Education plans for summer

Community Leader
Registered: 11-12-2008
Education plans for summer
6
Thu, 03-22-2012 - 11:28am

Hi, everyone!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 8:35am

We'll probably join the local library's summer reading club again, and pick up one of those summer bridge activity books just so he doesn't get too rusty.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-09-2006
Fri, 03-23-2012 - 8:26pm
Not sure yet...dd14 is saying she wants to go on a visit back home rather than Scout horse camp. dd18 has a week gig as counselor at diabetes camp, but she may be a lifeguard there instead...still working on that. And she's thinking that she may apply to be a Scout camp counselor for the rest of the summer. ds20 will probably work, but not sure if if it will be here or in his college town. dh has a handful of new projects that will probably keep his nose to the grindstone for months. And I'm working on organizing the house/garage (which seems to have gone way out of control) and finishing some work projects because my boss may be retiring as early as the first of August and no one else is interested in them being funded. So, not much exciting planned for now...

Deborah
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-06-2010
Fri, 03-23-2012 - 3:05am
I guess we could use summer for academics, but the kids and I just enjoy our down time too much. I see summer break as a time to spend the whole day outdoors, take long bike tours, travel, play with friends. The kids end up making huge leaps in their foreign language skills and gain a broader cultural understanding, which is worth any amount of academics for us in the long run. I also think that the benefits of extended daily physical exercise are incredibly important. I love it when my 9-year-old crashes on the couch at half past seven in the evening because she's been on her bike or in the water all day. We also use summer break as a time to complete longer projects that we wouldn't have time to do throughout the school year. That's the big disadvantage to not being able to homeschool.

The one concession I may make to no academics is a bit of French for ODD (13) and a bit of math for YDD. ODD's French program quickly grows very demanding, with a sizeable number of kids flunking out. I know from experience that if you have a solid background after your first year, you can just continue to ride the wave. As for YDD, she's in pullout gifted math, which retests at the beginning of every year. Only the kids whose parents do academics with them during the summer will make it into the program, so DD is going to want to practice. I don't anticipate doing more than an hour a week of either activity, though.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Thu, 03-22-2012 - 3:23pm

We math, spelling, and grammar over the summer.

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2002
Thu, 03-22-2012 - 2:34pm

We've been mostly an unschooling family, so our summers are really no different from the rest of the year, except that over the years they've been an opportunity to participate in some wonderful music, theatre and martial arts programs. This year with two kids in school I don't foresee much difference. The kids will do a week or two of music workshop. Maybe another week of sports- or arts-related camp. Nothing else structured, though. I'm a big believer in fallow time. I find it's what my kids need in order to recharge, enjoy themselves, fire up their imaginations, and become fully self-motivated creative thinkers and doers.

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Thu, 03-22-2012 - 12:20pm

My kids rarely choose academic things in the summer. I throw a little writing at DS 11 occasionally because he struggles greatly with penmanship and going a full summer without picking up a pencil is bad news come fall. Last summer he chose to complete the 6th grade math curriculum so he could start 6th grade in pre-algebra. DD 15 did the same thing prior to 6th grade. She took a summer when she was 5 to learn cursive and last year she took a high school summer playwriting course. In high school, they usually have summer required reading and an essay to do. That's about it for the academic things they have ever done in summer over the years.

They spend their summers doing interest based activities (which can suck up 20-30 hours a week) and relaxing.