Age-appropriate reading materials

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2013
Age-appropriate reading materials
5
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 12:00am

I am in a dilemma here.  Every night at bedtime, I read Josh 2 pages out of his facts book, then we read what I call 'enjoyment' reading.  Right now we are reading "School of Fear" which he is loving, it uses very descriptive and advanced vocabulary but he seems to know most of the words and will laugh and the next day when we start the next 2 chapters, he will recall where we left off and what was happening.  The book before this one was "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" which he loved and we read it very fast.  I dug out the DVD which he had never seen and we watched it after we had finished the book.  He said he liked the movie better because it brought the book to life.  At one point in the movie, he exclamed, "That was exactly the same line in the book!"  He grabbed the book and searched through it until he found that line to show me,  "See, Mommy?  I told you so!"

So yesterday he was asking me what books had been made into movies because now he wants to read the books first, then watch the movies.  He is wanting to read Harry Potter, he has seen the later movies but he was undiagnosed with his ADHD and not on meds and has never watched the first few.  I have had another teacher tell me he is too young for Harry Potter, even the first book.  He is really liking "School of Fear" which is for 4th graders and up, I don't see why not on Harry Potter.  Another book he is interested in is "The Hunger Games" he knows I have it on my Kindle, we watched the movie trailer for it the other night and now he is determined that we will read it too.

He likes funny books, fantasy books, and I think he would like books where he can solve things, like Nancy Drew or Encyclopedia Brown.  We have read the entire Fudge series, by Judy Blume and we even read "Superfudge" twice.  I read him "Ramona the Pest" and he identified with Ramona but just wasn't as interested in that.  I also read him the first 2 Boxcar Children books, but he told me the kids were boring in those books, not enough action or comedy, or drama.

What say you all on the Harry Potters and Hunger Games?

Blessings, Michelle

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2013
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 5:47pm

Thanks so much.  Wow, I had to log in twice to post here.  My netbook runs this site really slow, I got on my big PC earlier today and it ran so much better.  I've not been a good copier/paster on my Netbook either, so I will look up that link when I can get back on my PC.

I see your point about "The Hunger Games", my 15 y.o. tried to read it when it first came out and only made it through chapter 2, said he couldn't get into it and thought the movie was horrible.  I didn't much care for the movie either, mainly because it didn't get into some of the key character's lives (Gail's) and the relationship he and Katniss had....anyway, I digress.

I will check out those reading materials too, thanks again!

Blessings, Michelle

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 1:07pm
And, "All My Best Friends are Books" is a good resource too.
Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 1:05pm

This is a difficult question to answer as every family has their personal threshold on what's appropriate for their own children. Harry Potter? Both mine read the first two books at 5 (though DS read it with Dad.) However, both chose to put off book 3 until they were older because, as my DD put it, was "too full of despair." By the time they'd got to Potter, they'd already read and been exposed to a lot of the fantasy genre like the Narnia books, Wizard of Oz series, Wrinkle in Time series, stand alone books about ogres and witches. Potter wasn't anything new.

I think "The Hunger Games" came out when DD was 10 or 11 and a teacher recommended it for her. She really liked it but surprisingly, my DS who has always had a much higher threshold for action adventure violence found it terribly disturbing and won't read the rest of the series even at age 12. When you are dealing with witches, wizards and superheros, there is a clear understanding that "this can't happen." With "The Hunger Games"... all one has to do is catch the evening news to see armies of real children.

Personally, I'd not want my 5-year-old reading "The Hunger Games." Children killing children for the entertainment of adults.... not something I am particularly comfortable reading nor having my little children contemplating. Potter? Depends on all the players. Obviously, I was OK with my own reading them but I also understand why others chose hold off. There are so many great books and series for children, it's really pretty easy to find material that works with your own child and individual family thresholds.

Here is a long list of books turned into movies. Lots of options.

http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/books-made-into-movies

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2013
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 1:04pm

Thanks so much!  I had completely forgotten about "Charlotte's Web"!  Great book, yes, I will have to write all these down and look them up on Amazon to see if any of them might be freebies for my Kindle.  I started to read him "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" but the book starts off really slow and he stopped me on chapter 2 and said he just wasn't feeling it.  He definitely knows what he likes and what he doesn't like. 

Blessings, Michelle

Avatar for turtleemom
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-25-2007
Thu, 01-24-2013 - 12:30pm

The Complete Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, Wind in the Willows, Trumpet of the Swan, Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little, Black Stallion, Nathaniel Fludd Beastologist series,  Mouse and the Motorcycle, D'Aulaires Book of Greek or Norse Myths, Kenny and the Dragon, Bunnicula, The Enourmous Egg, Mr Popper's Penguins, Ginger Pye, The Borrowers, The James Herriot Treasury for Children, the Wizard of Oz,  Cappyboppy, My Father's Dragon, Shel Siverstein, and Jack Prelutsky would be my suggested book list.  I would also strorgly suggest the Jim Trelease read-Aloud Handbook as a great reference guide for yourself.