Housing for next year

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Housing for next year
12
Wed, 01-15-2014 - 3:44pm

Just curious since most of the ladies have been here much longer and kids farther along.  Did many of them stay in the dorms past Freshman year?  When Jordyn was home at christmas she said they were already beginning to make plans for roommates and apartments for next fall.  Her plan all along has been to live in the dorms freshman year and then move out into an apartment, most likely with roommates from her team.  That is still the plan, but I did remind her she was more than welcome and it may be a bit easier to be in the dorms for another year.  She said possibly, but even if she did, she'd want her car up on campus with her.  From my understanding parking on campus is expensive and a pain, hence easier time with it off campus in an apartment. 

Has others started talking about housing for next year already?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-23-2003
Wed, 02-05-2014 - 1:11pm

Ash, I went to one of those my first year of college.  Small midwest town and really not much offerings for off campus housing. It didn't seem like the upperclasmen felt confined or anything like that.  It was what it was.  I left because being from a big city, I felt so limited and claustrophobic.  When I transferred to a big state school, I lived in the dorms until my last year.  Most of the residents in this large apartment building were students.  It's a dorm now, LOL.

I visited my daughter this weekend while she started her first dose of meds.  We also looked around at apartments.  It seems to be a mix of small apartments complexes, condo rentals and rooms in houses rentals.  And many of the landlords do individual and/or short term leases.  She prefers sharing a house--she'll just have to find one that best suits her, preferably with the owner not living on the premises.  And we're not sure about her attending in the summer and getting the apartment or taking online classes from here at home.  She most definitely willl not be in the dorms again if she goes for summer session.  $$$$$$$$$ !!!!!!  She'll be checking on her school's off campus website and visiting the campus housing office for off campus stuff.  Her potential roommate situation is really shaky.  They're good friends, but the roommate's family and financial life is shaky, so that's why I'm insisting on individual leases.  I watch too many judge shows, LOL! 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Sat, 02-01-2014 - 2:48pm

At my D's LAC, almost all students live on campus in a residence hall their entire 4 years, except when they go abroad or to another university for a study program. This was one of the things that appealed to her. Some of the other schools she looked at, mostly the really large universities, just had housing for first years, and then students were on their own after that.

I can see the advantages of both. Living on campus really contributes to a strong sense of community, but it also contributes to the feeling of being in an ivory tower. Some kids want and need a more real-world experience early on, so an apartment is best for them.

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Wed, 01-22-2014 - 10:30am

Interesting to know mom_iteadrinker.  I have a friend who's daughter's first choice is McGill.  They are from Pennsylvania.

The dorm Jordyn currently lives in is being converted to only upperclassmen starting next year.  She is calling tonight to discuss options before priority applications are due on Friday.  Last year, none of the freshman on her team lived in dorms, this year, I believe all but 2 lived on campus, but one of them had an older sister on the team and they roomed together.  She did get out and look at apartments on Monday.  Because she is looking for a single or studio apartment the options are a little smaller, but she did find one she really liked right across from campus so our discussions tonight will be the expenses of both options and the pros and cons.  I have a hard time stomaching $16,500 for a single room plus meal plan for a year, but if that's the way she would rather go, then we'll do that.  I did find out in a conversation the other day that she's had a hard time making friends so far other than her teammates and roommate and its been harder than she expected.  She is finally beginning to make some friends in her latin classes.  So that was why she hadn't found a roommate, her current roommate offered a spot in their place next year, but the roommate is rooming with her high school boyfriend and several friends all from high school and Jordyn was not comfortable with that arrangement, so she's decided she'd rather do a single room next year and then go from there.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Tue, 01-21-2014 - 8:42pm

In this country, it is  rare for students to live in residence after their first year.  In fact, at DD's and DS's undergrad university (one of our top university), the only non-first years living in the residences were the "dons"-your RAs.  The residences were reserved for first years;  the university encouraged all first years to live in residence. 99% do.. However, that meant that there was not have enough places to accomendate upper years as well as all the  first years. Plus, the university wanted to keep the first years (who were mostly under the drinking age of 19) away from the upper years (who were of drinking age).

