Suggestion in the Literature

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Suggestion in the Literature
4
Tue, 06-16-2009 - 5:06pm

Some doctors say that there’s suggestion in the literature that the incidence of shingles is higher in children contracting wild-type CP compared to vaccinated children.

Hum, I’m wondering…did that *suggestion* include those who got both the vaccine AND the chickenpox? Nevermind…

Does anyone know of this study? (I’m looking forward to reading it.) I’m really curious, what year did this study occur?

I can not think of a single time in history when we have kept up with the “incidence” of shingles or chickenpox or any other self-limiting disease.

Oh well, it’s only *suggestion* in the literature... I'll take anecdotal evidence over *suggestion* any day .

On second glance... doesn’t it sound like those subjects in the study who got the disease were *not vaccinated*? Because I’m especially interested in those studies of vaccinated VS non-vaccinated. I keep hearing about them but I NEVER CAN FIND THEM. Wonder Why?

Okay...on THIRD glance! I'm wondering if the study says anything at all about the AGE at which the *subject* contracted shingles.

Old people get shingles. It's a fact. Children getting shingles today is fact as well. Only that was NOT fact throughout HISTORY. Today children are getting shingles at an alarming rate. We all know it's because of the chickenpox vaccine!

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Wed, 06-17-2009 - 8:17am

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Wed, 06-17-2009 - 8:26am

I did find some "literature" on this. It's an op piece from Duke Children's Hospital. Not surprisingly, it's someone pushing for mass immunizations for all children.


http://www.dukehealth.org/HealthLibrary/AdviceFromDoctors/YourChildsHealth/chicken_pox/


Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Wed, 06-17-2009 - 8:30pm

Opinion pieces gain more and more exposure from those who spread hearsay and groupspeak. It makes one wonder where people get their information from. Surely not doctors who get their information from opinion pieces. :(




Edited 6/17/2009 11:06 pm ET by crunchymomto2
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-18-2007
Wed, 07-01-2009 - 2:30pm

When the term is used, someone is making their own conclusions based on review of available literature. I believe those in the scientific community call it pseudoscience.

In order for one's conclusions to be valid, they must properly design their own question. Outline their methodology, control for confounders and disclose all interests, financial or otherwise. They must test their question in animal models. Then they can graduate to pilot studies. Then they can test it in larger human studies.

Or, they can use epidemiology and lie.