Maybe we've gone down this road before....

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
Maybe we've gone down this road before....
23
Tue, 07-15-2014 - 2:19pm

Or not?  The nostalgia road - but this one about books you read as a child.  I was mentioning the movie we rented and saw (under the Movies section below) - Saving Mr. Banks and how it is the story of Walt Disney getting the rights to produce the movie Mary Poppins from the author of the book, Mary Poppins, P.H. Travers.  Anyway, I was wondering how many people here may have read the book way back, or for that matter, saw the movie Mary Poppins when it came out in 1964?  Or what books did you read as a child into adolescence, perhaps that you especially enjoyed?  I read among others which I'll  mention later, Mary Poppins and I do believe there was more than one in that series, but I cannot recall much what was in those stories - maybe more so the first book because I also saw the movie and so it reenforced what I remember about the book's story. 

Shirley

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Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Tue, 07-15-2014 - 3:28pm

Never read it, believe I saw the movie at 5 when it came out.  I was always a mystery reader (still am) so was more into Nancy Drew and then others (like Agatha Christie) as I got older/into teens.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Tue, 07-15-2014 - 6:36pm

Waited in line for two hours to see the movie, I remember it was a chilly spring day.  It was showing at the theatre on Sherbrooke street not far from where you lived as a child. The theatre is gone now.

I also read Nancy Drew but, when I hit my teens, my taste in books expanded to historical biographies.  I remember one book especially.. the bio of Marie de Medici.  I had an aunt who would pass on to me whatever she read. I would take an author and would read everything he/she wrote. So, I went through a D.H. Lawrence phase (Sons & Lovers I especially liked), a Dicken's phase (who doesn't love Dickens) and Austin (P&P still love it).

Books I especially loved as a  teen- " A Tree grows in Brooklyn", " Who have seen the Wind"  and  "Two Solitudes".

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Tue, 07-15-2014 - 7:51pm

I'm going to date myself, but my mom took me, and my sister, to see Mary Poppins for my 12th birthday present.  It was released 4 days after my birthday.  We stood in line for an hour, and the neighborhood theater we attended is also, alas, long gone.

As for books I read as a child and teen, there are far too many to mention.  Better to list some favorite authors, since once I read one, I read them all...  Robert Heinlein, Andre Norton, Ian Fleming, Alastair Maclean, Naigo March, Martha Grimes, Mary Roberts Reinhart, C.S. Lewis, H. P. Lovecraft, Madeleine L'Engle, John D. MacDonald, Ray Bradbury, Edgar Rice Burroughs, & Jules Verne, to name but a few.

As a young child, I fell in love with the Velveteen Rabbit, by Margery Williams.  I wore my copy to death, and when I mentioned this to Ed during our early days of dating, he bought me a new one.  I have it to this day.

Avatar for nora_mcl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-30-2011
Tue, 07-15-2014 - 8:28pm

Then, as now, I read almost everything I could get my hands on. Nancy Drew (& Hardy Boys)of course, Anne of Green Gables-as a good Canadian girl must-over & over again. Mary Poppins, I think so-but I don't remember seeing it in theatres. I remember seeing Julie Andrews in "Sound of Music" when it first came out.

The books that resonated with me most were by Louisa May Alcott-the Little Women, Little Men books. They went with me into nursing residence. When I was feeling sad & homesick-I read again about Beth dying & would sob. I gave my granddaughters those books-& last year, Anya informed me they were "Boring"-I said about crying when Beth died & she said "wait a minute-someone dies?-no Grandma, don't take it away yet!"

And of course, I read the books that were on my parents' shelves-especially if they said I shouldn't. When our kids were young, I carefully did not censor their books. If something was not suitable-I usually did not keep it around. I remember shortly after moving here, Susan came home & informed me that the school librarian did not approve of Judy Blume books. So from then on-for SQiRT(Student Quiet Reading Time)you can bet she took every Judy Blume book we had in the house-& bought more to take.

Nora

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 07-16-2014 - 12:43am

Ahhh, red-headed Anne and her Gilbert!  My dds LOVED those books, and the PBS series even more.  And yes, I read Little Women and sobbed, and Old Yeller and sobbed, and Diary of Anne Frank and sobbed, and the Yearling and sobbed, and Call of the Wild and sobbed, and Black Beauty and sobbed....  Why were so many of those books "character builders"?

Animal stories that did NOT leave me sobbing were Misty, Stormy, Sea Star, Brighty of the Grand Canyon, Justin Morgan Had A Horse, King of the Wind...  I read everything Marguerite Henry wrote, and wished desperatly, like so many girls, for a pony of my own.

Animal stories, and PBS, reminds me of the James Herriot "All Creatures Great and Small" books and tv series.  I remember sitting on the bus & train, on my way to school and work, and being overcome with paroxyms of laughter...
“My mind went back to that picture in the obstetrics book. A cow standing in the middle of a gleaming floor while a sleek veterinary surgeon in a spotless parturition overall inserted his arm to a polite distance. He was relaxed and smiling, the farmer and his helpers were smiling, even the cow was smiling. There was no dirt or blood or sweat anywhere.
That man in the picture had just finished an excellent lunch and had moved next door to do a bit of calving just for the sheer pleasure of it, as a kind of dessert. He hadn't crawled shivering from his bed at two o'clock in the morning and bumped over twelve miles of frozen snow, staring sleepily ahead till the lonely farm showed in the headlights. He hadn't climbed half a mile of white fell-side to the doorless barn where his patient lay.”
James Herriot, If Only They Could Talk

Every time I watch an episode of "The Adventures of Dr. Pol" on Animal Planet, and he's standing knee deep in a barn, wearing poo and blood covered Wellies and overalls, with his arm up to the shoulder in a cow's uterus, it takes me right back. 

