Dysgraphia

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-04-2003
Dysgraphia
12
Fri, 04-29-2011 - 10:02am

I've seen a lot of chatter on this board about

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Sat, 04-30-2011 - 12:04am
My ds (14) seems clearly dysgraphic. He's still awaiting assessment through our school system, and is homeschooled, which has allowed endless accommodations with no fuss. So I don't have much wisdom to offer at this point, I'm afraid.

However I did want to point out that dysgraphia is more a catch-all diagnosis of symptom (trouble writing) than an identification of a cause of the symptoms. The difficulty could be anywhere along the pathway from idea to language to motor planning to muscle strength and dexterity to proprioceptive or visual feedback, integration and refinement. So OT issues can definitely cause or contribute to dysgraphia, as can more central difficulties.

Hope others will have more experience and wisdom to offer!

Miranda

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Sat, 04-30-2011 - 10:14am

My son was tested by an OT at age 7.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Mon, 05-02-2011 - 7:49pm
I call "Bull!" on being too old for OT to help! In reality though, typing is probably the best thing to help.

My son is almost 9. He has been diagnosed with apraxia (speech) and then later, changed to motor delays. He started speech at 3, OT at 4 and OT did not help but was fun. At 8 we got him vision therapy for convergence issues (he could not move his eyes together and was seeing in double vision.) We also homeschool, and writing was pretty non-existent for him. He would do everything verbally. After vision therapy (for fine muscle control again) the writing has improved greatly, and OT is finally helping. BUT, we had to go back to square one with spelling. I started him out this year will two letter words, typing, printing and in cursive. It is finally making a difference. Because we do state testing, I did get him tested and got the same result you did, which means he gets accommodations. He ended up getting a Fusion word processor with word prediction that he is allowed to use on state testing. Unfortunately they "thought" they had no money, so he just got it, and it is not in the IEP for this year. I also just found out that the state tests here are not all fill in the bubble (which he does really well with,) they have writing also. So, I told him to fill in the bubbles, and then go back and do the writing if he wants.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Wed, 05-04-2011 - 10:38am

My DS who resisted writing turned out to have both significant fine motor delays and vision issues.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Wed, 05-04-2011 - 12:08pm

I wish we could afford vision therapy, which I think my son needs, and maybe OT, but we are already paying over $100 a month in co-pays for physical therapy for my son's scoliosis and back pain.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Wed, 05-04-2011 - 12:42pm

Didn't you say in another thread that he has not only an iPhone but also an iPad and a netbook? I'm curious why he would use the iPhone for the test and not one of the other (IMO) more appropriate tools? Is it because the iPhone is more discrete? I would suggest not enabling his desire to hide his disabilities, because he needs to learn through experience that if you are honest and unashamed, people will react with acceptance and support. After all, even though you're struggling to pay for gas to get to his appointments, you've spent a small fortune on tools he can use to compensate for his challenges: why not use them more fully?

Miranda

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Thu, 05-05-2011 - 6:22pm

His iPhone uses 3G.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Thu, 05-05-2011 - 7:25pm

Well, it's just that you mentioned that he types at 50 wpm. I would have thought typing on the netbook, saving onto a memory stick and handing that in would be the easiest and most logical solution. That's typically what the kids in the schools around here do. Sorry, it was just a suggestion.

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Tue, 05-10-2011 - 11:19am

My son took the test yesterday and the iPhone worked very well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-08-2004
In reply to: kdoerpholz
Sun, 05-22-2011 - 6:34pm

My son who is 10 and has Dyslexia was in OT for a weak fine motor which affected his handwriting for 2 years.

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