"The Best & Brightest" as teachers?!

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Registered: 04-07-2002
"The Best & Brightest" as teachers?!
5
Mon, 03-16-2009 - 9:51am

I've been thinking about this a lot lately, and for the time being I am sitting on the fence.

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Registered: 03-24-2003
Mon, 03-16-2009 - 10:21am

I vote for both. I think

Sherry

 

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Registered: 04-22-2005
Sun, 03-22-2009 - 6:43pm

I don't think that being quick and having struggled in school are mutually exclusive. Attention difficulties have plagued me my entire life, but it has been mercifully offset by high intelligence, energy, and creativity. I failed the 5th grade, but won the 5th grade science fair. I dropped out of my PhD program, but with numerous awards, grants, publications, and national/international presentations.

I'm smart, but by golly I have a HARD time as a student. I think there is room for all, within reason.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Mon, 03-23-2009 - 3:30pm

Good point, and I have to agree with you! I tested as gifted- in fact, I taught myself to read at age two. But I had Asperger Syndrome, and that caused some study skills problems for me that I probably did not get around to overcoming until my first master's degree. When school required home assignments, I struggled, but I mastered the art of studentry eventually, and am now on my SECOND master's degree. I'll be finished in December!

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Beth "Petrouchka"

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 03-27-2009 - 4:22pm

I moved a lot as a kid, and so I often missed whole units in Math. It wasn't that I was bad at math, but that I never got taught certain units, and found it difficult to understand what I missed and comprehend the new stuff all at the same time.

So, I struggled with math as a kid but managed to finally understand it when I got to college. Now that I'm teaching, I find that I'm a pretty good math teacher. I know how to break it down for kids who struggle. I encourage kids to do problems in different ways. I love the use of manipulatives for everyone.

On the other hand, I've met many math teachers who were good at math as a kid. They naturally went to college to study math and now teach it. Unfortunately, many of these math teachers don't know how to break things down for kids who struggle. They often will tell their students that they simply need to memorize the algorithm and do the problems. Not all math teachers are like this, but I've run into too many.

Reading came naturally to me. I was good at it without even thinking. I don't like to teach reading because I don't know how to teach it, break it down, make it easier for those who are learning.

I guess what I'm saying is that just because a person has a quick mind at a particular subject, doesn't mean that this person will be good at teaching that subject. I think a good teacher is one who is willing to do whatever it takes to reach all learners and not just say, "this is the way it is - learn it!"

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Registered: 10-06-1997
Sat, 03-28-2009 - 5:58pm
A colleague of mine sees this phrase as an insult - we need to recruit the "best and brightest" to be the teachers of the future - as opposed to the lazy idiots we have now......

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