Vaccinate later, rather than earlier?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Vaccinate later, rather than earlier?
12
Mon, 11-02-2009 - 9:51pm

Last night I was reading the latest Wired Magazine which had an article that touted the benefits of vaccination and the reasons why some people don't get their kids vaccines.

One of the arguments was that the recommended schedule has too many vaccines at too early an age. Which leads me to ask...for those of you who don't vaccinate early, do you plan to do vaccinations when your kids are older?

If you never plan to get the vaccines, what do you do to keep your kids away from others when they are sick in case they do have something nasty that could infect an infant?

I personally have gotten my kids every vaccination, and we get flu shots every year. My mother-in-law had mumps when she was 12 and lost most of her hearing. I knew a family with a 1 month old who got whooping cough and died (the one month old was too young for the vaccine, but speculation from the health department it was caught from a child at church who had never been vaccinated.) We did probably have the swine flu the beginning of September - my 4 year old developed breathing issues in a short span of time and I had to take him to the ER. My son has no other health issues. I would have rather have had the shot than him to be so scared (all the other symptoms aside - it was no picnic.) I also have known kids whose vaccines did not take and ended up with measles anyhow.

So what do you do to keep your kids and the community healthy? And does the too early argument hold any water with you? Do you have plans to do it later, or known people who have?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Mon, 11-02-2009 - 11:36pm

No, I don't buy into the hype and I'm not terrified of self-limiting diseases. If my child was properly vaccinated and dosed with other constant pharmaceuticals every day (like allergy and ADHD drugs) then I would not consider my child healthy and then - I might worry.

But since most of these diseases are not found in the US, and since most of the vaccines are known not to work until say, FIVE boosters and others have been known to fail after ALL boosters - then I would say our chances of getting these diseases are fairly even - vaccinated or not!

The health of the child is what matters.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Tue, 11-03-2009 - 6:33pm

I typed out a big long response last night shortly after this was posted.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 12:03pm

Ok, I will agree that the health department probably did not have all the facts.

But what I want to know is are there people who say that the vaccination schedule is too much too early, and do they get the vaccinations later when their children are older? Or, does no one use this argument and the article was total bull?

I know families who do not vaccinate and have never heard this argument before. The families that I know do not do it because 1, they had a child who had a really bad reaction, or 2, they are totally against the vaccinations as a whole. I have never heard in personal conversation the "too much too early."

The article did make one good point - the fact that we get the vaccinations (and many others like us) is why the diseases are now not prevalent in this country. If none of us got the vaccinations the diseases would be here to the same extent as in other countries. The more people who get vaccinations the better it is for those who do not. I personally would like to see research on identifying people who may have potential issues with them so that they can be screened out. Probably a pipe dream...

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 2:14pm

What countries have a high prevalence of VPDs?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 3:47pm

I checked out your website. I do need to read it more carefully, but right off the top, comparing rates of bacterial diseases (scarlet fever, typhoid) to viruses is comparing apples to oranges. The bacterial deaths went down most likely because of antibiotics, which they don't mention as a factor in the study. There is no corresponding treatment for viral diseases. Nutrition, as they pointed out, certainly did play a part in the scurvy (and rickets too if they had studied that. I will admit that perhaps as a population becomes healthier due to good nutrition that they may be less likely to get diseases. That works for a population though, not the individual. My kids and I get every sickness that comes along regardless of good hand washing, homeschooling, and keeping my kids away from places like supermarkets with sneezed on carts!

Yes, every parent needs to make the choices concerning vaccines, medications and diet (and schooling) based on what is best for their family. My doctor never tried to scare us into having vaccines, and would have been just as happy to have us as patients if we had not been vaccinated. I am sure that she was not the norm through out the country though.

Please don't get me wrong - I came to this board because it is a debate board - if it had been a support for not doing vaccines I would not be posting here. I do try to respect others views, and debate is one way that I can challenge my thinking and research things more fully as other people have access and knowledge different than mine.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 5:24pm

No, she is not the norm.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 6:07pm

BTW have you ever read a study on the safety of the vaccine program as it stands today?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-28-2007
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 7:43pm

Well, my oldest is vaccinated in all but his 2nd MMR and varicella. My 2nd ds has everything up to age 2, (minus MMR and varicella) and my dd (3 in a few weeks) has had a polio and a preservative free flu shot (this year).

I can positively say I am done vaccinating the boys. I reserve the right to change my mind as they get older and vaccine science can really prove it's safety (doubt it though). My dd may or may not get additional vaccines as the years go on.

I grew up in Ireland; most of my friends, classmates, neighbors etc caught the 5 childhood diseases (Measles, mumps, rubella, varicella and Fifth's disease). No one was blinded, became deaf, developed seizures etc. Now, I'm not dumb to this ether. My Mother was exposed to rubella when pregnant and yes I was born with a birth defect (congenital cataract and hence I am just about blind in one eye). The reality is the rubella vaccine was not available in the mid 1970's in Ireland or the UK, so she couldn't have helped it.

Now, here's my present day take on this; if you are a grown woman of childbearing age, go and get the vaccine yourself. Stop feeding off the pediatric population to protect you and your unborn child.

The same goes for Hep B. In fact remove those vaccines that are really an adults responsibility then we can have a true debate on the issue.

Dee

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 8:14pm

I also wanted to note that antibiotics (safe ones that were used widely) were not introduced until the 1940's during WW2.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Wed, 11-04-2009 - 8:25pm

If you never plan to get the vaccines, what do you do to keep your kids away from others when they are sick in case they do have something nasty that could infect an infant?


Probably the same thing you do, keep my kid home when he is sick.

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