Myelination

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Myelination
7
Fri, 08-01-2008 - 12:36am

This is a few years old, but we don't talk about this near enough.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Mon, 08-04-2008 - 11:46am

I thought I'd bump this up.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Mon, 08-04-2008 - 2:00pm

As much as I've read on this, no one has really addressed it but Blaylock. Does that mean it's insignificant? Not relevant? Not understood?


I think the latter of the three may play significance. And to my understanding, if it's not addressed = why? My children deserve better than 1/2 baked answers.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Mon, 08-04-2008 - 2:25pm

Those that claim the BBB is fully matured and operational at birth are relying on the lack of data as proof.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Mon, 08-04-2008 - 4:28pm

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/109678928/abstract







Mechanisms of autoimmune neuropathies



Celia F. Brosnan, Dr., PhD *, Luz Claudio, MS, Francine A. Tansey, PhD, James Martiney, MS

Department of pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, bronx, NY

*Correspondence to Celia F. Brosnan, Department of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY 10461








Abstract



Our studies have focused on the mechanisms involved in blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier alterations in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. The results support the conclusion that these diseases are initiated by delayed hypersensitivity reactions. They further demonstrate a role for mast cell degranulation and vasoactive amines in the peripheral nerve. In the central nervous system, our studies have documented both active and passive mechanisms of edema formation and support the conclusion that cytokines may be involved in altered blood-brain barrier permeability and inflammation. We conclude that several mechanisms of barrier breakdown are activated in the inflammatory demyelinating diseases and that alteration in endothelial cell function is a major component of disease induction.

-- Jamie

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Mon, 08-04-2008 - 4:36pm

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/40006657/abstract


Article




Role of central nervous system microvascular pericytes in activation of antigen-primed splenic T-lymphocytes

Roumen Balabanov, Thomas Beaumont, Paula Dore-Duffy *

Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroimmunology, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan


email: Paula Dore-Duffy (pdduffy@med.wayne.edu)


*Correspondence to Paula Dore-Duffy, Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroimmunology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 421 E. Canfield Avenue, 3124 Elliman Building, Detroit, MI 48201.




Funded by:

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Tue, 08-05-2008 - 7:25am

It seems to me that something very recent has come out stating the brain is in development longer than scientists/researchers realized.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Tue, 08-05-2008 - 10:56am

I'm not a specialist in neuroscience, nor is any pediatrician.