BOOKS

Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
BOOKS
9
Mon, 07-15-2013 - 1:36pm

Tell us about a book that you think we might enjoy

Avatar for nora_mcl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-30-2011
In reply to: elc11
Tue, 07-16-2013 - 8:40am

As I have claimed before, I fall under the category "Avid Reader"-some would say "Obsessive" Reader-& in fact, at this moment, it is unusual because I only have 2 books on the go. However, that aside, I thought I'd share a few of the books I've read that are good & you might enjoy.

Most of us have read "The Pilgrimage of Harold Fry" & a similar book is "The 100- Year-Old Man who climbed out the window and disappeared". Not quite as good, but almost-and quite funny, as it goes along.(author is Jonas Jonasson)

Another one is "A Thousand Farewells" by Nahlah Ayed". She is a CBC TV reporter who reports from the middle East & she explains what is happening there & a history of why it is happening. I understood some of what caused Eygpt & Tunisia rebelling-but not all of it & she does explain a lot & now it makes sense to even me. She has been there to live (though she grew up in Winnipeg originally)& it helps to know more.

And much to my surprise-my bedside book is not its usual 'piece of fluff'-it is a big book I heard about-"Far From The Tree" by Andrew Solomon & his sub-title is Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity. He examines how children are different from their parents -both why this can be & how both children & parents cope with these major differences. I am almost done it-he's covered homosexuality, Down's Syndrome, disability, schizophrenia, prodigies...etc-I'm now beginning to read about the family of one of the Columbine killers, the next chapter is about Transgender families. It is a complex book but written in everyday English & quite interesting. I think that every family has something-admitted or not-that is puzzling to them as to how that happened from their genes.

My cooking is pretty basic, I don't often get to movies-but books are my genre of choice!

Nora

 

 

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
In reply to: shirley_v
Fri, 07-19-2013 - 6:35pm

Those books sound interesting, Nora.  I'll check them out. 

The book I've recently read is "Cooked" by Michael Pollan.  He covers the 4 basic kinds of food 'transformation' - covering them under the subtitles "Fire" (cooking with fire, as in barbecue), "Water" (cooking with water or steam...braising or stews), "Air" meaning making bread with the use of natural or commercial  yeasts (yeasts in the air to make sourdough bread).  And "Earth" meaning fermentation...which is not so much cooking but is certainly the transformation of vegetables, dairy products or grains into something different...sauerkraut, cheeses and beer, for example. 

The book is quite entertaining in that he covers historical and his own personal sort of practical research into these forms of food making.  Not the book for everyone but it interested me.

I'm reading "Stumbling on Happiness" by Daniel Gilbert which is a science based book telling how our minds work and in regard to what we think will make us happy.  Why what we think may not be what really works to make us happy all due to how our brains/mind function.  I've not finished it yet, but it is fascinating reading (yet no real heavy science jargon - just some experiments mentioned to back up what he is describing). 

The book I read before these two was "Salt, Sugar, Fat" by Michael Moss.  Which I may have mentioned before?  Kind of interesting in describing how the big corporations produce process foods high in those ingredients which much of us might like - but maybe we aren't really aware of how much of salt, sugar and/or fat is included (sometimes almost hidden) in many of these processed foods.  The book does focus a fair amount on the behind the scenes technicalities of how big corporations work to make and sell their products. 

Shirley

Avatar for nora_mcl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-30-2011
In reply to: elc11
Sun, 08-04-2013 - 10:00am

I have to admit-I'm reading 'fluff' too-but I don't think I'd admit to the fluff I read. And I never just read one book at a time-every room I sit in has at least one book in it to pick up. (the trick is to make sure they aren't the same genre-that would get confusing)

So the latest non-fluff are 2 books-the first is by Thomas King "The Inconvenient Indian" & gives a history of both Canadian & American Natives, how they were treated (in a word-badly)& essentially what justification was used to push them around the country. And yet, he manages to inject humour into what seems to be a non-humourous topic. To Canadians, it is a well-known name-he was on CBC for a long time in "The Dead Dog Cafe", teaches in Guelph University & has written many fiction books.

The other book is "Dying to be Me" & was recommended by the minister who conducted Adam's service-but it does help for anyone who has lost a loved one-& haven't we all? The author is Anita Moorjani-& I must admit I can only read a bit at a time now, but that is because my grief is rather raw yet.

