measles outbreaks ARE unvaccinated

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2008
measles outbreaks ARE unvaccinated
50
Tue, 12-23-2008 - 8:55pm

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An Autism blog that discusses discrimination and factions within the Autism community. This blog has grown to cover mostly environmental issues that affect our ever-growing population of children with altered GI and Immune systems. Why is this happening to 1 out of every 6 of our kids? Copyright, Ashley Morgan









Thursday, August 21, 2008

Vaccine Refusals Fuel Measles Outbreak

REUTERS

Vaccine refusals fuel measles outbreak

Parents refusing to have their children vaccinated against measles have helped drive cases of the illness to their worst levels in a dozen years in the United States, health officials reported on Thursday.

In 2008 alone, 131 cases of measles have been reported, with 15 serious enough to be hospitalized, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

Most of those infected were not vaccinated and there is no reason for any cases to occur when vaccines can prevent them, the CDC said in a weekly report on death and diseases.

"Measles can be a severe, life-threatening illness" the CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat said in a statement. "These cases resulted primarily from failure to vaccinate, many because of philosophical or religious belief."

Only 13 percent of the cases were imported, the CDC said, naming Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, India, Israel, China, Germany, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Russia. "This is the lowest percentage of imported measles cases since 1996," the CDC report reads.

At least 15 patients, including four children younger than 15, were hospitalized, although no one has died, the CDC said.

"In the decade before the measles vaccination program began, an estimated 3 to 4 million persons in the United States were infected each year. Of these, 400 to 500 died, 48,000 were hospitalized, and another 1,000 developed chronic disability from measles encephalitis."

Encephalitis is a life-threatening inflammation of the brain that can be caused by viral infections such as measles.

More than 90 percent of the patients were not vaccinated, the CDC said, had no evidence of having been vaccinated, or were babies too young to have been vaccinated.

"Of the 95 patients eligible for vaccination, 63 were unvaccinated because of their or their parents' philosophical or religious beliefs," the CDC said.

Some religious groups refuse vaccination but many parents have fears that vaccines are unsafe or may cause conditions such as autism -- fears the CDC says are unfounded.

"Increases in the proportion of the population declining vaccination for themselves or their children might lead to large-scale outbreaks in the United States," the CDC said.

Outbreaks of measles are being reported now in Israel, Switzerland, Austria, Italy and Britain among people who are declining the vaccine.

British health officials said in June that measles had again become endemic for the first time since the mid-1990s due to parents declining to get their children vaccinated.

The last serious U.S. outbreak was in 1989-1991, when 55,000 people got measles and 123 died. The CDC said 55 cases of measles were reported in 2006.

Measles kills about 250,000 people a year globally, mostly children in poor nations. The disease causes fever, coughing, irritation of the eyes and a rash. Serious complications include encephalitis and pneumonia that can be fatal.

"Measles knows no borders, but can be prevented for less than one dollar per child in a developing country. We must be steadfast in our efforts to reduce measles cases globally," the Measles Initiative, which includes the American Red Cross, CDC and United Nations agencies, said in a statement.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox; Editing by Michael Kahn)

Copyright © 2008 Reuters Limited.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 2:17am
I don't think you understand why you found this on the site you did. Parents of autistic children who blame vaccines are desperate for the drug companies and the cdc to reform the system and the shots. Many feel that outbreaks will make them (the drug companies) take a closer look at their products(vaccines).
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Avatar for suschi
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 9:42am

Here are the key words from the info you posted:

{{{ Measles kills about 250,000 people a year globally, mostly children in poor nations. }}}

You need to understand, measles isn't the problem here, it's the overall state of lving that is killing these people, if it wasn't measles that killed them, it would have been any other infection, flu etc....


If you're questioning vaccines or not vaccinating at all, stop by the Non-Vaccine Support Board that I proudly host: http://messageboards.ivillage.com/iv-ppnonvaccine


“Never attribute to conspiracy


that which can be explained by greed and incompetence”


But never assume that the greedy and incompetent,


-- through stupidity or willful ignorance --


are not unknowingly part of a deeper conspiracy.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 10:54am
You need to understand, measles isn't the problem here, it's the overall state of lving that is killing these people, if it wasn't measles that killed them, it would have been any other infection, flu etc....



..or the level of medical care made available to people in developing nations .. which tends to be pretty limited. In the US, if you are suffering complications from measles, influenza, etc. you are hospitalized where you can receive care under the supervision of highly trained and specialized experts. I guess you can count your lucky stars that you live in a country where these services are available, should they become necessary to save a child who could have been saved by being vaccinated. :)



I just hope all these moms who choose not to vaccinate have their own private health insurance .. I'd rather not be paying for the consequences of a (in my opinion) poor decision when those unvaccinated children have complications and end up hospitalized, receiving even more medical interventions and drugs with far more likely / serious side effects than a little MMR vaccine! JMHO!


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Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 11:10am

So, should those medically contraindicated also have their own private health insurance? What about those that do vaccinate and then in turn require life long care for their child(ren) due to a severe AE - should they be required to have their own private medical insurance? And what about those that just don't get fake immunity from vaccines and catch it anyway - should they be required to get their own private insurance? Your argument is ridiculous.


Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 1:54pm
Well, to be honest, I feel we should all be paying something for our health insurance .. :) But that is another debate!


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Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Wed, 12-24-2008 - 4:25pm

I most definitely agree, and I can sit here and list at least 100 items of interest - but as you said, that's another debate, though I think in most cases, we're likely to agree.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-27-2005
Thu, 12-25-2008 - 7:44pm

that's very interesting, considering up until that article, all the articles that I read stated that "nearly half were unvaccinated."


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26333787/


http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2008-08-21-measles_N.htm


(links posted so that I won't be asked for sources)


So, by deduction, if NEARLY half were unvaccinated (which isn't altogether

 

Tracy - wife to Ron since 9/9/03, mom to college sophomore, Jason (18), high school Junior Chase
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-09-2007
Thu, 12-25-2008 - 11:21pm

I choose not to vaccinate. My family also has no medical insurance by choice. We can absolutely afford it. We choose not to. I'd rather my child contract a disease naturally if he's going to get it than take my chances letting some mindwasher inject who knows what into their body.

I love the backhanded concern that provaxers pretend to have for unvaccinated kids.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Sat, 12-27-2008 - 6:11pm

I choose not to vaccinate. My family also has no medical insurance by choice. We can absolutely afford it.

... So if your or one of your children has to be hospitalized for any reason and requires surgery or expensive medical intervention, I assume you can afford paying for it out of pocket? An ambulance ride alone can run somewhere in the neighborhood of about $5k.. You are very fortunate, nothing wrong with not having insurance, as long as you can pay for the care that is required when the time comes. :)



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Lilypie Expecting a baby Ticker


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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Sat, 12-27-2008 - 11:31pm

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