What Teachers Really Want to Tell Parents

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-15-2009
What Teachers Really Want to Tell Parents
23
Wed, 09-07-2011 - 5:05pm

I found this article on CNN last night, and I thought it was very interesting.

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-07-2002
Wed, 09-07-2011 - 6:56pm

I read that article and shared it on my Facebook account.

Avatar for guili12737
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-23-1997
Wed, 09-07-2011 - 10:44pm
Absolutely agree. Some parents are just crazy. One of the things I really hate about teaching is having to deal with the parents. I can't tell you how many phone calls I have made to parents and the ridiculous things they have said to me in defense of their child's awful behavior or lack of effort.
I'll go out on a limb and say every teacher on this board will agree with this article. Parents today are very hard to deal with and what's worse is not having the administration back you up because they're even more afraid of the parents.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-30-2007
Wed, 09-07-2011 - 10:56pm

I am a total lurker, but read this article in several places. I have to agree. I just left teaching after 5 years with NO hard feelings at all. I love teaching and continue to teach, just not in a classroom rather as a gymnastics coach. I have never met more whacked out parents than in my final year teaching. Some of the things that I dealt with were outrageous and there was no backing from either admin. in my building. I had parents backing their child's kicking another boy in the crotch unprovoked at recess- monitors and other kids gave identical stories. They told me it was typical boy behavior and if I had a son I would know. Fortunately, I know how to bite my tongue because that certainly required it. As if dealing with that parent reponse wasn't bad enough, my principal told me I should have kept the two boys separated. Oops, I didn't know I needed to police recess when I am not on duty. Enough rambling...

Photobucket










<
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-04-2000
Thu, 09-08-2011 - 6:07pm

I agree, twice.

Sherry
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-04-2003
Thu, 09-08-2011 - 6:13pm
Messed up people give birth to potentially messed up children. No they are not BORN messed up but their crazy environment will soon render them NUTS AND BOLTS. What these parents are defending is the lack of parenting skills and leadership on their part. THEY ARE DEFENDING THEMSELVES really. And what they cant get is that they are the only ones who are deeply and extremely emotionally bonded with that child. We dont see them the way YOU see them mom and dad. OMG!! Gotta love it.
Community Leader
Registered: 01-03-2004
Thu, 09-08-2011 - 9:05pm

Spoiled and over indulged kids become spoiled and over indulged adults. What these parents don't realize is they aren't doing their kids any favors by rescuing them from "life lessons." They are setting up their children to be failures as adulst. I know as a supervisor I've had to "upset" some "adult children" because Yes! I wrote them up! The nerve of me for doing my job by insisting they do theirs! (And we all wonder why employers rely more and more on temp services to screen and place people for jobs? Because the employer doesn't want to be sued when Johnny or Susie gets told they aren't capable of doing a job or that their attitude and behavior drag down the whole team.

Ditto for the parents who defended their child kicking another child in a sensitive area of their body as "just typical" behavior of a boy. If that child grows into an adult who attacks another person the police call it assault.

My brother runs a delivery business in a college town and sees a lot of spoiled "kids" ages 18-30. Not only do these parents actually argue with my brother about the date and time of delivery. They go so far as to dictate how a piece of furniture should be placed and how it should be assembled (if needed). I laugh because my brother is an artisan carpenter who can build a piece of furniture- from scratch- in his sleep.

When this happens my brother has a simple response: "Ok, if you know how to assemble this piece of furniture I'll go now." That usually gets a panicked response from the "adult" and pleas to put the item together. My brother says, "Sure. But you're going to leave now while I do it." And he really means it. He's also counseled kids getting the third degree from Mom about where to place a bed or dresser, "Just wait til she leaves and you can put it anywhere you want!"

I don't know when people started believing their child's lives should be free of any strife, mistakes, scraped knees or responsibility for their actions. I wonder sometimes if they are simply trying to make up for any "wrongs" that they perceived happened them when they were kids.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-11-2005
Fri, 09-09-2011 - 9:30am

I can feel for all teachers. I've been a school bus driver for 8 yrs & have to deal with the same parents. For the last 7 yrs I drove for a Head start/ECEAP program & have always gone to my parents if I'm having a problem with their child. They are the ones who know their kids not I. Because I asked a mom for her, she got it into her head I didn't like her son. She said some very unkind & untrue things in front of him & he repeated everything back to me. He questioned me about why I was stopped for a red light, road construction or another school bus. He asked if I knew the way to school and back to his house. Needless to say I didn't keep the route because of his mom & him. The teachers were very unset with this mom {it got to the point that I refused to say more then "good afternoon" "good evening" & "how was your day" to mom and she still complained to my boss [even had the boss on the bus to see what child was doing & how I entacted with him/mom, mom claimed I was rude & my boss said no Sam wasn't I was right there]}

~~Sam stitches well with others, runs with scissors in her pocket. Cheerful and stupid.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2006
Fri, 09-09-2011 - 11:05am

I think the article had some excellent points. I beleive it that there are parents out there who make excuses and get mad at teachers who make their child work too hard. That is just rediculous.





Avatar for guili12737
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-23-1997
Fri, 09-09-2011 - 11:15am

Are you a teacher, or are you just replying from a parent's point of view? Yes, we all agree that there are bad teachers out there, but the one example you give of a teacher showing R rated movies to kids, is not something that I believe happens often or ever now. I don't know how old you are but, you are speaking of something that happened when you were a kid. I know for a fact that in many districts, teachers have to have parental permission to show R rated movies to kids. Also, I have worked in districts where the superintendent has a blanket "no movies" policy, as they thought they were a waste of instructional time.
No one here is saying that all teachers are perfect. I'm a parent and my kids have had less than stellar teachers but, the point of the article was that so many parents are unreasonable and excuse their children's behavior, not that all teachers are perfect.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-03-2006
Fri, 09-09-2011 - 11:44am
No, i'm not a teacher, but that is exactly what I was trying to say. I don't think it happens often. I think MOST teachers are excellent and really care about the kids they are teaching. But, what I'm trying to say is there are teachers out there that are NOT good teachers, so I feel like it is important to be involved in my child's education and with some teacher at some point, my involvement may seem annoying. I just felt like the author of this article didn't address that in some cases there are times when parents do need to get very involved and call the teacher out on things they are teaching or doing in the classroom.

But, i did appreciate the article and it had great suggestions that I will certainly keep in mind. My MIL is a teacher and I have a close friend that is doing her student teaching and I never had even an inkling of how incredibly difficult it is to be a teacher and how thankless the job is. I am determined to make sure my children's teachers know how appreciative I am of what they do.




Pages