What is it about vaccine reactions?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
What is it about vaccine reactions?
70
Mon, 01-12-2009 - 9:10am

I'm having a hard time figuring out something.

Point A: Obviously vaccines have some risks, or we wouldn't be hearing about parasites, i.e. non-vaxers, taking advantage of the virtuous, who undergo the RISK of having their children vaccinated to maintain herd immunity against disease. Right?

Point B: People who claim to have vaccine damaged children obviously vaccinated them, took the risk, and are enduring the consequences. So these people should be treated as heroes for herd immunity. Right?

Point C: However, in real life, vaccine damage is very likely to be dismissed. By doctors. By the program which is supposed to compensate the vaccine injured. In news stories. In medical journals. By CDC spokespeople. And in the online community it seems to be mostly either ignored or denied. Why?

Where I'm heading with this: the problem of the denial of vaccine damage has a lot to do with fueling the vaccine critics. Even parents whose children are vaccine damaged don't necessarily jump immediately and totally into the anti-vaccine camp. They are pushed there, gradually, but the discovery that they are considered to be the bad guys, even though they vaccinated and even though their children took the risk and even though they did their bit for herd immunity and a lot more. And other parents read these stories and see what happened and see who gets blamed and who doesn't.

So why the attempts to pretend that there is RISK but that this risk never results in any actual injuries?

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 2:46pm
Most definitely agree!!!!

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2008
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 3:03pm

I don't think your concerns are unfounded.

Rands

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Thu, 01-15-2009 - 3:17pm
Great post. I like the idea but will the people who's pocketbook's are effected like the idea?
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Fri, 01-16-2009 - 8:49am

How much is all this chronic illness costing us all?

There was a actually a study in Lancet 15 or so years ago, showing that a population of children who were most unvaxed (and had had measles) had considerably less asthma and allergy problems. There has been further research on this in Europe, I think it is called the Parsifal Project or something like that. They are also considering other lifestyle stuff, eating fermented veggies, for example. To wander OT, my daughter and a friend spent yesterday afternoon making a bunch of kimchee. Yummy!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Fri, 01-16-2009 - 4:25pm

kimchee?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Fri, 01-16-2009 - 10:31pm

It is Korea's version of sauerkraut.

Nowadays pickling is done with vinegar which makes it standardized and fairly easy to mass produce. In olden times (as my grandkids phrase it), veggies were preserved via fermentation. The process has many variations. What we did:

carefully clean carrots, daikon radish, napa cabbage, bok choy, green onions and green cabbage, oh yes, we threw in a little raddichio for color. You've got to get all the dirt off, so the carrots and radish have to be peeled. Get rid of any bad or rotten stuff, too. Chop everything up. The leafy stuff can be chopped big, the carrot and radish need to be sliced up small. Add kosher salt to veggies which should be in a big stainless steel bowl. Then you pound the veggies for a long time. We were using a heavy metal meat tenderizer in one bowl and a potato masher in the other bowl. Stir occasionally with a wooden spoon. Kids generally like pounding veggies. Eventually a bunch of liquid comes out. When they get quite wet and there is a fair bit of liquid in the bowls transfer the kimchee into wide-mouthed canning jars using a wide funnel. Pack the veggies down tight with the wooden spoon, leaving about an inch at the top. Try to make sure that the veggies are under the liquid in every jar. Cover tightly with lids. Put in a warm, not hot spot. After three days or so there will be bubbles rising. Taste. It has a sort of yummy, tangy flavor. Once it has fermented properly it can be stored in the refrigerator, although it doesn't necessarily have to be refrigerated if you have a reasonably cool spot for storage.

What is the point? Fermented veggies are a raw food, so you get the enzymes. They also contain lots of good bacteria, so they support a healthy digestive system.

I'd suggest finding a real recipe, mine doesn't have quite enough detail to really swing it, but I wanted to give the flavor of the process. Both of my grandchildren helped, when they felt like it, and were very pleased to be making their own food.

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2005
Sat, 01-17-2009 - 2:19pm

Thanks! My Mom and my Aunt were just discussing that over the holidays. My grandmother used to make it in a churn and some of us remember pretty much what to do. Your post helps, thanks!

(I coulda looked it up) We always referred to it as "Kraut". I ate in on hotdogs until I got old enough to realize how it was made, then it grossed me out, lol. Now I know that it is good for me, maybe we will try to make some. I still have the churn my grandmother used to make it in.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Sun, 01-18-2009 - 5:40pm

Lots of different cultures do the fermented veggie thing. Sauerkraut is the German version, I guess.

I kept the jars in the bathroom while they were fermenting because it is the warmest room in the house. Sort of a yuck place for food, but anywhere else wouldn't have worked. The jars were too full and there was a little bit of overflow as the bacteria did their good work, but that was the only problem. Popped them into the frig today and I'm looking forward to some great munchies over the next two or three weeks.

whoops, we are off topic again!

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Sun, 01-18-2009 - 5:46pm

To get back on topic, I counted up a recent vaccine schedule (including influenza vaccines) and came up with 53 vaccines (counting combo vaccines by their separate components) by age 5. If the statistic of one really bad reaction out of a million doses is correct, then major reactions are hitting one in every 18,868 children at this point. Leaving out any negative synergy from the number of vaccines a child has to deal with at one time (up to 8 or 9) and also leaving out any negative synergy from vaccines given to children who aren't healthy.

Please, pro-vaxers, tell me where I am going wrong with this?

http://insidevaccines.com/wordpress
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-02-2009
Mon, 01-19-2009 - 11:25am

I'm going to keep bumping this up until a pro-vaxer explains where my numbers for vaccine reactions are incorrect.

And if no one does, then we will assume that I've correctly demonstrated that really serious vaccine reactions are occurring at a rate of at least one in every 18,000 children--or more.

And that these serious reactions are ignored and dismissed and sometimes even covered up to protect the vaccine program.

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