Does ADA go too far?

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2008
Does ADA go too far?
3
Tue, 09-28-2010 - 3:03pm

I think I've only commented in here once, but I read here when there's something new.



I hope I did the link right, I was wondering if anyone else, particularly parents of Down Syndrome kids, find this story disturbing?



http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/High-school-player-Down-syndrome-scores-51-yard-touchdown-Ike-Ditzenberger?gt1=39002



I used to volunteer with some kids years back and have several friends with now graduated D.Syn kids. Reading the "quotes" from "mom" has really set off some of the families I know. College Ball? His dream? REALLY? If his team and the opposing team "allow" him to make a TD, is it really fair to break his heart this way? What REAL College team is going to "allow" this to continue for him? The parents I know feel they are setting this young man up for a world of hurt in his future and can't believe any school district would allow the "equality" thing to go this far. There's also questions of, "Does this young man know they are "letting" him score or is he led to believe he can truly keep up with the team?"" Will this story be heard on the radio and will he understand it?" "Can he read and comprehend this story in the news?"



I know there's some truly militant parent's with special needs kids that feel this is just fine. But then, unless this young man is an exceptional athlete at the High School level- what about the skinny computer nerd that dreams of football, or the short clumsy one? THOSE parents also have some words about the special effort for this one kid, as in why him?



Maybe most haven't heard about this, but I live in another part of Washington State and theres a whole lot of grumbling going on - quietly so far. I was just wondering how others felt about it?

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Thu, 10-14-2010 - 12:43pm

I don't find the part about the team letting him score when they were clearly going to win anyway that bad.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-21-2008
Tue, 10-12-2010 - 4:24pm

Thanks, pretty much what I'm hearing from most parents around here. The DS kids, now adult that I still see sometimes, are all working in a sheltered workshop locally. They aren't dim by any means, fully able to articulate their disappointment that now that they no longer qualify for the public school programs it seems like they have few "normal" (their words, not mine!) friends anymore. If I question NORMAL the one girl will elbow her (also DS) friend and say " but WE'RE different, WE'RE special" and they giggle like lunatics- a sarcastic inside joke. Their biggest social problem is having a hard time believing that not everybody means well.

Anyway, thanks for the response, this really disturbed me.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 10-08-2010 - 8:53pm

I find this very patronizing (I have a nephew with Down syndrome and another with autism). All children, whether they have special needs or not, need to live in the real world. I don't like "trophies for every kid on the team" policies either. Life is unequal and unfair, and the best way to cope is to learn to rise above the unfairness, not to have everything tweaked so you don't suffer. That's not giving kids with DS enough credit.