Advice for a twice exceptional child?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2008
Advice for a twice exceptional child?
6
Tue, 08-30-2011 - 7:55pm

Hi ladies, I have a friend whose son (3rd grade) is both gifted and dyslexic. From what I understand, the dyslexia is a new diagnosis/discovery. I think they are struggling right now to find the right type of school for him. The public school that our kids attend ran out of ideas and his new school seems to be geared more to those with learning disabilities, but not to those who are also gifted.

I understand it can be a hard combination to work with for teachers who are not educated in this unique combination of traits. Is there any advice, tips, words of wisdom, or support you can provide? I'm going to give her a link to the board because I know that there are several of you who have experience in this area.

Thanks so much!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2008
Mon, 09-26-2011 - 1:53pm
Thanks so much everyone! I'll be sure to pass all of this excellent information along to her!

I have to say, until last month, I had never heard about vision therapy. I can't even imagine how many kids and adults would have benefited from something like this in the past.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
Sun, 09-25-2011 - 5:43pm
If he has not been tested to see if he needs vision therapy, he should be tested by a developmental optometrist. Kids with tracking issues (can't focus both eyes on a word, and may appear to have lazy eye,) will present as though they have dyslexia due to double vision. Schools will not check for this, will not pay for it, but if coded as lazy eye, a medical condition, medical insurance will pay for it. (But not usually vision insurance, which is why it needs to be coded as a medical issue.)

Like others, I am homeschooling my twice exceptional student. If she can't, she needs to be very firm with the school about putting him resources that he may need (if it isn't vision therapy) while at the same time putting him with gifted kids. They may need the kids to take notes or read to him, but that is not a bad thing for them to help each other.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2003
Tue, 09-20-2011 - 12:33pm
I too don't get the "run out of ideas" excuse. Was your friend's DS evaluated for a 504 plan or an IEP? Students need to have an educational need for an IEP, whereas 504 plans are for any student w/ disabilities.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2005
Fri, 09-02-2011 - 10:00am

I think it really depends on the school, but we've always had better luck with the public schools because they have the resources for the non-gifted stuff. I know my ds11 could do well academically at a gifted school, but I don't know that he'd get the support with speech and language that he needs.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005
Wed, 08-31-2011 - 3:10pm

For M., we put him at the appropriate level of academic challenge but also enlisted support services for his delayed/problematic areas.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Tue, 08-30-2011 - 9:20pm

I can't really offer any advice (because we homeschool my dd17, who is probably 2E, dyslexic and with some very strong gifts, although possibly not globally enought to be considered gifted, but certainly qutie bright), but the one thing I'd try do above all others is to enable the child to resist accepting the cruel and thoughtless and unsolicited assesments of the child's ability and prospects.