Investigators have found that giving high doses of these immunoglobulins, derived from a pool of thousands of normal donors, to Guillain-Barré patients can lessen the immune attack on the nervous system. The most critical part of the treatment for this syndrome consists of keeping the patient's body functioning during recovery of the nervous system. This can sometimes require placing the patient on a respirator, a heart monitor, or other machines that assist body function.
What is the prognosis?

Guillain-Barré syndrome can be a devastating disorder because of its sudden and unexpected onset. Most people reach the stage of greatest weakness within the first 2 weeks after symptoms appear, and by the third week of the illness 90 percent of all patients are at their weakest. The recovery period may be as little as a few weeks or as long as a few years. About 30 percent of those with Guillain-Barré still have a residual weakness after 3 years. About 3 percent may suffer a relapse of muscle weakness and tingling sensations many years after the initial attack.
What research is being done?

Scientists are concentrating on finding new treatments and refining existing ones. Scientists are also looking at the workings of the immune system to find which cells are responsible for beginning and carrying out the attack on the nervous system. The fact that so many cases of Guillain-Barré begin after a viral or bacterial infection suggests that certain characteristics of some viruses and bacteria may activate the immune system inappropriately. Investigators are searching for those characteristics. Neurological scientists, immunologists, virologists, and pharmacologists are all working collaboratively to learn how to prevent this disorder and to make better therapies available when it strikes.

*Halfway down the first paragraph, it says surgery or vaccinations can trigger it....
Now i'm wondering Whats next in the interest science, oops i mean pharma?? a vaccine to counter-act the reaction from a different vaccine?

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 12:45pm
I think that's where the confusion came in.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Tue, 09-15-2009 - 12:55pm

Well, the below statement is not true, as I read all your posts - which is why I was so confused. I never heard of Group Strep, and as stated prior, Guillian Barre Syndrome is a well known documented disease developed from vaccinations, which is what I was talking about. Therefore, when you began bringing in (whom I think you were referring about my daughter, not sure, you just said "she") having Group Strep, I was utterly confused.


Not a biggie - it's over.

Rands

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