HPV vaccine?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
HPV vaccine?
10
Tue, 07-10-2012 - 8:20am
My daughter turns 13 in a couple of weeks and I will be taking her to the doctor right after that. I know the doctor is going to want her to get the HPV shot and I have heard that it is an extremely painful shot. She is really terrible about shots and I dread getting her this 3 series of shots. I assume that you guys have already been through this with your high school kids and I am wondering if the HPV shot really is a lot worse than other shots. I have seen reports that 1 or 2 shots in the series may be enough and I am thinking of waiting another year to see if the CDC changes the recommendation to 1 or 2 shots instead. I am really dreading this because my daughter is SO bad about shots. Any advice or support would be appreciated. Robin
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-28-2012
Re: HPV vaccine?
Tue, 09-11-2012 - 8:00pm
I have not and probably will not get this for my daughter. She developed a vocal tic after a meningitis vaccinations a few years back, so I stick to the basics!
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 1:10pm
Like you I am really trying to decide if the benifits outweigh the risks. When the disease is easily transferred from one person to another I think it is a little more difficult because the good of society as a whole must be included in the equation, but with the HPV vaccine it is easier to think of risk/benefit in personal terms.
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 4:00pm

Here are the risks...

According to a study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases 33% of women become infected with HPV within one year of starting their first sexual relationship, and 50% of the women were infected with HPV three years later, despite the fact they'd still only had a single sexual partner.  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/94113.php  

BOTH my daughters contracted HPV while in monogamous, long-term relationships.  Despite being assured that pregnancy and manual deliveries were possible after HPV TREATMENT, it took my daughter 5 years & 1 miscarriage to become pregnant.  The cervical scarring caused by the TREATMENTS for this disease caused her to suffer a 36 hour labor with her 1st -and probably ONLY- child, due to failure of the cervix to dilate.  After the scarring TORE & she went into end-stage labor, she lost 10-15% of her blood volume.  After they got the baby out, the OB had to MANUALLY apply pressure to the cervix for at least 15 minutes, to get the bleeding to stop.  The result of all this were infections that had her AND the baby on antibiotics for 10 days, and caused a skin disorder --dermatographia-- which still has not subsided, 8 MONTHS later.  My older daughter says that IF and when she becomes pregnant, she will opt for a C-Section, trading one risk for another. 

Each year in the U.S., there are about:

  • 12,000 women who get cervical cancer in the U.S. Almost all of these cancers are HPV-associated.
  • 1,500 women who get HPV-associated vulvar cancer
  • 500 women who get HPV-associated vaginal cancer
  • 400 men who get HPV-associated penile cancer
  • 2,700 women and 1,500 men who get HPV-associated anal cancer
  • 1,500 women and 5,600 men who get HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancers (cancers of the back of throat including base of tongue and tonsils)

Approximately 20 million Americans are currently infected with HPV. Another 6 million people become newly infected each year.   HPV is so common that at least 50% of sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives.

You might also want to read the rest of the CDC fact sheet on HPV.  http://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv.htm

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 5:11pm
Thank you for the info. My GYN said that the one big advantage of the vaccine for women who routinely receive GYN exams was to avoid cervical scarring like you described. I really appreciate your first hand account of what could happen. I shouldn't have said that I am against the vaccine. That is certainly not true. I am just trying to figure out the timing of receiving it. If it only lasts 5 years before you need a booster is 13 the right time to get it? I know I am probably naive, but I was really old before I had my first sexual experience and I kind of see the world that way. I don't necessarily think my daughter will be as old as I was, but 13 seems really young. Like I said, I am probably naive, but I sure hope not. I am thinking 14 or 15 may be a better age and then maybe they will have tweaked the vaccine to last longer.
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 7:06pm

Here are the reasons doctors suggest the HPV vaccine by age 13...

Young people aged 13–24 made up about 17% of all people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in the United States in 2008.  That number is higher now, in 2012.

HPV infections account for about half of STIs diagnosed among 15–24-year-olds each year.  That's DIAGNOSED.  Most cases are contracted at LEAST a year before they are diagnosed.  How many 13yo's do you know who have Pap tests, or gyne exams, when these diseases are DIAGNOSED?

27% of sexually active teens have had sex by age 15.  13% of ALL teens have had sex by age 15.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-19-2006
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 7:27pm
Actually it is a moot point right now because after the doctor examined her in July she said to wait a year. I did not ask her if it was okay to wait a year she just told us to. She said she wanted to wait until after dd's period started. I am hopeful that by then they have decided that 2 shots in the series are plenty and I am also hoping that my daughter gets over her fear of needles. Maybe I will make her dad take her, LOL. In any case I sure hope that they discover that it lasts longer than 5 years or I may consider waitingAA little longer. I realize that lots of kids are sexually active, but seriously, my whole family is a bunch of socially awkward nerds. Okay, we'll actually my dd somehow escaped the socially awkward part, but she still isn't particularly advanced in her social skills. She is just a super happy kid which further supports the doctors theory that she is not going through puberty yet. Maybe I should take her in for the shot when she starts to drive me crazy.
Avatar for sabrtooth
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-03-1999
Wed, 09-12-2012 - 10:17pm

Every kid is different, you know your child, and your doctor knows her patient.  I just quoted the stats that are behind the CDC recommendations.  The sad thing is, I know a few pregnant 13yo's, and believe me, they are NOT all in the inner city. 

Community Leader
Registered: 12-16-2003
Fri, 09-14-2012 - 6:09pm
I never took my dd, now 18. I am wary that such things really do all that they say and without side effects. I figure if she wants it now, she can go and get it.

Ramona  Mom to 2 great kids and wife to one wonderful hubby since 1990!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-16-2012
Mon, 09-17-2012 - 11:40am
tooner2006 wrote:
Actually it is a moot point right now because after the doctor examined her in July she said to wait a year. I did not ask her if it was okay to wait a year she just told us to. She said she wanted to wait until after dd's period started. I am hopeful that by then they have decided that 2 shots in the series are plenty and I am also hoping that my daughter gets over her fear of needles. Maybe I will make her dad take her, LOL.


Our doctor told us the same thing- to wait until DD started her period...I wonder what the reasoning is for that.

I like your idea of having her dad take her- I may very well make my DH do that!