NY Rally Info - No to forced shots

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Registered: 04-09-2008
NY Rally Info - No to forced shots
Mon, 07-07-2008 - 9:47am
AAP Leadership Fights Informed Vaccine Choices

by Barbara Loe Fisher


w ww.vaccineawakening.blogspot.com
www.NVIC.org
www.Stand UpBeCounted.org







Vaccine-educated parents in New York stood up for their human right to make informed, voluntary vaccine choices and pushed back Pharma-inspired attempts to pass laws mandating every childhood vaccine the CDC endorses (A10942) and giving children vaccines for sexually transmitted diseases without their parents' knowledge or permission. Parents held rallies and press conferences in Albany at the State Capitol and organized a grassroots email, letter and phone campaign to voice their opposition to all attempts by government officials, drug companies and doctors to force vaccination without parental consent.

The successful challenge by parent activists in New York to powerful and wealthy special interest groups promoting the forced use of multiple vaccines and the re moval of non-medical exemptions to vaccination will be followed by a similar grassroots effort in the next legislative session to protect the religious exemption to vaccination (A03064), obtain a philosophical exemption to vaccination (A05468) and widen the medical exemption to vaccination (A03180) in New York.

Rita Palma (www.ourkids ourchoice.com), who had a religious exemption to vaccination for her son denied by Suffolk school officials, organized the rallies attended by families with vaccine injured as well as healthy children. She and Assemblyman Mark Alessi (D-Wading River) appeared on Fox News June 20 to talk about why parents in New York do not want laws mandating their children get more than five dozen vaccinations currently promoted by the CDC and more vaccines in the future endorsed by CDC employees.

Congratulations to all New York citizens and supportive state legislators who stood up and defended freedom. Every vaccine carries a risk of injury or death and that risk is higher for some than others. No individual or self-appointed group in government, industry or medicine should force fellow Americans to put their lives or the lives of their children on the line for pharmaceutical products that can injure or kill without voluntary informed consent.


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"This is something that is a personal issue. It's our children's bodies and that's what we're here to protect, our rights," said Kim Slavis of Canandaigua......The Department of Health says it's a public health issue, but these parents say when it comes to getting shots it's just too many, too soon. "When we were kids, we were getting 10 vaccinations. Now these kids are getting 37 vaccinations before they get into kindergarten," said Michael Smith of Clifton Park.....If they start with this, what are they going to enforce on us next? What will be the next freedom that they take away from us in terms of our medical rights?" Slavis wondered." - WNYT-TV- Albany (June 10, 2008) http://wnyt.com/article/stories/S472932.shtml ?cat=300

"A few parents at Tuesday's rally said they endured grueling questioning when they cited religious beliefs to avoid immunizing their children. Dr. Lynn Friedman, a chiropractor, said she unsuccessfully sued the Clarkstown School District in Rockland County to allow her son, now 12, to attend school without vaccinations. The school district questioned the validity of her request for a religious exemption. She went through hours of questioning and had her medical records pored over, she said. Her son goes to private school. "It should be our choice to vaccinate our child," she said.....Carolyn Catalano of Hopewell Junction, Dutchess County, said her 12-month-old son, Tyler, would not be vaccinated. Some of the viruses that there are vaccines against, such as rubella, are normal childhood diseases that healthy children can fight, she said. "He can make his own choice once he's older," said Catalano, a pediatric occupational therapist in Mahopac, Putnam County, who has autistic patients. Angela Luhrs, also of Hopewell Junction, said her 1-year-old son is fully vaccinated, but she wants to start delaying some shots because she doesn't want to overwhelm his system. Eventually, he will get everything, she said. "I am here because I do believe there has to be a point at which parents' choice comes into play," she said. Elisa DiBari of North Salem, Westchester County, said her son, now 10, stopped speaking after receiving the measles/mumps/rubella vaccine at 15 months. He was diagnosed with autism and has had a lot of treatments over the years and is doing well." - Cara Matthews, Democrat & Chronicle (June 11, 2008)

