Media Coverage MMR/Autism - Pediatrics

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Media Coverage MMR/Autism - Pediatrics
5
Fri, 05-30-2008 - 10:14am

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/121/4/e836?etoc


Media Coverage of the Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine and Autism Controversy and Its Relationship to MMR Immunization Rates in the United States

Michael J. Smith, MDa,b, Susan S. Ellenberg, PhDb, Louis M. Bell, MDa,c and David M. Rubin, MD, MSCEb,c



a Divisions of Infectious Diseases
c General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
b Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this work was to assess the association between media coverage of the MMR-autism controversy and MMR immunization in the United States.

METHODS. The public-use files of the National Immunization Survey were used to estimate annual MMR coverage from 1995 to 2004. The primary outcome was selective measles-mumps-rubella nonreceipt, that is, those children who received all childhood immunizations except MMR. Media coverage was measured by using LexisNexis, a comprehensive database of national and local news media. Factors associated with MMR nonreceipt were identified by using a logistic regression model.

RESULTS. Selective MMR nonreceipt, occurring in as few as 0.77% of children in the 1995 cohort, rose to 2.1% in the 2000 National Immunization Survey. Children included in the 2000 National Immunization Survey were born when the putative link between MMR and autism surfaced in the medical literature but before any significant media attention occurred. Selective nonreceipt was more prevalent in private practices and unrelated to family characteristics. MMR nonreceipt returned to baseline before sustained media coverage of the MMR-autism story began.

CONCLUSIONS. There was a significant increase in selective MMR nonreceipt that was temporally associated with the publication of the original scientific literature, suggesting a link between MMR and autism, which preceded media coverage of the MMR-autism controversy. This finding suggests a limited influence of mainstream media on MMR immunization in the United States.


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*** There are several other new releases in ScienceDirect, Nature etc... that relate to vaccine uptake and parental comprehension of vaccine policy and use.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-30-2007
Fri, 05-30-2008 - 1:49pm
ITA!
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Fri, 05-30-2008 - 2:55pm

One thing that will move things along is that, before, you actually needed a long-term study to convince people that there is a link. Now, people just listen to real people telling the true reality of their own autistic children. Hearsay spreads much faster among the masses than does scientific articles.

The media has the majority control though. The thing is, just like with politics, certain media must pick a side in lieu of being objectionable and fair. Its too bad money has that great an influence over society but it seems it's controlling every aspect of it using the media as it's vehicle.

I do realize that some children with autistic tendencies did not receive vaccines but if there are THAT many out there I would suspect that the media would have found them and we would be hearing from them (and about them) more often. (Sorry Judi, I figured I should add that so my point wouldn't get lost.)

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2008
Tue, 06-03-2008 - 5:26pm

Anti-vax stuff has been addressed in this publication and others because of the hysteria leashed upon society.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Wed, 06-04-2008 - 8:59am

Anti-vax stuff has been addressed in this publication and others because of the hysteria leashed upon society.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-03-2008
Wed, 06-04-2008 - 9:23am

I guess both sides are?