Hi! I'm new here.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-27-2011
Hi! I'm new here.
15
Wed, 04-27-2011 - 1:00pm

My name is Debbie and I am mother to two wonderful children, a 7 year old daughter and 4 year old son.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2007
Sat, 05-28-2011 - 11:53am

Chiming in late here, but I am surprised your school has but one assessment kit for the DRA. The DRA assessment kit comes in two levels: K-3, and 4-8. The lower kit goes through level 38, the ending third grade level, and the upper kit tests through level 80, upper middle school. Unless of course they are using an older kit, but those definitely went to the fifth grade reading level.

Some schools will set a ceiling to test each child. When my daughter was in first grade, they would only test through level 44, mid fourth grade, and no higher. So at the beginning of the year, her report card said she read at level 44, and for the rest of the year it said 44+.

As a teacher, I understand setting a ceiling simply because we have to test each child individually, and DRAs take a long time to administer, especially at the higher levels as compared to other reading assessments, but as a parent, I want to see growth regardless. Ask what your school's poilicy is. If they have set a ceiling on how high they will test, ask for a reading specialist or some other staff member to administer the test as high as your daughter can read.

At our school, there are typically a number of kids who leave first grade reading several grade levels above. It is then somewhat easier as a teacher to deal with, because those children can work in a group on entirely different work. We have 11 children this year finishing the first year with DRA levels of 38 or higher! More than normal, but exciting nonetheless!

Depending on your school, that may or may not be typical. Sometimes, it may not appear that there are other choldren at the same level as your daughter, simply because her peers may not show their abilities in the same way.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-27-2011
Sat, 05-28-2011 - 11:26pm

Thanks for your response. My daughter is by far the best reader in her class.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-28-2011
Thu, 06-09-2011 - 5:58pm

Why you just described my Ladoo.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2005
Wed, 07-06-2011 - 9:58am

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-07-2011
Thu, 07-07-2011 - 5:23pm

Hi there!

Your post was really interesting to me because she sounds very much like my daughter. However, when mine is bored, she gets into trouble, which was a big reason for homeschooling. We have enjoyed the endless flow of stimulating information that is appropriate for her abilities. She is 8 and reads on at least a high school level, correcting me when I read aloud. :D

There are a bunch of great materials that are considered homeschooling materials, but that make excellent supplements even for children going to school. I think my favorite batch comes from Susan Wise Bauer, author of A Well Trained Mind. Her materials focus on world history and language arts. I have gone through the first two volumes of The Story of the World with my children, which is a classical approach to world history, but written to the elementary-age student. Even my kinders loved it, and last year I had kids running around playing "the invaders of Rome" and "Julius Caesar visits Egypt." Her language arts materials are very basic, but again focused on using the classics in literature to teach writing. Each volume comes equipped with about 36 book or short story recommendations for reading, and passages from them are used in the exercises.

Her website is www.peachillpress.com.

Hope this helps! I love English, so these are my recommendations for at-home enjoyment.

Madreathome

FREE Parent Resources and Online Classroom Demonstration at www.awtutor.com.



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