This is irritating...

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
This is irritating...
46
Fri, 01-23-2009 - 1:39am

I was flipping through one of the random free parenting type magazines that I have gotten in the mail in the last year and a half. (I'm sure from all those free diaper and formula forms I filled out back when dd was born) The one I was looking at was "Parents". I usually don't like it very much as most of the items they recommend are pretty pricey and their views on hot topics are usually very far from my own. This particular issue had a bunch of stuff about vaccines. I've seen these things before and been put off by how pro sided they are. I looked at their website and am just so effin peeved right now.

Here's one article:
http://www.parents.com/baby/health/autism/health-update-more-proof-that-vaccines-dont-cause-autism/

Here's a nice little nugget from that one:
<"But if you choose not to vaccinate your child, you are increasing his risk of contracting serious diseases that can lead to complications, hospitalization, and even death," says Dr. Fombonne. For example, after the MMR vaccine was first linked to autism in England, many parents stopped vaccinating their children -- and several children died during a measles outbreak in Ireland soon afterward.

For all the major childhood vaccinations (hepatitis B, rotavirus, DTaP, Hib, pneumococcal, polio, flu, MMR, chickenpox, hepatitis A, meningococcal), most experts agree that the many, many benefits from getting vaccinated far outweigh any possible side effects or risks.>

Here's another:
http://www.parents.com/baby/health/vaccinations/hows-and-whys-of-baby-vaccines/?page=1

Loved this (in regards to an alternate schedule):
"Sounds good in theory. But it's actually playing Russian roulette with your baby's health. "When you delay vaccines, you increase the period of time during which children are susceptible to diseases vaccines can prevent," Dr. Offit says. "Certain diseases -- like Hib, pneumococcus, and pertussis -- rear their head in the first year of life, so you need to immunize infants as quickly as possible."

Talk about scare tactics:
"Is it ever preferable for my child to get the natural disease?

No. The diseases we vaccinate children against can have serious consequences. Many parents today have had chickenpox. They recovered uneventfully, perhaps sustaining just a few scars from the pox.

But some children don't pull through quite so easily. In some cases, chickenpox can make children susceptible to infection and cause pneumonia. "

I also love that it talks about being careful when reading scary stuff about vaccines on the internet and tells it's readers to only believe the cdc or aap. Then it goes on to use more scare tactics pushing the vaccines.

I'm just peeved that this info can be in such a wide spread publication and be so one sided.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Tue, 01-27-2009 - 10:59pm

your baby could die from the chickenpox if you don't get the vaccine!"


And this is wrong how? Chicken pox has had several reported fatalities. Why is a nurse disclosing this info wrong? Is it not her job to take your childs health seriously?


Albini: Vaccinating, Breastfeeding, AP, No CIOing & Tatooed Married

              *Praying for my best friend, my Dad*


 &n

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Wed, 01-28-2009 - 12:14am

I believe she was referring to the scare tactic used in which they only tell you that your child could die from chicken pox without the vaccination and neglect to tell you what the vaccination could do or what the actual statistics are for the children with uncompromised immune systems who die from chicken pox. Another question is Do these kids actually die from chicken pox? Most likely the answer is no. They die from a secondary illness. There are many of us who feel that an uncompromised immune system is better equipped to fight off the primary illness without falling victim to a secondary.

No one is saying that these illnesses never cause complications or death. What antivaxers want is a fair portrayal of the facts.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Wed, 01-28-2009 - 8:51am

With an illness like chickenpox, the process of approving the vaccine has to include more than a simple consideration of whether the illness ever killed anyone. With chickenpox, deaths are pretty rare. Therefore, the effectiveness and safety and long-term effects of the vaccine need to be carefully considered. The U.S. is one of the only countries in the world to add the varicella vaccine to their routine schedule. To me, this indicates that other countries have weighed the costs and benefits and decided that the vaccine didn't make it.

Some of the problems with the chickenpox vaccine:

it can actually give children chickenpox

the immunity wanes, requiring additional boosters and of course, each additional booster increases the risk of adverse reactions to the vaccine

it can push the age of chickenpox into the teens or adulthood, where it becomes a much more dangerous illness

it can cause shingles in children

it will increase the rate of shingles in adults: here is an explanation of how this works
http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress/2008/03/20/eradicate-chickenpox-sure-why-not/

there is no evidence that adding this vaccine to the schedule will result in a net reduction of deaths or suffering

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2007
Wed, 01-28-2009 - 6:03pm

The measles data and incident rate in Ireland in 2001 is incorrect too. At the end of 2001 measles vaccination rates had dropped to 68% with a reported incidence of 1600 cases and 3 fatalities. That is less than 2/10 of a percent for the amount of infections; really clinically insufficient to relate to lack of vaccination.

Interesting to note although the rate of autism is 1 in 150 here in the US, in Ireland it's 1 in 56. No wonder the MMR rate dropped to 68% after Wakefield's study was published. People were terrified.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Wed, 01-28-2009 - 8:06pm
I wonder what is going on in Ireland to make the rate so incredibly high?
http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-20-2007
Thu, 01-29-2009 - 8:04am

The U.S. is one of the only countries in the world to add the varicella vaccine to their routine schedule. To me, this indicates that other countries have weighed the costs and benefits and decided that the vaccine didn't make it.


Australia has it on there vax schedules.

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girls
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Thu, 01-29-2009 - 8:55am
Okay, that makes two countries. Anyone else? I know that Norway, which ranks at the top or close to the top for child health doesn't use this vaccine.
http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-14-2005
Thu, 01-29-2009 - 2:40pm

On the Canadian schedule also at 12 months (http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/im/is-cv/index-eng.php#a)

Talks of adding a booster to the schedule now also.






iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Thu, 01-29-2009 - 8:05pm

The U.K. has been debating this vaccine for several years.

Frankly, the U.S. experience hasn't been all that great. Small children coming down with shingles, for example. Outbreaks of chickenpox in vaccinated populations. The need for a booster.

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2007
Tue, 02-03-2009 - 1:06pm

I have a theory that as Ireland is a coastal nation we have a high consumption of seafood in our diet. I know I grew up eating fresh fish at least twice a week; Mondays was always fish cake day (hated it too yuck). There also could be a genetic link that makes the celtic population prone to autism, such as with celiac disease and cystic fibrosis and hemachromatosis (all more common in Irish/Celtic populations). Add in the environmental triggers and you have a loaded gun.

There is also a huge rate of chromosonal abnormalities in the coastal stretch that is 75 miles from Sellafield, a nuclear power plant on the West coat of Britain. Basically Ireland is swimming in other nations' filth, albeit invisible, but it's there.