foriegn language and speech issues

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
foriegn language and speech issues
5
Thu, 09-19-2013 - 12:34pm

So DS is currently not getting speech through his IEP. It was dropped a few years back. He had a cleft which causes issues with speech but he tested almost normal range and was getting so many other services we agreed to drop it and would pick it up privately if there was an issue. About a year and half later we started his orthodontic and having speech issues but not much we can do he has a lot of metal in his mouth. He had a nasal speech issues which was mostly fixed with surgery but its not perfect. 1000 times better but sometimes he can be hard to understand. So he comes home first week of school excited they are learning Spanish this year and imediately mommy radar pops up. Will his announciation cause issues?? Anyone have kids with speech issues have problems with foreign language?? He is excited about taking it so I would hate for it to become an issue for him.

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sat, 09-21-2013 - 8:50am

If it becomes a problem maybe it will prompt speech services again. A speech/language therapist would be the best one to ask about that. That's great he is taking spanish, what grade is he in again? My DD has a year of foreign language under her belt but we've cut it off b/c it got so complicated and cloudy for her, she's only a 9th grader and we may visit it again before she finishes hs. Her plate is pretty full in the other subjects for now.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Mon, 09-23-2013 - 12:30pm

He is in the 5th grade now. Given his school is 30% white, 30% asian and the remaining a hodgpodge, kind of surprised its Spanish not Chinese but guess thats more complicated to learn plus so many dilacs. My dad's town teaches Italian to elementry school kids because they got a grant seeing as its a highly Italian area. When I was a kid we had a choice in Jr high between Spanish, French and Italian but I guess its all Spanish these days, which is good to learn. I choose French not that I retained ANY of it but at work  knowing Spanish would be helpful.

Will definatelty see how it goes. IEP meeting wont be until December so will have an idea how Spanish is working for him...

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 09-24-2013 - 5:27am
I'm jealous there's a district out there that teaches Italian. DD1 (not on an IEP) would looove to take Italian, She's already got her foreign language credits for high school and has been pretty bored with French. I am full Italian on both sides, my dad speaks it fluently but we never learned it, I only know bits and pieces.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Tue, 09-24-2013 - 6:41am

Where I grew up you where either irish or italian so sometime after I finished school they got this grant. Now my sisters kids are in that district but they never got italian even though it is offered in their schools and since she is a hands off parent guessing maybe its something you need to request? Neice had the option in Jr high and she picked spanish. We aren't italian so it makes sense she would use that less. They don't offer French until high school. My kids will only have Spanish until high school then they can choose Italian or French or Latin. Our community schools program offers Chinese which I have been tempted to sign us up but I never did good in foriegn language

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Sat, 10-19-2013 - 6:01pm

I am originally from Providence, RI and given that they have a big Italian population, that was offered in high school.  I took 3 years & went on to major in Italian in college--I forgot so much now that I haven't practiced, but I could probably read a magazine in Italian & know what they were saying.  In our school district, in middle school they have a little each of Latin, Spanish & French which seems very confusing to me, then they pick one for high school.  Since I work with a lot of Chinese people, I can say that Chinese would be a lot harder to learn, even if you didn't have to learn to write the characters.