Mixing it all up!

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2002
Mixing it all up!
30
Thu, 01-27-2011 - 9:34am

Do your multi-lingual kid/kids love to make up their own words combining the languages they can fluently speak?

Have you, anyone in your family, or friends been "guilty" of mixing several languages in one

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2002
Fri, 01-28-2011 - 5:09am

No.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2002
Fri, 01-28-2011 - 6:31am

Exactly!

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Fri, 01-28-2011 - 11:29am
I mix up all the time, and even worse, there are ways of saying things that I translate from French into English or vice versa. If I haven't spoken Italian in a long time, what comes out is usually Spanish but give it a few minutes and all is well again. I do try to be more disciplined about these kinds of things, though. Blame it on the kid - in order to teach him and to encourage him to speak better Indonesian and English, I have to be the good role model. My nephew hasn't quite fully gone bilingual, though. He doesn't make up new words (the argot here does that on a regular basis, which he listens to on TV and elsewhere), though he'll start in one language and switch midway with the other.

For me, there are words that always comes out in one language even though I am thinking in another language. Subscription is such a word - I have to think about it because what pops up is the French word abonnement. Until my mid-thirties, it was also very difficult for me to express anger, or to have a spat in English ~ it had to be in French to be effective! Also, I've met people at different points in my life and the first language that we spoke together with tends to be the language that we fall back to naturally, even though it might not be a native language. When this is the case, we either mix things up (use words from the other language, or start with one language and end with another) or we flip-flop between two languages.

What I do hate is when someone mixes in words from another language (that they don't really speak well) to impress others or when public figures and celebrities do so in public. It's really not impressive.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2002
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 4:23am

I have to agree with you on the anger/spat and the language you flip to for it.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2002
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 5:03am
I once had an argument in French in a Swiss Youth Hostel! It was quite impressive. I couldn't do that now. And the longest conversations I have with DH's mum are arguments in Turkish (that no we can't take all that heavy stuff that she wants to give us back home in the suitcase!!) I always say DH's Engl;sh is so good as we spend so much time arguing - and he has to argue in English!
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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2002
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 6:05am

Let me guess, does the ML want to give you food items?

I don't think my dh does very well in arguing in any language.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-06-2002
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 7:34am

Over the years she has wanted to give us some food but mostly

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 12:02pm
LOL Tulip! It is frustrating when we can't get people to know just how angry and/or frustrated we feel.

One thing that I can't do in Indonesian is cuss. Not that I swear very often in any language but I don't even know how to begin in Indonesia. Forget about slang, too. I've never been able to master that.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Mon, 01-31-2011 - 12:07pm
Moss, it isn't only about the weight and the extra luggage that you now have to pay extra for, but it's also about having even more *stuff* to deal with once we're home.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2002
Tue, 02-01-2011 - 3:35am

Is this a British Airlines of some sort?

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