Are your cs's media suave?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Are your cs's media suave?
8
Thu, 08-23-2012 - 7:53am
My ds reads a lot of news on the Internet, but I don't think he understands the sources of what he is reading. When he tells me some story I always say where did you read that, and he gets furious. He says "I understand the Internet much better than you do. I know the difference between a legitimate web page and a one that is not legit.". Then I say but I just want you understand the source and recognize their slant on the story. For instance he quoted me a story about elections in the US and how they were screwed up and his source turned out to be Russia Today. (note that he wasn't even sure of the source until i made him go back and look it up) I said that there may be some truth to the story, but you must consider that Russia Today has a communist slant and wants to show that things are messed up in the capitalist US. He really thinks he is quite suave, but to me he seems so naive.
Avatar for suzyk2118
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-30-1997
Thu, 08-23-2012 - 8:00am

Not sure about suave; he's the kind to doubt most he reads on the web! (esp since about 6th or 7th grade when he and some buddies found they could easily alter what was on Wikipedia)

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-25-2006
Fri, 08-24-2012 - 3:15pm

Hmmm.....I have to commend your son for reading various sources.  Too many of us Americans don't read, or read/watch/listen to only one or two sources; most probably only watch TV.  I just took a look at RT and it does appear that it's lefter than most big newspapers here.  If the article your son happened to have read is the interview with Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate, I have to say I think it is a worthwhile read. Even though it's a Russian paper, it was an American being interviewed, and after glancing at a couple of their other articles, it doesn't seem to be untruthful.

I'd be happy to hear that my sons were reading that!  Our DS29 tends to read from more sources than DS22.  When it comes to politics, it's our discussions at home that have the greatest impact on them, I'm sure.  It's too bad we Americans avoid the topic outside of our homes-it keeps too many of us too biased.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Fri, 08-24-2012 - 7:58pm
Ugh..., in my daughter's school (public middle school) they actually tell the kids to use Wikipedia as a source. Drives me crazy. I use Wikipedia a lot myself, but I am well aware that it may inaccurate. If I am just curious about the population of South Dakota or the date that Jesse Owens was born I don't think a little inaccuracy is a huge deal. I would never site Wikipedia in a report though.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Fri, 08-24-2012 - 8:09pm
Oh, don't get me wrong, I have no problem with him reading Russia Today I just want him to be aware of what he is reading and what the "slant" may be. I think it is always interesting to read foreign papers. It always provides a different perspective of the world. Even reading the Canadian Globe and Times gives me a little diferent perspective on world events. We are pretty liberal and I guess the apple doesn't fall far for the tree. Still I would like to see him read Krauthammer or George Will every once in a while.
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 08-29-2012 - 7:34pm

<<<There are more and more news sources now (and frankly less reliance on fact checking)>>>  I so totally agree.  It seems the news gospel "If your mother says she loves you, CHECK IT OUT" has gone the way of the dino.  And too much of the "news" is only blog repeats of ONE, often unsubstantiated, source.  And even trying to confirm data about things like STD's, or population, is frustratingly difficult.  Even places like the US Census, and the CDC, report data in 2 or 3 different places, and the numbers frankly don't agree.  And a lot of the statements made by BOTH political parties are infuriatingly skewed--even things you'd think were fairly straightforward.  They massage data on when the SUN came up in the morning!

I also have to say that most of the 20-somethings and up that I know, get their news from the 'net.  Some read newspapers on-line, but most just begin with Google or Yahoo news.  They RARELY watch the nightly news on TV, and they are listening to their music in the car. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Wed, 08-29-2012 - 8:46pm
They do watch TV and get "news" from Jon Stewart, LOL. Actually, I suspect Jon Stewart's show is probably more acturate than a lot of the stuff they find on the Internet. I find Stewart's interviews in particular extremely interesting and informative.