The university did have separate small residences for grad students (mostly for first year foreign students) .

It is considered a "right of passage" to move after your first year, part of  growing up.  The first year students  in January would start to look for places to live  in  the student ghetto.  (The ghetto is an area  of century-old homes, apartments buildings etc.. mostly rented by students surrounding the university.)  By March/April, the students would have signed leases (all had to sign, no parent signatures required) starting in May. They would move into their new digs from their residences after  exams and then leave for the summer

DD shared a house with 4 other girls and DS, with  4 boys. The kids all signed the lease; they each had their own room and all contributed furniture and kitchen stuff to furnish the rest of the  house.  It was a good education. Each student was responsible for paying their share of the rent, the ultities and internet on time.  They had to learn how to get along; keep the house clean etc.

The local universities and universities like McGill based residence places on marks. First years coming in  with above a certain average (your GPA)  are offered spots; everyone else has to find a place to live on their own. Again, those universities do not have enough residence spots to accomendate every student. 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-14-2000
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 10:36am

Jason lived in a dorm both years at WIU and then transferred to Northwestern where he lived in the dorm for 2 years. His final year there he moved off campus but the place he moved wasn't much more than a dorm room - it was an older home divided into 7 sleeping rooms with a common kitchen/living area. Just a block from where his dorm was so it wasn't exactly a 'real' apartment.

Pam
Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 10:17am

calmama54 wrote:
Hi Tracy - my daughter, who went to UO, moved off campus after freshman year. She also wanted her car and I believe living off campus turned out to be a lot cheaper with roommates. She lived in a complex very close to Valley River Center and it was probably the nicest apartment she's ever had. The Willamette River ran behind the complex and there was a great bike path that went for several miles, which she enjoyed for jogging (and me too, when I visited). Here's a link if you want to check it out, though I'm sure the price has gone up in the last 7 years: http://bouldersontheriver.com/

Thanks a ton for that info! (everyone also).  Calmama, I know she had one or two in mind she had mentioned but I don't remember the names.  i will definitely pass along this info to her to think about, that is a nice complex.  Heck, all but the 2 smallest apartments are bigger than our house at home!  I know she specifically didn't want certain ones near the stadium because of game day traffic and dealing with it.  I was surprised to learn that its not a matter of finding an apartment and dividing the rent by how many people there are, but that each person gets charged a set amount of rent.  My one concern was meals, she can cook well and everything, but with her practice schedules, I was more concerned that she'd get home at 9 at night after practice and be too tired to be cooking, or she has a packed schedule and only time to stop in somewhere on campus to grav something to eat, so at least a small meal plan would be beneficial for her for times she is in a lurch.  She's not in her dorm a ton, except on the weekends and she is mostly roommate free as her current teammate/roommate has a boyfriend and is mostly at his dorm across campus.  She does most of her studying right now at the student athlete center along with her tutoring hours, but as those become less, I don't know if she'll do more studying at "home" or still do it there because of the convience and also the fact that it is pretty controlled noise level wise. 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-23-2003
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 9:55am
DD is planning on moving off campus with a good friend in the Fall. I'm not too optimistic about the future of the friendship if they do, but that's another story. Aside from being affordable and safe, I'm insisting that 1.) she still apply for on-campus housing just in case, 2.) she get an place with individual leases and 3.) a place that's not miles from campus. She's currently in an on-campus apartment which has worked fine, especially since we don't have to pay for the meal plan, which even on the minimum number of meals was expensive. There's also the possibility that she may not be at her school in the Fall as she's exploring options for after the current semester.
Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 9:41am

It's the time of year that college students start figuring out where they're going to live, and they have to do it pretty much every year. 