And I guess there were a fair number of character builders in the books my kids read, which I read also, since if it's in my house, and in print, I will read it.  Where the Red Fern Grows, and Bridge to Terabithia spring right to mind.

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Wed, 07-16-2014 - 10:15am

I loved the "All Creatures" series and then read all the books, and re-listened to all of them, read by Christopher TImothy...great stuff...(and then to have 'Tristan' as Dr Who (didn't watch that era) or 'Siegfried' as Cornelius Fudge makes me laugh!)

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
Wed, 07-16-2014 - 1:02pm

My earliest memories of reading books are the book series "The Bobbsey Twins" and I had the whole set, I'm sure!  I never did like Nancy Drew though (I hated how the author always ended a chapter in a way that made you want to get to the next chapter to find out whatever and I deemed that a cheap trick in writing...LOL).  I did read a number of the Cherry Ames Nurse series.  Other series books I read were Mary Poppins (at least I think there were more than just the one), Enid Blyton's series which I cannot remember the titles to but the stories featured a group of children who had wonderful adventures!  I read all of the Black Stallion series and other books about horses.  And then yes, Anne of Green Gables - and all those in the series and others the author wrote featuring other heroines, but I can't recall the titles exactly of those.  I read some of Dickens books, and Little Women.  Oh and Charlotte's Web...the first book I cried when Charlotte died.  I read Dr. Doolittle series too. 

There are some books I read that I just cannot remember the titles to, but which I do recall liking very much featuring three little girls living in turn of the 19th (or is it 20th?) century.  And do you recall the magical feeling when reading a book where you felt something very special that I can't even really find a name to describe this feeling?  I had an experience like that with a book I can't even remember the title of now.  I suppose it is the ability of a book to transport you in your imagination and some magical feelings that come with that. 

Thank goodness for libraries - it was a revelation when my older sister brought me to the library when I was about 6 years old for the first time.  So many books and that you could take home!  I even have a memory (albeit a vague one!) of one of the first books I must have looked at or taken out - something to do with illustrations featuring ducks...lovely illustrations, as I remember.  We had some books in our family but not a lot of children's books.  My father began buying books and reading prodigiously perhaps later when he retired and had more time for that (and money, now that most his children were grown up, my older siblings, that is).  I remember we had books at our cottage...not children's books but other stuff (can't even remember what) but we did have the World Book Encyclopedia and I remember taking those down and looking through those.  Looking at whatever caught my interest in topics, or photos and illustrations. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009

My kids were in EFI so this house was full of books in French, from Quebec wriiten in Quebecois.  I really don't remember all the titles; we would order them from the school. But the books were age appropriate.

My kids are of "Potter generation". It was always a big deal in this house when a latest Potter book was coming out.  DD was more into those books; DS loved books like "The Giver", "Holes" and "Hachet". 

Nora, I don't remember there being any problem with the Judy Blume books but it could be that the teachers were onto to complaining about the Underpants books. LOL!

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
Wed, 07-16-2014 - 1:13pm

Oooh, forgot the Winnie the Pooh book series!  I read those or some of them.  I loved the illustrations by E.H., Shepard  in the books. 

Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Thu, 07-17-2014 - 1:05am

I know that I have always loved to read but unfortunately I don't remember much of what I read as a child. Bobbsey Twins, Nancy Drew, The Cat in the Hat and The Cat in the Hat Comes Back (but none of the other Suess books). I must have read some books about horses because I was horse-crazy like so many girls but the closest I got to having a horse was riding lessons when I was 9 LOL. I read some biographies, Dolly Madison comes to mind. During the school year I checked out books from the somewhat limited school library; the public library was far for us so we rarely went there. I owned very few books; my parents both liked to read especially my dad who read every night, but I guess that was not how they chose to spend. I don't think I ever read Mary Poppins but I know that I saw the movie. I can remember reading Mad Magazine and Archie comic books during long summers. My brothers also had DC superhero comics but I had to be really bored to read those. 

In my mid-late teens when I got a job and had some money I started buying books, some of which I still have. I have most of the works of Colette, and some D.H.Lawrence.

My kids always had lots of books from birth onward. We both were voracious readers all throughout childhood and their teens and I made a point of taking them to the public library to get books on a regular basis, and during the school year we purchased a lot of titles through Scholastic. (fortunately in 1995 we moved into a house that has a library room so we had shelves for them)  A few years ago I had them help me cull the books to those that they each especially loved and would want their children to enjoy---which was still about 100 books! Some of them, like ds' Laura Ingalls Wilder collection, will probably need to be replaced if there are grandchildren because he read them so many times they are rather tattered.

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