The news in my school district...

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Registered: 10-23-2001
The news in my school district...
7
Wed, 12-14-2011 - 11:31am

..is they're considering if not already planning for mainstream of ALL special education.

 

 

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Registered: 02-24-2010
Wed, 12-14-2011 - 2:28pm

It's usually called inclusion, when the sped services are given in the classroom.

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Registered: 02-07-2011
Wed, 12-14-2011 - 2:56pm
I don't think it sounds like a good idea either. If the child is severe, they really should be in a smaller classroom. I don't see how it helps the child that is non-verbal, for example. They won't be able to keep up on lessons at all, and can only think they would be a distraction to the other students. I think that it's fantastic when they can include special ed students in the classroom, but some need much more assistance and should be provided that in a safe environment. I really wonder how some of these kids will be able to handle the commotion of a large classroom, I can't help but think it would be too much for them.

I can't see how the district would save any money by doing this, if that is their motive. The teacher wouldn't have the time to devote to the student, and some probably require an aide of their own.

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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 12-16-2011 - 8:02am

I don't either and I don't know if this is a move happening in more places than just our schools.

 

 

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Registered: 10-08-2004
Sat, 12-17-2011 - 4:28pm
I think it is a bad idea for severe ld children for the reason u stated I also think my son needed that one on one for his reading for years. I hope this does not go through. I am scared for middle school next yr. because that will b all inclusion.

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Registered: 05-02-2004
Mon, 12-19-2011 - 1:20am
How is it an "Individualized Education Plan" if all the students get the same thing? When I moved to here, when I told the speech therapist that my son was getting an hour of therapy a week and she said "no one gets more than a half hour a week here" I had the same thoughts. (Yes, I know the focus is different, but really, some kids need more intervention than others!)

How do the classroom teachers feel about this? It is going to make their jobs harder and they don't have the training and the "tricks" that the trained people are supposed to have to keep order.

My son probably should have been in a special day class had he gone to school. Vision problems were causing him to appear inattentive and ADHD. Drugs would not have cured it. He would have been disruptive in a regular class to the rest of the students because for him to see straight he had to move. Having everything else move while he sat still was probably akin to torture to him. He needed an environment where he would be allowed to move more than the average kid. Unfortunately, the school wanted to put him with the really strict teacher who makes kids cry when they can't sit still for half an hour or more in Kinder. Which, in a nutshell, is why we home school.

Things are much better for him now, but I know a major concern was how my child would impact (unintentionally and with all sorts of kindness and concern on his part) other kids who were more traditional learners. This putting the square pegs in the round holes doesn't seem to be a good idea.

I suggest that you find out who the local teacher's union is and call them with your concerns. The union may be better able to combine with the parents and teachers to keep some classrooms for at least the most needy kids.
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 12-22-2011 - 11:21am

Thank you, and I like your idea about talking to the teacher union but I'm not going to do that just yet until I know more and get moer information, while the director of special services did inform us of this at the last CSE meeting she didn't not provide specific details of the change, etc.

 

 

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Registered: 05-02-2004
Tue, 12-27-2011 - 11:51am
My son is 9 now, 10 in May. Even though we are schooling with an ALE (kind of a homeschooling charter school) it is still difficult at times to get him what he needs. But, I know that I know my son best, and my instincts have been right on for what limitations he has and what he needs. I actually have more time to research , and have found him materials that had the OT going "WOW! I have seen parts, but not the whole thing...."

About surrounding yourself with people who want to help, we now have that at the ALE. All the teachers there (we go in for classes once a week) have homeschooled or are homeschooling, or plan to homeschool their kids. I actually, for the first time ever, had the principal sit in on an IEP meeting - and he totally backed me up when the administrative person said (in a snide voice) "well, we only allow scribes or technology support for state testing when the child has to have a scribe in the classroom!" I did tell her I was his scribe at home, and furthermore, the teacher of one of his classes asked if she could have a parent be a scribe for him! The principal agreed too - a very satisfying moment for me!

But the last system we were at did not listen, the principal wanted him doing kinder with the one teacher in the school who did not get special ed kids and whom with my daughter 8 boys transfered out the first second they could, because the teacher couldn't stand kids who: couldn't sit still, couldn't pay attention, who had speech issues, who hugged, who were different. My daughter had her, and I knew from experience, while that woman was not ideal for my daughter, it would have been a disaster for my son.

That meeting you described sounded like an organization where we used to live called SPIN. It was very helpful when I was first getting started with the IEP road. Unfortunately, I have not found a similar organization here, but then I have a more supportive (overall) school here too.

I have to wonder, if they are going to have ALL the kids mainstreamed, what are they going to do with the most severe kids? My grandmother worked as an aid, and really loved, a classroom severely delayed kids. Yes, they were supposed teach them math and to read, but most of the kids (teens) were still in diapers and couldn't recognize letters, let alone their names. Every district has kids like this, and yes, need school to reach their highest potential too. But these are also the kids that NCLB can never teach to read on grade level, (and why all schools should eventually fail to reach that 100%) and I am unsure that most teachers outside of music, would have a clue about what to do with these kids unless they are just sitting and listening to the lesson. Yes, good for other kids to interact with them, read to them, but all kids have needs. I just worry that by mainstreaming everyone that teachers will have less time to work with the rest of the class too.