Any of your schools gone BYOT???

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Any of your schools gone BYOT???
7
Fri, 05-10-2013 - 7:14am

Ironically a friend from out of state was complaining about her school requiring kindles and literly 2 hours later I get the technology in our school survery from DS school district. Lured you in with questions about school website and means of communication and then the bring your own technology. Alright first red flag survery only went out to parents who provided an email. Hello if they don't have an email I'm guess kids don't have access to technology at home. We are title 1 school and so aren't all schools in town. Just the discussion of uniforms hit purse strings so much and the district realize the number of students they would need to provide uniforms too would cause a budget nightmare, so how would BYOT work?!? And families most likely NOT to have the means cannot even give their voice and the ones who can't put themselves in someone else's shoes might not totally think this thing through.

My main issues where the cost, what if it gets broke (DS broke his ipod touch after 3 weeks) lost (again know how many times the DSi has gone MIA for a few weeks) and a kid doesn't need ADHD to get distracted by the apps most of these divices allow to be downloaded.

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Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Fri, 05-10-2013 - 11:39am

I haven't heard this yet.  I have heard of some schools going completely paperless, so they get all their assignments via email or the school website, submit most assignments electronically, etc.  While I agree technology is great for kids, I think they are forgetting the whole "free and appropriate public education" and bringing your own technology, not exactly free...

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Fri, 05-10-2013 - 12:22pm

Oh another friend with older kids in high school and jr high they have on line text books. Well what do you do when you have 3 kids and 1 computer and more  then 1 needs the same night?!?!?

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Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Fri, 05-10-2013 - 4:17pm
We have had that in the past where they have a code or disc to get the textbook to use, but they also still have a paper copy of it that is used since not everyone has access to internet at home or a computer.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-16-2001
Sat, 05-11-2013 - 3:28pm

Funny I should stumble across this now, after posting on my school's FB page about the 20+ year old state history textbook my 4th grader was using for her homework.  I am so glad my daughter knows who our senators were in 1992, how many state reps we had based on the 1990 census...  Then a school board member commented, pointing out how I obviously must have no idea how expensive textbooks are.  They can't go & buy new textbooks everytime there's an election. Oddly enough, with my eldest about to start her senior year of college - I know very well how expensive textbooks are! 

Anyway - the discussion then went on to the new millage that just passed, a large chunk of which is for a technology upgrade.  Looks like they're hoping to jump onto the eBooks bandwagon as well.  Much of the focus is on the high school and they never really addressed my concern that while they're throwing money left & right to get the highschooler's established with the latest technology, how long are the gradeschoolers going to have to use 20 year old books (and counting)...    And they wonder why kids are not prepared when they reach upper grade levels?

Personally - I wouldn't mind utilizing technology.  My family is wired & networked so for us personnaly, it wouldn't really be an issue.  I do have issue with a 10 year old dragging around expensive electronics zipped into her backpack!  LOL! 

While not a title 1 district, I just looked up the stats & we have about 70% of students qualifying for free/reduced lunches... If families are struggling to provide FOOD, how are they going to afford this technology?  Are the schools going to subsidize it & provide each student with an eReader?

I don't know a good answer...

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Wed, 05-15-2013 - 7:07am

well in our state we could have gotten away with that for decades. When DS started school in 2008 we had the same senators and rep we had when I graduated in 1993!! In fact 1 of them had been in office since before I was born, other 2 elected when I was my kids age. 1 died, other just got made secretary of state so now we are having yet another special election so my kids during there school years have seen 3 senate elections where with a new senator :)

But they never used text books for state stuff. Cost too much even when I was in school. We'd get print outs. They were doing civics earlier this year and DS got a packet going over basic level state and local gov't.

My issue too with this technology is these kids future. I know from work sitting at a computer all day and the eye strain. Imagine if you have been doing that from a young age. Said it before eye dr, ear dr and orthopedics are medical fields to go in. Between ereaders, ipads, smart phones, texting and ear buds see a lot of vision, hearing and hand issues.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005
Wed, 05-22-2013 - 4:47pm

We've had online homework, with the kids being issued usernames and passwords to math drill or typing lesson sites.  Seems like that would be a real pain if you don't have the technology at home.  So far (2nd grade) they haven't issued any hardware, you're on your own or waiting on line for a seat at one of the public library computers.

Gwen

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2003
Tue, 07-02-2013 - 2:55pm

Nope, in our school the kids aren't allowed to bring electronics from home.  Every classroom has a smartboard and laptop.  There is also a computer room.  I don't think elementary kids can be trusted to take care of something so expensive as an iPad, iPod, Kindle etc.  Too easy to drop and break or to get lost or stolen.  

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