need some new game ideas..HELP!

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2005
need some new game ideas..HELP!
5
Wed, 10-12-2005 - 6:41am

Help!

Avatar for galena417
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-27-2003
Thu, 10-13-2005 - 8:43pm

Hi Erin,

I teach high school biology, and one game I use for reviewing concepts is Jeopardy. I have a PowerPoint file that I use, and hook up my laptop to the LCD projector. The class is broken up into 3 teams, and they can use their notes to find answers 'in the form of a question'.

You can email me through my profile if you're interested in the file...it's much easier to just change the questions & answers than to make a new one from scratch (or on poster board!)

Angela

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-17-2004
Sat, 01-21-2006 - 12:13am

I know lots of theatre and music games, but I'm not sure any of them would be useful for a spanish classroom...would you describe what you're playing now so I have an idea of what to suggest?

Liza

Community Leader
Registered: 09-14-1997
Sat, 01-21-2006 - 7:51am
How about a vocabulary word scavenger hunt? Or I have....Who has....




iVillage Member
Registered: 05-03-2005
Sat, 01-21-2006 - 8:26am
Thanks so much Angela, I also use Jeopardy at the end of each chapter to review!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-17-2004
Sat, 01-21-2006 - 3:41pm

Here are some theatre improv games that, if played in Spanish, could help kids practice their language use in a goofy way. Some of them require kids to act silly; use your discretion if you think your students can't handle the craziness....

"This is a " It would be fun for noun vocabulary.

Everyone sits in a circle, either in chairs or on the floor. To simplify explaining the dialogue part I made it a little script. Person 1 is the person who starts the game, could be the teacher or a student. Person 2 is the person sitting to their left (or right; whichever you prefer) Person 3 is the person sitting to the left of person 2( or right if you choose to go that way; play continues around the circle in the direction you started) I chose a fork as the first object, but you can use anything that can be held and passed, or you could even use pictures of things.

1: This is a fork
2: A what?
1: A fork.
2: A what?
1: A fork
2: Oh! A fork
2: This is a fork
3: A what?
2: A fork.
3: A what?
2: A fork.
3: Oh! A fork

etc., through the group.

To make it challenging, after the object gets a little ways around the circle, you add a second object, and a third etc. starting with the same first person and going the same direction. Eventually, you get to the point where they are trying to listen to one person telling them about a fork, while they are trying to talk to another person about a spoon. Great for concentration. It's a goofy little theatre game, but fun to play.

"Fruit basket" or "Animal lot" to practice nouns.

Set up a circle with enough chairs for all but one person in the group. This person is in the middle. Everyone in the circle chooses a fruit or an animal (usually you choose 3-4 for them to pick from) and then the person in the middle calls out one of the objects. Everyone that chose that animal (or you could assign people to the different groups) gets up and must trade places with other members of their group. To prevent cheating, you could make tags with the animal or fruit (maybe print them in English, but have the person in the middle say it in Spanish?) The person in the middle scrambles to find an empty seat. Whoever is left without on is in the middle and has to call out another group to try to get a seat. To get EVERYONE to move, call out Fruit Basket or Animal Lot. Then everyone must move.

One that would be fun advanced students who can do lots of conversational Spanish is one I call 'concentration' It's a one person challenge. Basically, the person has to get up and talk about one topic for 30 seconds without using any filler words like um or er. It cannot be a list of words, it must be complete sentences about the topic.

To practice verbs, you could play a game called "What are you doing?"
Two people stand up front. The rest of the class is in two lines, one on either side of the playing area. The first person starts doing any random action. The second person says "what are you doing?" The first person can answer anything except what they are actually doing or something close to it. If they are pantomiming brushing their hair, they could say "Snowboarding" The other person then starts doing whatever the first person said. The first person then asks the second "what are you doing?" and again, they must answer something that is NOT what they are doing. Make a mistake (saying something that is close to what you are doing, pausing too long before responding, not being able to come up with something when asked) and you are out, and the next person in line comes in and the game starts over.

"People to people" would work to practice names of body parts.
Everyone spreads out. The caller (probably the teacher) calls out something like 'arm to arm' They must find someone in the group with whom to touch arms. Same thing for 'head to head', 'back to back' etc., When we play it as a theater game we use it to choose partners by requiring that each pairing must be with a different person (if you chose Ed for 'back to back', you must chose another person for 'head to head') and stopping at a random place so the kids never know who their partner will be. You could play it that way, or just let them have one partner. You can also call 'people to people' and they must choose another partner.

Another idea is to create a large pair of paper dice (I found a pattern in a creative writing projects book, you might be able to find one online) and put pictures of objects on it. Roll the dice and they have to name the item that comes up in Spanish, or hold up the Spanish word. You could do the same with verbs.

I found a program online to make your own mazes, and one to create your own crossword puzzles and word searches also if you are interested in those, let me know. You could fill the right path to the center of the maze with the desired verbs or nouns (ie., conjugations of 'to be') and the other paths with verbs that they confuse with them. To find the center they must follow the correct verbs...or you could break up a sentence and spread it along the path to the center and put incorrect forms of the sentence in the other paths.

Some ideas, hope they are useful.

Liza




Edited 1/22/2006 2:02 pm ET by lizanell