So, who's got parent/teacher conference this week?

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Registered: 05-18-2005
So, who's got parent/teacher conference this week?
5
Tue, 11-13-2012 - 11:44am

Or has had it already?  How are your dc's particular needs being met so far this year?

Gwen

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Registered: 07-23-2002

A couple of weeks ago for us. Dd13 is doing fine in math/socials/science/fitness/etc., but the one course where she's had a grade adjustment since last year (skipped in English from 8th to 10th grade level) is taught by a teacher who wasn't present the day of the conferences. So we still haven't had feedback about that, though dd thinks she's doing fine in it. She dislikes being grouped with the 9th graders for some of the organizational stuff -- like today, where they're holding a personal and social development retreat for 7-9th grades and a separate one for 10-12th grades, and she's separated from the kids she is in classes with most, the ones she considers her friends, by being lumped in with the younger kids. There's little challenge for her in math and science (she was previously accelerated in these, so no further grade-adjustment this year) but she's enjoying scoring 100s on tests. Whatever.

Ds16 continues on his previous track, so no surprises there. He's loving his senior history and science courses, is finding math easier and easier now that he understands how school courses work and how to self-pace in a steady fashion (he's the only 11th grader taking academic math). His marks are great, and getting ever higher.

Overall I think they're both finding areas of challenge though less so for dd. But they're basically happy. A few trade-offs here and there, but the compromises are working.

Miranda

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

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Registered: 05-13-1998

DS 12's are this week. It's middle school conferences so sorta different. The teachers all sit at tables and you wait in line to see the ones you want to talk to. If your child is doing well they tend to look at you like "why are you here" and the parents behind you with serious issues are annoyed both that you are taking up time and that they have to listen to the teacher glow about your child.

DS has straight "A's" and is eager and happy about school. We know all his teachers from when DD had them. They seem to like him just as much as they liked her. The school does online grading so I could check-in every day to see how he's doing if I wanted too. There really is no reason for us to go but we'll likely just go to the teachers with the shortest lines lol.

No conferences for DD 15. We got progress reports in the mail and she's got all "A's" in her high school and college classes. She met with her counsellor privately to plan next semesters college courses. That's it.

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Registered: 02-17-2004
We are 2E. Some of DS's needs are being met. Others, not so much. Cognitively, the school has a policy that he can't advance more than 18 months. So he's stuck and he's bored with the material. One of the good things that has happened though is that the teacher gave him a number of leadership roles to help him socially. He does really well when the kids come to ask him a question rather than him initiating contact. In reading, since he can read well above grade level but has trouble retelling (not comprehending, retelling in sequence), she is trying to work with him on thought organization. DS is very sensitive to stimuli - noise, chaos, smells, etc. The teacher recognizes that and allows him to come to her classroom before school instead of forcing him into the gym. This lowers his anxiety enough that he isn't overwhelmed before school even starts. He takes more social risks as a result. So it's a mixed bag for us. He's learning leadership (and really blossoming here), the kids value his ideas so he's gaining confidence, he's learning social interaction stuff. Academically, he's very frustrated. I teach him the academic stuff at home so he's in a blend-type environment this year. But it's working.
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Registered: 05-18-2005

We're 2E also.  M. isn't challenged academically except for writing (he's dysgraphic), but his marks for social/emotional development and behavior tanked this marking period.  We've just instituted a few changes to work on that, including giving him a leadership role, care of a pet, some counseling being added to his IEP.  He gets plenty of mental stimulation through his independent reading and activities outside of school, so I'm OK with his having an easy load academically while he works on his nonacademic issues.  School was a little bit slow with getting on board to help him with this, but I think we're on the right track now.

Gwen

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Registered: 12-06-2010
We've had DD 10's conference already. She's doing fine with minimal effort. She's top in math and reading, as usual, and slightly below average in essay writing and storytelling. Her essays look like lists and her stories and reports are disjointed. She has difficulties understanding that other people do not "see" the story as she is while she is telling it. Normally I don't help her with any assignments or reports, but recently I broke my own rule and helped her formulate an essay with some assistance from her teacher. We broke down the report into bits and I think she got it. She still needs work and encouragement and will still ask her sister or me to verbalize stories she wants to tell friends and family, just because it's easier. Her teachers aren't worried. I'm quite pleased with the quality of her language and math teachers this year and think DD will get more of a challenge. I like the structured atmosphere in both classes and I think DD finds comfort in that. She's still dealing with some anxieties, though that problem has improved quite a bit since the summer. In our case, what helped was the addition of a family pet, earlier bedtimes and waking times and a big breakfast as well as a home-cooked lunch sent in a thermos (DD was not eating the school lunches, and a whole year of getting her to tough it out led to her just not eating anything until late afternoon every day.) I'm not attending her violin lessons and don't know what she's doing for certain, but her teacher said she's making great progress. I trust her and have decided to let DD take the reins on what she does with violin now that she's ten. DD14 is up this week. I expect her language teachers to rave about her and her math teacher to tell me that she has test anxiety, which we all already know. Her other teachers will probably be positive as well. Where DD has really taken off is with violin. Up to now she's always stood in her younger sister's shadow, but I was shocked to.hear how well she played at her concert last weekend. She has improved beyond belief and is incredibly musical. I think she might end up considering music as more than just a hobby if this keeps up. No matter what, though, it's wonderful to see how much joy music brings her. Both kids seem to like school this year, and that's the main thing (besides the fact that they should learn something, of course. ;) )