NorthCarolina is trying to reconcile their budget shortfalls. Will colleges be closed to save money?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-06-2009
NorthCarolina is trying to reconcile their budget shortfalls. Will colleges be closed to save money?
Tue, 11-09-2010 - 12:07pm

when a study of the entire state government structure is overdue, the universities can’t be overlooked. Considering the low graduation rates at some, legitimate questions about effectiveness can be raised. In fact, Erskine Bowles also suggests that budget cuts might be tied to poor academic achievement: Graduate more students, get more money; let more students drop out, lose funding. It’s a survival-of-the-fittest approach to higher education.

Yet, there’s more to a university’s value than a four-year graduation rate. Every campus accounts for a huge economic impact. Furthermore, tough times make it harder for students — especially those from economically challenged backgrounds — to stay in school. Cutting faculty and course offerings likely will slow students’ academic progress even more. Still, the state can hardly afford to continue high subsidies for poor results. Universities must find ways to improve retention and graduation rates.

North Carolina U's were told to prepare for 54 million in budget cuts for the upcoming fiscal year to meet the anticipated budget shortfall of more than $3 billion.

What about your state university systems?

I read where , the University of California at Berkeley will join the 50K club as the first public university to charge over $50,000 in tuition.

Any moves coming up to force the schools to consider dramatically raising tuition to private-school levels or reducing services offered?

How many online classes will be used to replace the brick and mortar experience?

Does your state have in place maximum tuition cap increases? NorthCarolina is at 6.5 Florida already stopped ours.