measles outbreaks ARE unvaccinated

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
measles outbreaks ARE unvaccinated
50
Tue, 12-23-2008 - 8:55pm

skip to main | skip to sidebar






An Autism blog that discusses discrimination and factions within the Autism community. This blog has grown to cover mostly environmental issues that affect our ever-growing population of children with altered GI and Immune systems. Why is this happening to 1 out of every 6 of our kids? Copyright, Ashley Morgan









Thursday, August 21, 2008

Vaccine Refusals Fuel Measles Outbreak

REUTERS

Vaccine refusals fuel measles outbreak

Parents refusing to have their children vaccinated against measles have helped drive cases of the illness to their worst levels in a dozen years in the United States, health officials reported on Thursday.

In 2008 alone, 131 cases of measles have been reported, with 15 serious enough to be hospitalized, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

Most of those infected were not vaccinated and there is no reason for any cases to occur when vaccines can prevent them, the CDC said in a weekly report on death and diseases.

"Measles can be a severe, life-threatening illness" the CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat said in a statement. "These cases resulted primarily from failure to vaccinate, many because of philosophical or religious belief."

Only 13 percent of the cases were imported, the CDC said, naming Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, India, Israel, China, Germany, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Russia. "This is the lowest percentage of imported measles cases since 1996," the CDC report reads.

At least 15 patients, including four children younger than 15, were hospitalized, although no one has died, the CDC said.

"In the decade before the measles vaccination program began, an estimated 3 to 4 million persons in the United States were infected each year. Of these, 400 to 500 died, 48,000 were hospitalized, and another 1,000 developed chronic disability from measles encephalitis."

Encephalitis is a life-threatening inflammation of the brain that can be caused by viral infections such as measles.

More than 90 percent of the patients were not vaccinated, the CDC said, had no evidence of having been vaccinated, or were babies too young to have been vaccinated.

"Of the 95 patients eligible for vaccination, 63 were unvaccinated because of their or their parents' philosophical or religious beliefs," the CDC said.

Some religious groups refuse vaccination but many parents have fears that vaccines are unsafe or may cause conditions such as autism -- fears the CDC says are unfounded.

"Increases in the proportion of the population declining vaccination for themselves or their children might lead to large-scale outbreaks in the United States," the CDC said.

Outbreaks of measles are being reported now in Israel, Switzerland, Austria, Italy and Britain among people who are declining the vaccine.

British health officials said in June that measles had again become endemic for the first time since the mid-1990s due to parents declining to get their children vaccinated.

The last serious U.S. outbreak was in 1989-1991, when 55,000 people got measles and 123 died. The CDC said 55 cases of measles were reported in 2006.

Measles kills about 250,000 people a year globally, mostly children in poor nations. The disease causes fever, coughing, irritation of the eyes and a rash. Serious complications include encephalitis and pneumonia that can be fatal.

"Measles knows no borders, but can be prevented for less than one dollar per child in a developing country. We must be steadfast in our efforts to reduce measles cases globally," the Measles Initiative, which includes the American Red Cross, CDC and United Nations agencies, said in a statement.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox; Editing by Michael Kahn)

Copyright © 2008 Reuters Limited.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 11:31am
the hospital pays for nosocomial infections. insurance does not reimburse anymore, which is why you will see less patients receiving urinary catheters upon admission and shorter amounts of time being intubated, etc. :)


Photobucket





Photobucket




Photobucket











Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


Photobucket






Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 12:11pm
If one of my family needed medical intervention that was actually neccessary we would use the money that we've saved not throwing it away to insurance that is unnecessary in our case since we are all healthy and do not run to the dr for every sneeze.
Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 1:43pm
No it is not I can guarantee you if we stopped vaccinating for these diseases there WOULD be a resurgence. But remain in denial that it is all the living standards.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 1:47pm

There are many instances where vaccinated people contract the very disease in which they've been vaccinated against.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 1:49pm
What are you going to do when you yourself gets older - I guess expect your children to pay for your medical care since you don't have any insurance?
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 2:01pm

I am fully aware that I won't have as many medical expenses as someone like you because myself and my family have not compromised our immune systems with the junk the cdc has you brainwashed to believe you need nor do we drug ourselves up at every sign of a germ.

I love how you turned it around to portray me as a drain on my kids. Brilliant.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2004
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 2:22pm
What perplexes me most about this article is that the CDC is going to basically slam parents who don't vaccinate just because there were 153 cases of measles last year.
    Apraxia Awareness
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 2:36pm

If one of my family needed medical intervention that was actually neccessary we would use the money that we've saved not throwing it away to insurance that is unnecessary in our case since we are all healthy and do not run to the dr for every sneeze.

.. I don't run to the doctor for any sneeze (I believe you're probably exaggerating here, anyway) .. in fact, I can't tell you the last time I visited a doctor -- pregnancy and prenatal appointments aside .. but you can't really say that insurance is a complete waste of money. What about the case of chronic illness / disease where people require expensive medications on a monthly basis? -- is homeowner's insurance a waste, what if your house burns down? There are certain things that are outside of our control -- even people who try to do everything right in their lives and be healthy cannot guarantee their good health -- Accidents are called accidents because they weren't planned / expected or intended to happen .. However, if you've saved enough money to cover unforeseen medical expenses, I congratulate you and hope that you never need it. :)



Photobucket





Photobucket




Photobucket











Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


Photobucket






Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 3:05pm

Ins mo prem - $498
Yrly total - $5976

Dr visit co - $30
visit to walk in clinic w/out ins - $20

well baby care - $50 visit
knowing my child is growing and is a normal healthy baby - free

hospital - 30% after deductible
So, after paying 6 grand a year I'd still have to pay IF we needed it.

I understand there are people with chronic diseases that require constant dr visits and hospitalization. We are lucky enough to not be one of them. I think that some people aren't good at saving for unforseen things of any kind. In some instances it CAN be a plus to have some help with insurance but most ways you look at it the insurance companies are raping people and we don't feel the need to be one of them.

BTW, I'm not exagerrating very much. IRL, I know dozens of people that take their kids to the dr every time they have a runny nose, cough, or fever. I didn't say that YOU did but going on what I know IRL it's not an exageration to say that I don't take my kid to the dr for every sniffle.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-2008
Sun, 12-28-2008 - 4:52pm

I have had 4 ambulance rides and none of them cost anywhere close to 5K.

Photobucket