to really learn, quit studying and take a test??

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-06-2009
to really learn, quit studying and take a test??
14
Sat, 02-05-2011 - 11:01am

There is a study where findings reveal students learned better and retained what they learned to a higher degree when they tested their knowledge on subjects versus reading and studying notes.

Do you think this may be a reflection of our brains being on a different alert when taking tests?

Did you find you learned something better when you had to teach what you knew to someone else?

Is there a question you got right or missed on a quiz/test that you still remember the aha moment of learning the answer?

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Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Sat, 02-05-2011 - 12:13pm

Did you find you learned something better when you had to teach what you knew to someone else? Absolutely.

Avatar for suzyk2118
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Registered: 07-30-1997
Sat, 02-05-2011 - 2:57pm
If this is true, ds18 is in trouble. He has never tested well; he's a 'divergent thinker' and can come up with justifications for almost all responses on multiple choice tests which never proved out what he knew at all. For example in 5th grade they had a science test where it said, 'The (blank) and the (blank) are at the center of the atom' - he hyperfocused on the word 'center' and figured it couldn't be protons and neutrons because they were all over the place. So, being the kid of a physicist and mathematician, he says 'quark' and 'gluon' and got it wrong. It wasn't wrong but they sure hadn't covered that in class. That is the type of thinker he is thus just giving seat tests definitely doesn't display his capabilities. Now if he'd been questioned orally and been able to voice his confusion...

Yes, I definitely learned better when I'd try to explain something to someone else.

No particular test question of mine stands out - but the above one for ds definitely was an aha moment for me as far as what divergent thinking does!

Sue

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-14-1999
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 9:46am

I know with my DS this was true- he liked working in study groups better. He retained information much better that way- he was never one that studied or read his books/ notes for hours, he would just go over the basics the night before a test and always did well

Kathy
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-06-2009
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 11:03am

I brought this study up to some of my friends last night ... We wondered if there are different parts of the brain used for reading comprehension

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 1:44pm

I am slightly confused with that statistics you quoted? Does that include your colleges?

Avatar for sabrtooth
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Registered: 12-03-1999
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 3:09pm

In the US, a "college" offers only undergraduate degrees-i.e. certificates, associate and bachelor degrees. A "university" offers BOTH undergraduate and graduate degrees.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Sun, 02-06-2011 - 6:00pm

Here, degrees are only bachelor's or higher. "Colleges" cannot grant degrees. Only universities can. Not every university here offers post-graduate degrees. Some, such as Acadia, is only undergrad.

Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Mon, 02-07-2011 - 1:03am

In theory, I agree with you.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-23-2006
Mon, 02-07-2011 - 8:12am

Visit My Blog Reflections&Inspirations by Pam

"When you stop chasing the wrong things, you give the right things a chance to catch you."

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
Mon, 02-07-2011 - 2:17pm

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