General education teacher provides special education?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
General education teacher provides special education?
5
Wed, 06-19-2013 - 11:51pm

I have a question about this, and need to see if anyone knows more about the law concerning this than I do.  

As I posted before, my son qualifies for services for written expression disorder.   We do our primary schooling through an ALE school (think Charter School) in the district.    I am his primary teacher, but he does get some onsite classes as well.    The district wants him to do the Read 180 at the regular school.   He also qualifies for speech therapy.   He is 5th grade, writing at a 2nd grade level and reading at 11th grade level.   I don't feel that remedial reading, what Read 180 is, is the answer.

The principal at our school emailed some people with my concerns.  And came back and told me that he would be in general education for Language Arts, with accommidations.   2 hours a day.    Which is better than being in a remedial reading program, but....the ALE has a program called Excellence in Writing.   And it is going to be offered at my son's grade level next year.   But the principal checked, and the district said that he can't take the class in place of the services that they are offering because it is not taught by a special education teacher.   But neither, apparently, is the new class they want to put him in.  

So, I am fine doing what I have been doing with him - he is making progress.   I would be happy to not have him in any writing program at the school (not even sure that with accommodations the one at the ALE would be appropriate anyhow - I need to look at the curriculum.)   But the kicker is, I have been told, in WA you MUST accept the whole offered IEP plan or move to a part time student status.   Which means I would not get as big of a learning plan budget for him, and the portortion taken by the district for speech therapy would be larger (a double whammy.)  

I would like to argue that what they initially offered was not appropriate.   I would also like to argue that it is not services if it a general education teacher is teaching.   My understanding is that accommodations can and need to be done by ALL general education teachers.   I would like for them to admit that they have no appropriate services and just let me do the accommodations (as I already do.)  Then he could get his full budget and still get speech therapy.  

I know I am probably the only person on this board in this strange situation.   I guess I need to know for sure if services can be done by a non-special education teacher, legally.   Anyone have any idea?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003

Is it his grammar or handwritting thats behind? Seems remedial reading would bore a kid reading above his grade level. To me at least.

DS is going into 5th grade and his reading and writting is behind but for him its mostly the handwritting and he has motor skills delays and been getting OT and PT since kindergarten. He also gets reading help and is in a social skills group and he has both a general ed and special ed teacher in the class (its dual taught). This is the first year we had dual taught and I am VERY pleased with the results.

So if I read this right if you reject the reading they can say no ed plan? If thats the case then fine let them give remedial reading to a kid ABOVE reading level. My guess is he will meet the goal and then maybe they will see it didn't affect the writiing. Sometimes we just need to go with the flow to prove a point. taking EVERYTHING in me NOT to go see his 3rd grade teacher with his report card at end of the year and say SEE this is what happens when an IEP is followed!! Midway through year I got tired of banging my head trying to get through to her. If it wasn't for other parents with similar issues I would have believed her my kid was just stupid and lazy...

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004

He just graduated out of OT.   The issues have been fine motor skills, needing vision therapy, and at this point, I think just organizing his thoughts and getting them down.   He couldn't see properly until 2 years ago.   The schools only offer of help at that time was OT.   NOW they want to offer all this extra, which rather confuses me.   Right now it appears that the issue is getting the thoughts down on paper.   He is slow with his writing - his thoughts go a lot faster than his brain, and he isn't sure where to start.  I am working with him on frameworks to help him outline what he is doing and he is making progress.   With the IEP I mostly wanted accommodations for testing and other classes - that teachers make copies of notes or require less writing or other forms of showing his knowledge.  

 

Yes, I think he would be bored, and his a sensitive kid - he would move around, do kid things that kids do when the brain is not occupied, and then get in trouble for what he couldn't help.   (He has ADHD too - which I can deal with at home without medication.   To get medication now I would have to have him retested, which means November at soonest knowing the doctor and his schedule.)   He IS making progress with his writing with the specialized program that I am doing with him (designed by a special ed teacher for kids with writing issues.)   He is just not up to grade level and thus they want to put him in this program.   Which I am not sure is actually better than the program that I am doing with him.  

And this excuse that he can't do the class at the ALE because it is not a special ed teacher...leads me to wonder how a general ed teacher at the regular school is different.  Or how they are both different than me.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010

Yes a regular ed teacher can provide services if they are supervised by a sped teacher.  At least, that's the way we write our IEPs in our state--same as if the teacher assistant is providing the services.  So you could ask if that's the deal and how often the regular ed teacher is being supervised (once a week, every day etc).  I think you would have an argument on the what's offered is not appropriate though.  I don't really understand the part about having to accept the whole IEP thing, since the IEP is supposed to be written by the whole team, of which you would be a member.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

What kind of accomodations was he getting before and why can't it continue at the charter school? I'm probably just not reading this right but if he's not getting accomodations anyway in language arts I believe he could get gen ed instruction there. To the general question, can a gen ed teacher teach special education.. Ask your state if there are guidelines about that and take that up with your school, My knee jerk answer is yes, my 8th grader in on an IEP and every one of her teachers has a copy of it, She is placed according to her skills but not all of her teachers are special ed teachers. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2004
An update here. So, to answer at least one question, as the charter school, which is part of the school district, does not have any special ed people, they have to refer to the local school. So, basically I worked it out with the special ed person who does writing that she meets with my son for 30 minutes twice a month, and I get to sit in. She discusses what he has written, then he gets homework, that I work with him on at home in the ways that she has told me to do it. So basically, I get to be the general ed teacher being supervised by her. So far I think this is working well for us. The special ed teacher agreed with me that the 3 hours a day in remedial reading/writing/grammar was not what he needed. He scored at a 11th grade reading level (he is 6th) and get perfect grades in his grade level grammar.