Mercury and Chelation

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Mercury and Chelation
26
Wed, 01-21-2009 - 9:18pm

I'm curious about your thoughts on this? Do you think that thimerosal is responsible, at least in part, for developmental conditions (notably autism)?

Many people that believe their children are mercury poisoned are using chelating agents to remove the residual metals from peripheral tissues and the brain and have reported that their children are better. Is this wrong? Is it right?

I ask, because apparently, the FDA has pulled DMSA - which actually has been used for a very long time to remove metals etc... and has been proven effective in animal models.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Fri, 01-30-2009 - 1:56pm
Your friend sounds pretty wise... :-)
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Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Fri, 01-30-2009 - 2:12pm

This is what gets me about the difference in approches (although it would seem the collaboration should be on an overall cure and who cares who's right and who's wrong, but..)


Instance #1:


Every biomedical intervention, he wrote, “is supported by anecdotes and personal testimonies: it is understandable that parents want to share their experience that their child has made progress, and it is equally understandable that other parents are impressed by success stories.”


Dr. Fitzpatrick continued, “When parents have invested money, time, energy and, above all, hope into a particular treatment, it is natural to seek to attribute any improvement to that treatment.” But, he added, anecdotal examples and wishful thinking are not science.


***In this particular example, alternative methods deemed effective via anecdotal examples, is considered "non-scientific", no matter how many say their child has been cured (or is making dramatic improvements).****


But, instance #2:


The one approach that has been scientifically validated to help, though by no means cure, autistic children is behavioral intervention that mimics the way normal children learn, Dr. Schreibman said. For example, if the child wants to play with a toy car, the therapist holds it and prompts the child to say “car.” If the child makes the “c” sound, he is given the car to play with. The next session may require him to say “car.”


***In this particular example, "help" but not cure, by a child saying "car" or making the "c" sound, is not considered anecdotal, but is considered science?

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Fri, 02-06-2009 - 5:02pm
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Mon, 02-09-2009 - 9:15am

Sure.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 02-09-2009 - 12:19pm

"Hypocrisy may not even be the most appropriate word but I'm at a loss right now at what is."

They ain't invented the "appropriate" word for it yet.

:)

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-03-2006
Wed, 02-11-2009 - 4:23pm

Chelation is a tricky process. DMSA is a chelator but does not cross the Blood Brain Barrier, so it cannot pull metals from the brain. A lot of people add ALA(alpha lipoic acid) as it does cross the BBB, and pulls metals from the brain. Never chelate with amalgmas in your mouth, they must be removed from your or a child's mouth. The IOAMT has a protocol for amalgam removal, which includes a rubber dam, suction, nasal passages blocked, etc.


I reccomend reading up on what Andrew Cutler says about chelation. www.noamalgam.com. He believes in chelating based on the half life of the chelator, to avoid redistribution of mercury, which happened to me and it's no fun. So yes, chelation can be dangerous and harmful.


Also I'd look at Boyd Haley and his new "anti oxidant" http://www.ctiscience.com/


You can get blood glutathione levels checked at Genova Diagnostics. http://www.genovadiagnostics.com/

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