Okay I have to admit this: I don't like working in Special Ed

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2003
Okay I have to admit this: I don't like working in Special Ed
6
Tue, 10-12-2010 - 6:37am

First of all, I don't know how I got hired into it when I don't have all the credentials to work with the type of kids I've been working with. Secondly, I honestly don't possess the "super sympathetic" nature it takes to be in it.

Also, so much I see going in In special education as well as regular education is just nuts. I'm sorry. I just don't like it. I'm getting out next

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-04-2000

Believe me I understand!

Sherry
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-2008

I have a son with autism and I have to say that I applaud you. I totally agree that if you as a teacher do not like working only with disabled children, to leave that and go back to a regular class. Being a special ed teacher is HARD and is not for everyone. As a parent, I much rather have my son's teacher want to be helping him and teaching him. Very often the special ed teachers/aides do not have all the help/assistance/supports they need and that makes the job even harder. It's not fair for the teachers or the students.

The only thing that concerns me is with mainstreaming. What will you do when you have disablised students in your class? Sure, the student might have an aide but you will still have to teach that student.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-04-2000

I had my first mainstreamed student thirty years ago. She had low IQ and emotional issues from abuse. I had no aide. This one student took a phenomenal amount of my time. I was either adapting or designing instructional content or dealing with behavior issues that disrupted instruction and negatively affected every other student in the class.

Sherry
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2003

I don't like being in it because I just don't agree with some of the laws and ways things are handled. Secondly, I don't like having to "diaper" kids who can "chew steak" I mean this kid I'm dealing with is darn near as tall as me, and I have to help her dress and wipe her butt. Fine for a baby, but a seven year old?? Its alot.

The biggest issue for me is that I was not trained properly to handle her or a classroom like this. I'm a regular ed classroom teacher and have had chlidren in my classroom who had emotional disorders and were autistic but could function. I've never had a chlid with severe disablities before and I know it's not for me. It's wiping me out, alot faster than having a whole classroom has wiped me out.

Believe me children in regular education can be just as challenging and I know that. But I know what's for me. In this particular class, you spend so much time teaching basic routines and giving person care, the time you have to try and teach anything is limited.

Not to mention,

Avatar for judy_joey
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003

No offense here and I AM a special education teacher, lol! The students you described are my love, they drive my desire to teach....to each his own I guess. I applaud you for really thinking about your situation and preferences AND sticking it out the remainder of the year. There is nothing worse than being left hanging...it's hard on teachers and even worse for students.

Good luck on your search to find a more desirable position!

Judy

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2003

Thanks a bunch. I've had EI and LD and even a moderately autistic child in my regular ed classrooms. I'm fine with that honestly. Its the 3 fold whammy I cant handle, physical, mental and cognitive. Sorry but so much time is spent on personal hygiene and care, it just gets in the way of teaching.

I could go on all day with this but having some time away from a regular ed classroom makes me want to go back for awhile. Anyway, I have my own theories as to why I am not equipped to do it but suffice it to say, all experience is valuable.

GT39