C-section because of small pelvic bones

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-24-2009
C-section because of small pelvic bones
2
Thu, 12-24-2009 - 2:03am

Just wondering about the percentage of women who have cesareans because their pelvic bones aren't open enough...? Does anyone know?


I just had a cesarean on Dec 12 because of this reason, I was told that my pelvic bones are heart shaped and are very small. So i can never have babies naturally unless they're very small. (3 pounds or so) I tried to have a natural waterbirth, without any medications but the doctor actually had me push at 9cm and not fully effaced which caused really bad pain... So that ended the no pain medications. And i kept trying but got nowhere and i had to have a c-section, which still bothers me greatly... I wanted a natural waterbirth so bad. When i first found out i was pregnant i thought i would have to have a cesarean but the doctors said it was rare that my bones would be too small and i'd be surprised. I looked it up and read that it was rare (not how rare it is, which i really want to know!) So i thought i could do it... So now that i had to have the oporation, it's been bothering me so so much.....


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-18-2009
Sun, 12-27-2009 - 12:55am

Hello and Congratulations on your two little ones!


Your birth story sounds a little odd with the doctor asking you to push so early (at 9) -- do you know why? Also, did they give you any indication of how they know that your pelvic bones are small and mis-shaped?


I've had 3 C sections, my first two after unmedicated birth attempts with LONG pushing phases and baby never entered into my pelvis. I pushed in all sorts of positions and I baby's head would not fit through my bones. CPD is very rare - most women are made to birth babies --

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-24-2009
Mon, 12-28-2009 - 12:50am

Well it took a long time for them to actually tell me and the doctor who had told me to push didn't even mention her thoughts about anything. She just went and got a different doctor to come in and help out.