What's everyone reading these days?

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Registered: 05-13-1998
What's everyone reading these days?
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Fri, 03-02-2012 - 10:15am

It's fun to share what the family is reading once in awhile. Let us know what you've enjoyed, what you haven't. What are your kids reading? Are they obsessed with a series?

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Avatar for turtletime
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Registered: 05-13-1998
Wed, 03-28-2012 - 11:59am
Don't envy us! My eldest is a passionate reader but my DS 11 hardly reads at all. He is an excellent reader in 2 languages. He certainly enjoys the material as he's reading but it's just not something he'd ever choose for himself. There have been summers I've said "I don't care what you read but read SOMETHING by September!" He'll get turned on by a series and plow through the entire set in a week or two then not touch another book for months. He's extremely extroverted and doesn't see the point in any solo activity and never has.

It drives me crazy too!
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Registered: 01-05-2000
Tue, 03-27-2012 - 6:28pm

Thanks, I needed that.

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

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Registered: 12-06-2010
Tue, 03-27-2012 - 1:50pm
Chris, my DH is like that. I've known him for twenty years, and he has never read a work of fiction in that time, though he did read and enjoy stories when he was younger, he says. He's an engineer, and he's kinda brilliant, if I do say so myself. But he'd rather read books about dogs or gardening or feng shui or techie stuff than fiction.

My YDD is not as extreme, but she's similar to him. She's in accelerated math and loves watching science documentaries. She will read fiction, but I try to keep her stocked with the nonfiction options she prefers. Books about science are good, but she also likes history.

What has helped YDD is reading out loud. She does a page, I do a page. She gets excited when I read with expression and tries to make the characters "come alive" when it's her turn.
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Registered: 01-05-2000
Tue, 03-27-2012 - 11:54am

In some ways, i envy all of you.

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

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Registered: 12-06-2010
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 1:36pm
And as an aside - DD 13 borrowed my Kindle yesterday and has had her nose buried in the Hunger Games ever since. If she keeps it up, she'll be done before bedtime!
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Registered: 12-06-2010
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 1:33pm
I agree - it's not so much a matter of vocabulary and reading comprehension, it's about the historical context of the story and the sociological issues surrounding it that strike me as being beyond a five-year-old's life experience. But maybe she just likes being read to, and maybe the characters really spring to life for her. In my opinion, the most important reading skill early readers need to develop is the "cinema effect" - when books become like films running in the reader's head. I can't say exactly when this happened for my DDs, but I do remember looking at them at one point and thinking, "yup, the reels are running!"
Avatar for turtletime
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Registered: 05-13-1998
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 10:23am

My DD snuck a copy of To Kill a Mockingbird at 9 against my wishes but did come forward as she wanted to talk about it. I found that while her comprehension was high in general, she didn't get the alleged "rape" at all. In her 9 year old imagination, she thought he'd jbeen accused of hitting her.

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Registered: 01-05-2005
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 9:40am

Wow, I can think of a lot of things I would want my 5-year-old to read (at an equally high reading level, if that's the draw) before TKAM. My kids are not particularly sheltered or naive, but I wouldn't want to purposely set out to raise the issues of rape and racism with my child at that age.

Wow - I've been debating whether my ds11 (12 soon) should read this. They will in 8th grade, and it's one of my all-time favorites (I just re-read it). Dd19 re-read it a few years ago and left notes to ds11 in the margins (knowing that our gifted MS program requires it).

I dislike much of what Focus on the Family does, and I actually bought dd19 an "I read banned books" bracelet (the links were covers of banned books) but I can't even imagine a 5-year old reading this. Maybe I just don't understand - my kids are cognitively gifted, but I think emotionally, they're fairly age-level. However, as you point out, there are LOTS of great writings out there that don't deal with these types of topics.



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Registered: 05-18-2005
Mon, 03-26-2012 - 8:41am

M. has finally gotten off his "nothing but Magic Treehouse" kick.

http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc248/gwennyc/b6yfcl.png<A href="http://s218.photobucket

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Registered: 03-07-2012
Tue, 03-13-2012 - 7:16pm
My kids already have seen the harm done by Focus on the Family. Plus, this is the child who reads law journals if she can.

I would not let her read it on her own, but with her dad or me, I am fine with it.

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