tell one fact

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-06-2009
tell one fact
62
Sun, 08-07-2011 - 9:23am
The POCS board is a lot like the CHEERS show, where most everyone knows your name.


tell one fact about yourself to promote this knowledge. I will start~ add more as you like but ONLY one at a time;



I

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 5:48pm
I am glad to hear that Montreal is doing better. I guess I really don't know the history of the town from the French-Canadien perspective. My BIL just made a couple of comments in the 30+ years I have known him and the bilk of my info was from my husbands English speaking Uncle from Montreal. Still my personal experience in Quebec was mixed. When we were in Quebec City an extremely angry man started yelling at us in French when we were attempting to get information from a Park Ranger at an historic site. The ranger had asked us if we wanted to talk to her in English or French and when we said English he just went wild. She wasn't even talking to him. The ranger argued with him for several minutes and we just pretty much ignored him. Still Quebec City is a tourist town that makes a lot of money from US tourist so I think it is a little nutty to treat tourists like that. However I am not a Canadien citizen so I have no right to comment. I just need to vote with my feet and not go back if I don't like the way that I was treated. The truth is though that it didn't really bother me enough to make me stop going there. And you are correct - Montreal bagels are the best in the world.

Avatar for elc11
Community Leader
Registered: 06-16-1998
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 7:00pm

What makes the bagels from Montreal the best? Do they truly taste better or have a better texture than any you have found elsewhere in Canada, or in NYC (where they probably think they have the best bagels lol), or Chicago, etc? Or are you just showing home-town pride?

IMO the best bagels in San Diego are from a little bagel shop run by a Vietnamese family. But I'm not enough of a bagel connoisseur to state that they are the best in the world

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-16-1999
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 7:06pm

I find this whole French/English discussion interesting in light of what is happening in some areas of the US, where the majority of people are English speakers but where a lot of businesses seem to only want to address their clientelle in Spanish.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 8:16pm
I almost wrote about the situation in the US and the push for immigrants to speak English. Personally it doesn't bother me when immigrants speak a different language. I am very skeptical of the claim that previous immigrants all learned English quickly. I remember a lot of my friends had parents or Grandparents who only spoke Greek or Korean or Cantonese or Italian etc.. None of the children were unable to speak English. Even in my dad's day, when immigrants lived in neighborhoods where everyone spoke their home language and they could function just fine without speaking English, the children always learned English. I really think we are worrying unnecessarily.

As for Quebec, they have a little bit of a different situation. They are trying to preserve a language that may otherwise be overrun by English. I understand their concern, I just think that it is a little over the top to demand that goods that come from Israel or China or Poland or wherever and are really intended for use by people who speak those languages, be labeled in French as well. Of course for me half the fun of going to H-Mart is trying to figure out what I am buying, LOL.

Robin
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 8:18pm

There is a lingering dislike of Americans and all Anglophones in Quebec City.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 8:38pm

The bagels from Montreal are kosher. They have a taste of brown sugar, not "yeasty" at all. They are very dense, small and very "chewy". They are great toasted, with cream cheese and lox. I would expect the kosher bagels from New York would be similar. Whenever someone at work goes to Montreal, they come back with "bagel orders".

Another "delectable" is St-Laurant Steamies.. Those are steam hot-dogs in a steamed bun with chopped lettice on top-nothing else.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 8:51pm
You are correct I was at the Plains of Abraham and I did understand the significance of the location. But what I don't understand is why someone would be mad at me if I respectfully want to understand and teach my children about their history. It isn't like I personally invaded Quebec. At the time of that invasion I believe that my great great great grandparents were probably enjoying the lovely treatment of the Cossacks in southern Russia..but I digress. I did not expect everyone to speak English when I went to Quebec ( but the truth is that everyone we encountered did.) But in any case, as I said it is not my place to tell the people of quebec what to do.

I did have one other question. We went to see the fireworks show. Before the show they played the national anthem and asked all to rise. We noticed that several people did not rise. Was that a protest?

Robin

I do have
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 9:01pm
Actually the bagels in New York are quite different. They are bigger and less sweet. I really don't think the kosher part has much to do with it. Most bagels are kosher, but a lot of the kosher ones really stink.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 9:07pm

The difference is not only are the majority of people in Quebec French but it is the only official language in the province. All businesses, the provincial government, the courts etc.. are in French. There are essential no English Schools, since most of those are full French Immersion Schools. And only kids whose parents went to English Schools in Quebec can send their kids there. Everyone else, even people from other provinces and the US, have to send their kids to French Schools. Even the "English universities" like McGill have to have courses in French. They are essentially bilingual.

Manitoba & New Brunswich are officially bilingual. Everything is in both language. Ontario is essential bilingual

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2009
In reply to: elle_fl
Thu, 08-11-2011 - 9:17pm

Actually, In Canada, we have strict label requirements. Everything has to be in both English & French, all across the country.

Plus, we have strict requirements as to list of ingredients etc.. on labels. The product is "vetted" before it gets on the shelves. t doesn't matter where the product comes from. For example, you will see many times 3 languages on labels.

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