IEP was this morning

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Registered: 09-30-2011
IEP was this morning
6
Wed, 03-13-2013 - 2:52pm

I posted this on the "Special Education" board but thought I'd post it here as well. Since my son is "twice-exceptional" (like a lot of your kiddos), he kinda fits on both boards.

We had my youngest son's yearly IEP meeting this morning. No matter how many times I've done this, I STILL feel slightly intimidated each time- I'm getting better, though! It's mostly because I'm always outnumbered. My awesome husband always goes with me so that definitely helps. In my son's more "challenging" years when we butted heads with the school trying to get him the right services, I would try to bring an additional person for "my side" as well- his private speech therapist, for example. I'm curious as to how many people are usually at one of your children's IEP meetings? **That is, if you have IEP meetings for gifted- I have friends in other states where it's done differently** Today, I (silently) counted 7 people in addition to DH and I. There was a special education teacher who kind of lead the meeting, his gifted teacher, his regular mainstream teacher, his speech therapist, his occupational therapist, the talented music teacher, and a "technology resource teacher". 

Overall, things went pretty smoothly- my son has come a looonnnggg way! He will be keeping his gifted classes and speech therapy. He will lose his OT because he's now accomplished all of his goals- bittersweet b/c his OT has been with him for years and was one of the few people who really "got"/ understood my son. He will be gaining talented music because he just recently was evaluated and qualified for that. It will be once a week, for 2 hours.

Someday I'll have to post about our previous not-so-smooth IEP meetings. I remember writing about them so I'm certain I still have it in a Word doc somewhere...

Lisa 

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Registered: 09-30-2011
Fri, 03-15-2013 - 11:08am

Miranda- thank you!! That is an excellent way to look at it! I think I was in the "us vs them" mentality for so long that I was forgetting to look at the big picture.

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Registered: 07-23-2002
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 3:54pm

I understand how that must feel intimidating, especially with a history of having to really fight to get a child's needs recognized and met. On the other hand, if I was going to design the ideal consultation process on a meeting a quirky child's needs, I would want all the various teachers / parents / staff / ancillary educational providers to meet together to listen, discuss, brainstorm, synthesize, plan and reach a holistic understanding.

The big picture. Various perspectives. Coming together. That's all really good stuff. Obviously if it feels like "me against them" or like the non-parents are all united in a particular agenda, then it's not a great environment for solving problems. But I think that theoretically, with open minds and a collaborative mentality on all sides, it's also the best possible approach.

Miranda

Miranda
in rural BC, Canada
mom to three great kids and one great grown-up
unschooler, violist, runner, doc 

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Registered: 05-02-2004
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 2:11pm

My oldest son would certainly qualify for gifted and the IEP.   He gets OT and Speech, and has accomodations for written expressive disorder.   Talking to him, (other than that speech stuff) you wouldn't know that he has an IEP and issues.  It is only when you ask him to write down what he has just talked about that you would see what the issue is.

Here, part of the qualifying for the gifted program is acing the MAP test, an online multiple choice test.   My son (after we got him vision therapy) has always scored in the highest levels and has a lexile score about 5 grades above his current grade.   I haven't tried to get him into the gifted program however as we basically do a charter school with the district and we do gifted every day at home.   They don't consider the state testing for the gifted program - which would disqualify him as he has such a horribly hard time with the writing (and both math and English require writing) and his scores are usually below profiecent.  If he could have a scribe, he would be acing that one, but here they don't let you have a scribe or speech to text unless you can't hold a pencil.   Yet, in the real world, if a person wants to use speech to text, or have a secretary take shorthand, that is perfectly fine.

Avatar for cmlisab
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Registered: 09-30-2011
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:37am

"Facing the Star Chamber" - LOL! I love it!

Singrorge- That is EXACTLY what our previous "not-so-smooth" IEP battles..er meetings were about. The school apparently had never encountered a "twice-exceptional" kid before (I guess?)  and just couldn't wrap their minds around that he needed services from both ends of the spectrum. 

Lisa 

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Registered: 05-18-2005
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 11:24am

I think of it as "facing the Star Chamber", LOL.  Even when we have made appointments specifically to see his classroom teacher or his social worker, sometimes we are met by a full panel.  We get principal, classroom teacher, OT, social worker, school psychologist, special ed. coordinator, etc.  Sometimes we bring my FIL along for moral support and jargon interpretation, he's a speech therapist who works for the Dept. of Ed.  They don't do gifted IEP's here.  Ours was originally for fine motor delays, we've evolved to formal diagnoses of Asperger's and Developmental Coordination Disorder.  We're still in the nightmare stage of trying to get appropriate placement and services for our child.  They are currently still in denial about how a 30-child classroom of 7-8 yo's is a great place for a kid with a college level reading score and the social/emotional/writing skills of a 4 year-old.

Gwen

 

Gwen

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Registered: 04-16-2001
Thu, 03-14-2013 - 8:55am

Glad to hear it went well.  No Gifted IEPs in our schools, and IEPs are limited to those with signficant learning disabilities.   Great you have the support for both and that the school is honoring him as a "twice exceptional" kid. It is much harder here to have a kid in both gifted and with an IEP, if the IEP is for an LD (not sure about autism however).  To qualify, the learning disabilities generally have to be causing the student to score very low on standardized tests.  A gifted kid is most likely going to be able to score within the typical range, even though it is not where they should score based on IQ.