"In my childhood, two vaccines were the extent of it. We muddled through whooping cough, measles, German measles, chicken pox and emerged with stronger immune systems. No one that I knew died of any of these diseases. Multiple vaccines in one needle are obscene. I wouldn't do that to my animals. Stepping on a rusty nail, I went for a tetanus shot. After, the nurse said, "You are all set with your tetanus and diphtheria shots." I was enraged. I spent the next week in bed with a high fever and no way of assessing which vaccine was the culprit. Let us not forget the chief beneficiaries of the vaccine craze: our friends in the pharmaceutical industry who cross over to take Food and Drug Administration posts when they cannot get Congress to do their bidding. The payoffs are enormous, according to a reliable friend who once worked in the FDA. The time is overdue for parents to unite and assert themselves against the tyranny of forced medications. The state does not own our children - yet." - Catherine Portman-Laux, The Journal News (June 23, 2008)










Parents rally against mandated vaccines


WNYT-TV, News Channel 13
June 10, 2008

http://wnyt.com/article/stories/S472932.shtml? cat=300


ALBANY - Voicing a concern over state mandated vaccinations, parents and children from across New York were at the Capitol Tuesday morning saying "no to needles."

"My kid, my choice," was the rallying cry of these parents who say when it comes to vaccinating their children, they should be the ones calling the shots -- not the state.

"This is something that is a personal issue. It's our children's bodies and that's what we're here to protect, our rights," said Kim Slavis of Canandaigua.

A proposed law requiring all health care professionals to get a flu shot, would also mandate students heading into seventh grade as well as college be vaccinated for meningitis. This is in addition to the vaccines young kids are already required to get before starting public school.

The Department of Health says it's a public health issue, but these parents say when it comes to getting shots it's just too many, too soon.

"When we were kids, we were getting 10 vaccinations. Now these kids are getting 37 vaccinations before they get into kindergarten," said Michael Smith of Clifton Park.

These parents are not just voicing their concerns over state mandated vaccines. They're pushing for bills that would allow parents to turn down a vaccine based on philosophical exemptions. Another bill would require school districts to accept all religious exemptions without question.

"If they start with this, what are they going to enforce on us next? What will be the next freedom that they take away from us in terms of our medical rights?" Slavis wondered.

NewsChannel 13 asked the Department of Health for an interview regarding the vaccinations and the state mandates, but they did not make anyone available. A spokesperson did say the proposed law is really no different from what they have now, adding they pretty much already require the vaccines recommended by the centers for disease control.








Parents in New York call for choice on vaccinations


Democrat & Chronicle, Albany Bureau
June 11, 2008

by Cara Matthews

htt p://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artic le? AID=/20080611/NEWS01/806110361/1002/NEWS


ALBANY - Holding signs with slogans like "Parents call the shots," people from across the state rallied Tuesday against legislation that would increase the number of required childhood vaccinations and said they want more exemptions from the mandates.

"We do not want any more vaccinations on the schedule," said Rita Palma of Suffolk County, who founded an organization on vaccination exemptions called "My Kids, My Choice."

Palma and dozens of others protested proposed legislation that would require vaccination against meningitis for seventh graders and students entering college, and it would allow minors to get vaccines for sexually transmitted infections without parental consent. The bill, backed by the state Health Department, would change the timing of some required shots from the sixth to seventh grade and require annual flu vaccines for certain health-care workers.

The parents support two other bills, one of which would protect families from "inappropriate and intrusive inquiry" when they seek exemptions from vaccinations based on religious beliefs. The other would let children go without the shots based on "philosophical beliefs."

New York currently allows just two exemptions to the nearly 30 vaccinations children receive between birth and age 6 - one is for medical reasons and the other is for religion.

