Virginia teen suffers rare illness...

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Virginia teen suffers rare illness...
134
Thu, 11-12-2009 - 3:51am

Boy diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome, but CDC says no clear link

Jordan McFarland, 14, was hospitalized for five days after coming down with Guillain-Barre syndrome hours after receiving a vaccination for H1N1.

By JoNel Aleccia
Health writer
Nov. 11, 2009

A 14-year-old Virginia boy is weak and struggling to walk after coming down with a reported case of Guillain-Barre syndrome within hours after receiving the H1N1 vaccine for swine flu.

Jordan McFarland, a high school athlete from Alexandria, Va., left Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children Tuesday night in a wheelchair nearly a week after developing severe headaches, muscle spasms and weakness in his legs following a swine flu shot. He will likely need the assistance of a walker for four to six weeks, plus extensive physical therapy.

“The doctor said I’ll recover fully, but it’s going to take some time,” the teenager said.

Jordan is among the first people in the nation to report developing the potentially life-threatening muscle disorder after receiving the H1N1 vaccine this fall. His alarming reaction was submitted via msnbc.com’s reader reporting tool, First Person, by his stepmother, Arlene Connin.

http://katysexposure.wordpress.com/2009/11/12/virginia-teen-suffers-rare-illness-guillain-barre-after-swine-flu-shot/

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-14-2005
Mon, 11-16-2009 - 11:26am
We asked if there is some sort of post-titer test available and our Dr also said no.





iVillage Member
Registered: 06-16-2009
Mon, 11-16-2009 - 1:33pm

If you are interested here is some interesting (to me) reading on the accuracy and policy of the CDC in regards to said rapid tests:


http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/diagnosis/rapidlab.htm

Photobucket

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Mon, 11-16-2009 - 5:13pm

>>You said that in regard to your isolationist town. Can you substantiate this? H1N1 is provided free of charge. I am confused<<<

How do you propose I get proof for you? Show you shot records for the wealthy? It's as simple as this. I have asked a few of the wealthy people if they have gotten it and they said yes. I have called my daughter's ped and other doctors, and they don't have it. None of my friends who are not wealthy have it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-09-2009
Mon, 11-16-2009 - 5:17pm
You would think that with the widespread panic these doctors and pharma companies are causing, they would want to test people to see when this pandemic is over. Although, the people who have had it and don't know might still get the vaccine, so as long as there's a buck to gain from the public, things will go on as usual, I suppose.
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-06-2009
Mon, 11-16-2009 - 5:26pm

Not exactly a scientific sample.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 11-17-2009 - 12:53am
That's what I meant, sorry.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 11-17-2009 - 12:59am

"Why aren't we tracking?

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/health/Too-Many-Swine-Flu-Cases-to-Keep-Track--63849572.html"

What does that have to do with numbers being pulled out of thin air?

They either have good numbers or they don't. I fail to see your point.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Tue, 11-17-2009 - 1:00am
Sorry, I needed to correct that but then decided to leave it...
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-06-2009
Tue, 11-17-2009 - 1:59pm

Try reading the approach undertaken by Minnesota, as an example;


http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/flu/flutracking.html


Keeping Track of Flu in Minnesota

Many people get sick with flu every year in Minnesota without ever seeing a doctor or reporting their illness. Therefore, MDH uses various indicators to find out how widespread the flu is in Minnesota each week, rather than trying to track every case. The MDH Public Health Laboratory (PHL) also tests selected influenza specimens to monitor which flu strains are circulating each flu season.


On this page:
How does the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) keep track of the flu in Minnesota?
Do all cases of influenza in the state get reported to MDH?
Why aren't there more "confirmed" cases of flu? You often report only a few cases - when everyone knows there's a lot of flu out there
Some states are reporting a lot more flu cases than Minnesota. Why is that?


How does the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) keep track of the flu in Minnesota?

MDH monitors influenza activity in several ways:



  • Physicians and labs report severe cases of influenza, including encephalitis and influenza-related hospitalizations in children under 18 years of age.
  • Sentinel providers submit reports every week of the number of patients they've seen with any influenza-like illness (ILI).
  • Schools and long-term care facilities report influenza outbreaks.
  • The MDH Public Health Laboratory (PHL) tests samples submitted by medical clinics and labs around the state. This is how we identify "confirmed cases" of the flu and how we know which strains of flu are present in the state.
  • Weekly reports summarize all types of flu activity in Minnesota.

Do all cases of influenza in the state get reported to MDH?

No - many cases are never reported. We do not attempt to track - or get reports on - all cases of flu. Most cases are never reported to anyone, since most people with the flu never see a doctor about their illness - and many of those who do are never tested for influenza.


Even if it were possible to track all cases of influenza in the state, it wouldn't be useful to do so. Flu is so common during the winter months that we could never actively investigate all of the cases reported to us. We would simply be "counting cases" - and that wouldn't help us protect the health of the public.


Why aren't there more "confirmed" cases of flu? You often report only a few cases - when everyone knows there's a lot of flu out there

Although confirmed cases may provide a rough indication of influenza activity, that's not the primary reason we keep track of them. Confirmed cases allow us to (1) determine when we're first starting to see flu activity each year (the "first flu case of the season"), and (2) determine what strains of flu are circulating in any given year.


That's the main reason we confirm influenza cases in the MDH lab - finding out what kind of flu is around, whether the current vaccine protects against it, and providing information to determine the components of next year's vaccine. Only a tiny fraction of all flu cases are ever confirmed in our lab.


Some states are reporting a lot more flu cases than Minnesota. Why is that?

Some states track influenza cases diagnosed by physicians or clinics, using a "rapid" diagnostic test. That approach can generate a much larger number of reported influenza cases. We rely instead on culture-confirmation done in our own lab, because it gives us a much more accurate picture of which flu strains are in circulation. MDH's lab also does rapid tests to facilitate patient treatment and outbreak control. Only culture confirmed results are included in the MDH influenza statistics.


Does that help?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-03-2009
Fri, 11-20-2009 - 2:03am

Gotta say I kinda like the "It's a conspiracy man" theory best so far.

~ Mav

Pages