At most of the private LACs and Ivys we visited, including the one senior DS goes to, students are given campus housing all 4 years.  Some larger universities with more limited housing, like Boston College, offer guaranteed housing for 4 years for certain groups, such as athletes and honor students.  My experience with larger public universities is that most students move off campus after their freshman or sophomore years.

Senior DS lived in a dorm for his first two years, then moved to a campus apartment with three senior girls for his junior year.  When they all graduated, he was kind of stuck; almost all his friends had graduated, but he did find a roommate who was returning from a year abroad.  They couldn't find a group they liked to share an apartment with on campus, so they moved off campus to a 2BR.  It actually works wonderfully for them because they like each other very well, and the town has two "seasons" - the academic season and the summer racing season - so their lease is only for the academic season.  Finding the roommate and the apartment was a good life lesson for him.

Freshman DD *can* have campus housing for all 4 years at her university but it is outrageously expensive, even for NYC - over $6500 per semester.  She is trying to find a roommate configuration for next year that won't leave her roommates in the lurch when she studies abroad next spring.  She's trying to find someone who is going abroad in the fall so they can swap out rooms, or maybe find 2 other girls who also plan to study abroad in the spring so the entire suite/apartment will be vacated.

Kelly

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2004
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 1:54am
DD24 lived at home the first 2 years of undergrad and in an apartment the last 2. We are only 25 min from her university, so it was a matter of choice that she moved into the apartment. At DD21's school, there are plenty of dorms and they are very nice. A lot of students stay in them all 4 years. She was in a dorm the first 2 years, an RA the 3rd and an RA the first 3 months of year 4. She ended up quitting for personal reasons and has just moved into her first apartment. Even though she is 21, I find myself worrying more than I did in the dorm. I felt like she was a little more protected on campus, but that is probably just the overprotective mom speaking. Her room mate is another former RA who quit around the same time Amanda did. They are not close friends, but should be great roommates based on all the training on roommate relations they had to go through for their job!
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Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
Thu, 01-16-2014 - 1:06am

The U that my ds attended had very limited on-campus housing available after freshman year, and his friends were moving off campus so that's what he wanted to do. There were a lot of apartment complexes that took students, the closer to campus the more they could charge. His group of guys started their search a little late, and there were some changes to the roommates over the summer, so overall it was a sub-optimal situation for ds but he learned a lot from the experience--everything from how to choose potential roommates and when to start looking to how to live in a group. He gladly got out of that apt after a year and lived in another apt for 2 years, and finally a house for his final (5th) year--same group of good friends for those last 3 years. 

The biggest downside to the off campus apartments is that they were 12 month leases, usually starting in September, so if the student planned to return home for the summer then s/he had to continue paying rent and utilities. If lucky they could find somebody attending summer school who wanted to sub-lease, but it usually wasn't for the entire summer, and sometimes they couldn't get the full rent amount because there was such a glut of rooms available. One sublettor ran the A/C 24/7 and ds had to pay a lot for utilities from that. And they were usually unfurnished which can have high set-up costs---but ds said that when the spring term ended the dumpsters around town were full of good furniture that leaving students had tossed out, so if your dd has a place to store things over the summer she might be able to furnish an apt for very cheap!

Overall, getting out of the dorms was better for my ds. The dorms were noisy and there was always somebody "up for a party" so it took a lot of willpower to focus on studying LOL. At the apt complexes the manager would show up if things got noisy; one complex had a rule about the number of visitors allowed. Ds cooking at home vs meal plan wasn't a problem, the meal plan was pretty expensive. Ds got into price comparison shopping and nutritional values when he had to cook for himself. He would cook a big batch of something like spaghetti and eat it for days. I felt like he was learning many more lessons in "real life" away from the dorms.

They started looking for housing for the next fall around this time of year; if they waited until after Spring Break (like he did first year) the less expensive places were already taken. Some places wanted a parent to co-sign but ds always found places that didn't have that requirement. The landlady for the house called me, and I told her that I gave him rent money every month and that he was a responsible boy. She was satisfied with that!

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