As for the fluff-you are on your own!

Nora

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
In reply to: shirley_v
Sun, 08-04-2013 - 12:15pm

Nora, thanks for all your recommendations as I find them sounding to be most interesting and have made a list for when I next want to shop for some books.  I don't read as much or quickly (?) as you do but I do like to have books on hand at all times to read. 

I want to mention that I have the book "Dying to be Me" which I have read twice.  I don't know if it is proof of an afterlife but it is comforting to me to want to believe so from what she has written of her own near-death experience.  

Shirley

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
In reply to: elc11
Thu, 10-24-2013 - 6:03pm

I have just finished reading "A House in the Sky" by Amanda Lindhout who was captured by Somalians and kept in captivity for over a year - they demanding ransom from her parents (her ex-boyfriend also was with her and he too was captured and kept that long).  I must admit I was curious to know what a person endures in such an experience and there are some things that are disturbing indeed.  And yet, I suppose no one can fully appreciate the horrors just through the reading of the experience.  I was struck by the beliefs that her religious Muslim captors held - and how this affected how they treated her as a woman - which is less favourable than how they treated her ex-boyfriend, a man.  I don't know if this sort of story is everyone's cup of tea, so to speak, and I still find it hard to understand why human beings would do such horrible things as this to each other...though a different belief system surely creates their (the captors) perception of this world, and the promised  rewards of the afterlife to follow.  It does give you a glimpse into the minds of her Muslim captors but also a certain anger and desperation must fuel their desire for the money they so want to get by kidnapping western people who travel in their country.  Ms. Lindhout has managed to forgive her captors - through understanding and a desire to not want to have anger and hatred poison her own heart. 

Shirley

Avatar for shirley_v
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-29-2000
In reply to: elc11
Wed, 12-18-2013 - 11:00am

I am reading a book by the title of "My Berlin Kitchen" by Luisa Weiss.  The book's title caught my eye in a book shop a while ago and I bought it and added it to the stash of books I'm reading through.  The fact that "Berlin" was in the title was an instant grab (!) but the book is a charming memoire of a young woman who happens to actually be writing a food/cooking blog which I only found out by reading the book.  http://www.thewednesdaychef.com/  She tells of her life (though she's only in her 30s now so it' s not a long story!) and recounts as well the various foods along the way that she encountered growing up and enjoyed so much.  She definitely had a love for food/dishes and cooking that showed up at an early age.  She writes very well - so a pleasure to read just in that, but she also describes some of her favourite dishes and in such a wonderful way that you find yourself wishing you could be tasting this food as you read about it!  The fun thing is that at the end of each chapter she includes a recipe for the food she was writing about in that chapter.

This is a book that 'foodies' would enjoy but still just a pleasant read if you are interested in memoires as I am. 

Shirley

Avatar for nora_mcl
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-30-2011
In reply to: elc11
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 4:42pm

I just finished reading "Twelve Years a Slave". I do remember hearing about it as a movie-or rather, hearing the title-& wondering about it. But what a powerful book. All the more powerful because it is supposed to be true.

Canada has its own sordid history of slavery-not as long or well-known as that of the Southern states. And I know that slavery is a problem throughout the world-past and present. But I'm left thinking "How can humans treat other humans that way?" It's awful-beyond awful.

I just heard today that the movie has received several Oscar nominations-& maybe I will look into seeing the movie sometime-the book was definitely a good read. (Usually I read while knitting-there were times I'd forget to knit-the book had me fully engrossed. That's saying something! It isn't long-but it is good.)

Nora

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
In reply to: elc11
Fri, 03-21-2014 - 9:16pm

DD2 got me "The Story of the Trapp Family Singers for my birthday. It is the what The Sound of Music is based on.  I am loving it.  Even though not a profesional writer Maria does a wonderful job.

http://www.amazon.com/Story-Trapp-Family-Singers-ebook/dp/B004MMEIV4/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1395450798&sr=1-1&keywords=the+story+of+the+trapp+family+singers

Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
In reply to: suzyk2118
Sat, 03-22-2014 - 8:17am

I'm finally getting around to The Devil in the White City - well written.