Happy Newyear and the first QOTW of 2011: study skills/challenges

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
Happy Newyear and the first QOTW of 2011: study skills/challenges
6
Wed, 01-05-2011 - 6:53pm

Hope you all had wonderful holidays and 2011 has started smoothly and nicely for you...

First question of the week for the year:

What skills for studying/doing school work/learning are a challenge for your gifted child? Do you (try to) help him/her in any way to master those skills?

Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-21-2003

Organization has always been a problem for my 14-yo DD. It hasn't really affected her grades until this year, her first year of high school. She's in a nonsemestered school, meaning she has to keep track of 8 courses at all times. It's not ideal for someone like her, but she wanted to stay in the gifted program, making this school the only choice. She had a couple of nasty surprises in her interim report card and has since stepped up her game, so overall she's doing quite well. Still, it's been a massive adjustment for her.

She doesn't accept my help very well, so for the time being my husband is the one in charge of guiding her "organizational development." He's set up a large erasable calendar in his office and has her write down upcoming exams/projects on it. It seems to be helping.

On a positive note, she has made many friends at the school, got the lead singing role in two (extracurricular) theatre productions, and started a successful Scrabble club. Her overall confidence has gone way up.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-06-2010

My older DD, 12, still struggles to work consciously in the way you describe your older daughter working. It's a pretty serious problem for her - in the classes she dislikes, at least. " I

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Registered: 08-04-2003
Right now the general concession is that DS is 2E and has ADD, but we'll know more early next month once we wrap up his nuero-pysch testing this month.

Regardless this executive skills are not where they should be (unless it's something he wants to do 150%, which isn't anything related to school), so we're working on those in general. Thankfully he isn't doing anything in school right now that is a challenge for him, so the lack of executive skills aren't affecting his work. But that being said his work (although correct) is terribly sloppy and has little effort in it.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2009
For DD L (11) there aren't many study skill issues at the moment. She's a conscious worker, well organized, doesn't take her perfectionism too far, 'calculates' what she has to do for a good grade. The only thing for her is to recognize when she's not in a productive setting and to know how to get out of it (for example she can't get much done during school work hours, because she's more occupied with her classmates and if they need help etc.)

DD Y (10) is very unorganized and doesn't finish one thing before she starts another. And then she looses a lot of time with hopping from one thing to another and back, finding things back, organizing her school materials etc. She still has motor issues, cannot sit still while working, needs to bounce around every few minutes. But her way to deal with it is not ideal: it's to talk to her self in a whispering voice, and saying everything she does to 'herself' that way. 'ok that was the first assignment, now on the the next, oh tomorrow I have a Latin test, where's my book, hey my ruler is on the ground, I needed that for math, oh mommy did you know I got a grade back today' etc etc. Drives DD L batty as she tries to do her homework on the other side of the table. I try to help Y out by asking her questions but telling her not to answer me out loud, just do something with the question if needed...
Suzanne
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-18-2005

My barely 5-year-old has the attention span of a flea, unless something has deeply captured his interest, in which case he can persist at it for hours.

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Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
My kids have sort of opposite problems in this area.

DS (10) always takes the easy path. He feels his first try should always be sufficient and it's always bare minimum. If he is corrected or anyone suggests that he try to improve, he has a meltdown. However, with some handholding and encouragement, he will work harder and is then immensely proud of the outcome.

DD(13) over-analyzes everything and turns what should be a simple walks into a trip up Everest. It's actually causing some problems this year in physics. It's not coming easily and her response is that it must be harder than it seems and thus she's not getting it. We're just trying to give her some space to figure it out as our involvement seems to add undue anxiety.