Will they ever grow up or wake up?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Will they ever grow up or wake up?
9
Wed, 03-29-2006 - 11:56am

Warning: This is a vent!


I am so frustrated with my education students. They are immature, irresponsible, and lazy.

Sherry

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-14-2005
Thu, 03-30-2006 - 5:01pm

I hate to overgeneralize and offend someone, but this kind of thing is exactly why I changed my major.


I have always wanted to be a high school teacher -- English or History. But when I got to college, my education classes were filled with students who were lazy and incredibly ignorant. I tutored a number of girls who want wanted to teach high school English, yet couldn't string together a complete sentence. And our history classes were pathetic -- not knowing where Egypt was located would have been pretty standard. And I was appalled by how few challenging classes we had to take as compared to History/English majors. Many of the classes we had to take were total jokes. And most of the Ed. majors I took classes with were eager to take as many of those joke classes as possible, graduating with barely a working knowledge of the subjects they were supposedly to be qualified to teach.


I was so disgusted that I changed my major to Journalism/Political Science and avoided education classes like the plague. I still want to be a teacher, but I'll do it an alternate route. Once I finish my degree next semester, I plan to find a teaching job using alternate entry (Georgia uses this method quite frequently for new teachers) then get my teaching certification or master's degree.


I'm sure there are some bright, hard-working education majors out there. But unfortunately, I don't know many.




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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-23-1997
Thu, 03-30-2006 - 5:48pm

That really is sad. They sound like my middle school students. Now that I'm at the HS level I'm not teaching regular classes so I can't really say how they are. I know my dd who is almost 16 scares me sometimes with her appalling lack of knowledge in history and geography and she a girl who gets A's and B's. Are schools dumbing material down that much?

There is an old adage "Those who can, do, those who can't, teach." I always found that offensive, but maybe it is more true now that woman (and mostly woman are teachers) have more opportunities in the workforce fewer of them choose teaching and the ones that do are not that bright. It's kind of scary.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Thu, 03-30-2006 - 7:24pm

I think you might have a valid point about other options.

Sherry

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Thu, 03-30-2006 - 7:40pm

Thanks for your comments, Annie. I'm not offended because I think you've seen why I'm so stressed. I know I ask more than many of the other instructors. I know that many think education is for anyone and takes little talent. I also know that there needs to be a system that screens these people out before they actually make it to the classroom. However, too many universities are worried about student retention because of the money so

Sherry

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-26-2000
Thu, 03-30-2006 - 8:16pm

I don't remember being like that or having people like that in my classes, either, but that was about 20 years ago.l Yeah, we short-cut if we could, but that was part of the nature of being 18 or 19.

I do have people like this in my 7th and 8th grade classes, though. I sometimes wonder how many of my students would *really* be resource kids, if they would study and do homework.

Sorry you're going through this. It seems like they should have *some* maturity.

I think, though, if I was to go to grad school at this point, I would be a lazy student. Creativity was never a strong point for me, and now it seems like my mind is starting to slow down, too. I am tired at the end of the day and have enough on my plate. I think that's one reason I never bothered to work on my master's.

Karen

 


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Avatar for guili12737
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-23-1997
Fri, 03-31-2006 - 6:58am
You don't *need* a MA to teach? I've worked in both CT and NY and you must have a MA to teach. Of course you can start out with a BA but you only have a certain number of years to complete a MA.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 03-31-2006 - 3:38pm

I'm going to piggyback on Karen because I'm in the same state.

I went to what is considered the best state university for education in our state (sorry, Karen...lol), definitely the largest (can't deny facts!) in education. I've mentioned before how at our university, students wouldn't be allowed to your tech class level if they were slackers...at most they MIGHT get into the second education in a minimum 6-semester string. You cannot enter the FIRST education class if you have less than a 2.5 GPA (which is required throughout your education) or if you have less than 30 hours. You cannot enter the second education class until you have TAKEN Praxis I (but can enter before you get your results). Then, after that, there's not a single education course you can enroll in until you have PASSED Praxis I...including the ed tech class. You have to be approved to enroll in the class and only an advisor can remove the block and can only remove it if it's cleared in the computer that you have passed. You can't student teach until you have passed ALL required Praxis tests for certification while other state universities do not require you to pass even before getting your degree! (Can't get state certification, but you'll have a degree.)

I think the Praxis requirements make the biggest difference, though GPA is pretty powerful, too.

Alysha


iVillage Member
Registered: 08-26-2000
Fri, 03-31-2006 - 5:21pm

Nope, no M.A. needed. And I'm pretty sure my life will be complete without one.

Welcome to Louisiana.

Karen

 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2003
Fri, 03-31-2006 - 8:17pm

Believe it or not,

Sherry