Handwriting?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
Handwriting?
11
Sat, 10-23-2010 - 4:11pm

DD Y has lots of problems with her handwriting (not neat enough, sometimes illegible). I've heard this is a common gifted child problem, as their hand never moves quick enough for their thoughts. Do you recognize this in your child? Did he or she get extra help or attention for it?

Suzanne

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2002
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 11-02-2010 - 10:49am
My son had some motor skills issues because of a mild disability that causes muscle weakness. He was able to read books at a 5th grade level in kindergarten and do math, but he didn't color in the lines very well. At the end of the year his teacher suggested sending him to transitional first grade (a year in between kindergarten and first grade) the next year because he couldn't color in the lines. He could write, but his writing was very sloppy. He was not eligible for OT even though he has a disability because he was not failing. He wrote in his paper that I "went crazy" after the kindergarten teacher's suggestion and decided to homeschool.

My son is now 12 and taking his first classes with other kids since he finished kindergarten. He has discovered that he is very good at creative writing. He has received A+ on every one of his papers. The last one he wrote had to be about the best mistake he ever made. He wrote that not coloring in the lines was the best mistake he ever made because it led to homeschooling.

He is allowed to type most of his assignments in the co-op writing composition class but he still has to write at least a paragraph in about 5 minutes as a warm-up exercise at the beginning of each class. He is never finished by the time the teacher moves on to the lesson which requires a lot of note taking. I am the parent volunteer for the class so I take notes (usually about two pages) while he finishes his paragraph and this works out well. They don't allow iPads or laptops at our co-op for some reason. I don't think he will have any problems because of his dysgraphia when he goes to college because he will be allowed to use these for taking notes.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
In reply to: suuzzzy
Sun, 10-31-2010 - 7:06pm
I do think it's the second....her ideas race too fast, too fast to tell it to others (she stumbles over sentences, forgets parts of sentences) and too fast to write them all down. If she does, she uses rich and complex sentences....
Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
In reply to: suuzzzy
Sun, 10-31-2010 - 7:01pm

Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-10-2003
In reply to: suuzzzy
Thu, 10-28-2010 - 1:17pm

Hi,

I have a 10 year old son who is gifted but also has dysgraphia.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-1999
In reply to: suuzzzy
Wed, 10-27-2010 - 6:49am

I completely agree with you.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 10-26-2010 - 7:08pm
I think your first point is a good one, but of course one that teachers will say is why they should take points off...so the kid will continue to work on it... The second point makes me wonder if I should open up that discussion. I strongly believe academically and socially the best thing you can do is treat an accelerated child like his/her class mates. But motor skills, both gross and fine, are different. They cannot be 'forced', focussing on it will not make them develop much quicker: it just takes a LOT of practice and experience, something that does come with age... DDs old school was very firm in this matter: they strongly believed children should not start writing until they were 6 years old, before that they had to make big movements, circles, drawings, but not fine print. They said if you started practicing that too soon it would only give cramped up fingers and sloppy writing. They actually gave DD the opportunity to write as a kindergardener... But later on they focused on learning to write neatly as 'there's something you can still learn from us' kind of thing. That did not help DDs attitude/motivation at all!
Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 10-26-2010 - 6:59pm
You're right, it's not so much a 'gifted' issue but more an 'accelerated/grade skipping' child issue...
Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 10-26-2010 - 6:58pm
oh typing would definitely help. But it'll definitely set DD apart from the rest who do now type...not sure school is willing to do that. But it's worth asking about, I think in a month we'll get our first parent-teacher night with DDs mentor...
Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-1999
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 10-26-2010 - 11:59am

I would not emphasize the age difference because (1) it may not be relevant (my husband still has serious handwriting issues) and (2) you may unwittingly raise the hackles of a teacher who believes that a kid accelerated into a higher level class should be able to meet the challenges--all of them--of that higher level class.

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
In reply to: suuzzzy
Tue, 10-26-2010 - 11:21am

My 10-year-old has terrible handwriting as well. He does work on it and it just doesn't get better. However, at school, he is allowed to type most everything starting when he was in 3rd grade

Pages