A growing number of parents have been questioning the need for vaccinations. There is concern that preservatives that have been used in them are connected to autism.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Autism Information Center has found that the "weight of the evidence indicates that vaccines are not associated with autism." The mercury-containing vaccine preservative called Thimerosal has not been used in any shots except some flu vaccines since 2001.

All but two states allow students to go without vaccinations because of religious beliefs (with West Virginia and Mississippi as the holdouts) and 19 permit families to opt out for philosophical reasons, according to My Kids My Choice.

The Health Department believes that kids need to be protected against deadly childhood diseases that killed many people in previous generations, said agency spokeswoman Claudia Hutton.

"We do want kids to get better. We do want kids to avoid disease," she said.

The meningitis vaccine is recommended by the CDC. New York has waited a few years before seeking a requirement for it to make sure that the vaccine was successful, she said.

A few parents at Tuesday's rally said they endured grueling questioning when they cited religious beliefs to avoid immunizing their children.

Dr. Lynn Friedman, a chiropractor, said she unsuccessfully sued the Clarkstown School District in Rockland County to allow her son, now 12, to attend school without vaccinations. The school district questioned the validity of her request for a religious exemption. She went through hours of questioning and had her medical records pored over, she said. Her son goes to private school.

"It should be our choice to vaccinate our child," she said.

Tom Petrie of the Schachter Center for Complementary Medicine in Suffern, Rockland County, said vaccinations are not necessary for children. A healthy lifestyle and diet that includes a lot of fruits and vegetables are. If they come into contact with someone who has a disease, their immune system can fight if it is healthy enough, he said.

Carolyn Catalano of Hopewell Junction, Dutchess County, said her 12-month-old son, Tyler, would not be vaccinated. Some of the viruses that there are vaccines against, such as rubella, are normal childhood diseases that healthy children can fight, she said.

"He can make his own choice once he's older," said Catalano, a pediatric occupational therapist in Mahopac, Putnam County, who has autistic patients.

Angela Luhrs, also of Hopewell Junction, said her 1-year-old son is fully vaccinated, but she wants to start delaying some shots because she doesn't want to overwhelm his system. Eventually, he will get everything, she said. "I am here because I do believe there has to be a point at which parents' choice comes into play," she said.

Elisa DiBari of North Salem, Westchester County, said her son, now 10, stopped speaking after receiving the measles/mumps/rubella vaccine at 15 months. He was diagnosed with autism and has had a lot of treatments over the years and is doing well.

CLMATTHE@Gannett.com








Speak out against forced vaccinations


The Journal News (NY)
June 23, 2008

Opinion by Catherine Portman-Laux

http://lohud.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article? AID=/20080623/OPINION/806230315/1016/OPINION0 1


Kudos to parents with guts to confront forced vaccinations of their children ("Bill pushing vaccines for kids spurs protest by N.Y. parents," June 11 story). This wresting of parental control is frightfully reminiscent of Nazi Germany.

Parents seeking validation of problems posed by multiple vaccinations need look no further than Pennsylvania's Amish communities, where religion prohibits vaccinations. Autism is unknown among Amish children. When one case cropped up, it turned out that the child was adopted and had an unknown vaccine history.

In my childhood, two vaccines were the extent of it. We muddled through whooping cough, measles, German measles, chicken pox and emerged with stronger immune systems. No one that I knew died of any of these diseases.

Multiple vaccines in one needle are obscene. I wouldn't do that to my animals. Stepping on a rusty nail, I went for a tetanus shot. After, the nurse said, "You are all set with your tetanus and diphtheria shots." I was enraged. I spent the next week in bed with a high fever and no way of assessing which vaccine was the culprit.

Let us not forget the chief beneficiaries of the vaccine craze: our friends in the pharmaceutical industry who cross over to take Food and Drug Administration posts when they cannot get Congress to do their bidding. The payoffs are enormous, according to a reliable friend who once worked in the FDA.

The time is overdue for parents to unite and assert themselves against the tyranny of forced medications. The state does not own our children - yet.

Catherine Portman-Laux
Garrison


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