Other schooling options for grades 11 and 12?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Other schooling options for grades 11 and 12?
32
Mon, 05-09-2011 - 9:52pm

I can't believe I have to think about this, but my 10th grade daughter hates school. She has gone from being interested, engaged and curious to being completed burned out, ground down and absolutely sick of it. She hates all the testing, the busy work, the pressure to live up to what is expected of her. Yes, she is in therapy, no, she's not on drugs (but on meds for depression),

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2001
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 10:33am

FWIW, I think sabrtooth is one of the most clueless posters.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 11:04am

I graduated from BC--I had a double major in Romance Languages & Sociology--actually I never found college that hard.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 12:53pm

Thank you thank you thank you! Yes, this is exactly what she's experiencing. And I do know Sabrtooth is cynical, but she occasionally has good advice. I was just surprised that she went on the attack in response to a question about schooling options.

Our school isn't very flexible, unfortunately. For example, she was placed in AP Lit next year. DD loves English and is currently attending a writers' conference, so it's one of her favorite subjects. But she looked at the curriculum for AP Lit and then compared it with a couple of honors English classes. She decided the theme of one of the other classes would be more interesting to her. She asked her advisor about switching and the advisor, who really puts all smart kids in the "may get into Harvard and make the school look good, so must not deviate from plan" box, told her that this would be very foolish and that colleges would frown on it.

Really? What if my kid wants to go to a quirky liberal arts college? Are they really going to say, "My word, this kid turned down a chance to take a class that would make her look good in favor of one that she was interested in, we can't possibly accept her!"

I'm not condemning the school for this attitude. It's heavily entrenched and hard to change, and there is a lot of parental pressure on the teachers and counselors to get

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 1:11pm

I went to a Seven Sisters college and had a similar experience to yours. I majored in medieval history *G* and did take more science than I needed because I liked it, but I know those who actually majored in a science or math worked harder than I did. I actually ended up getting a MS in journalism and working as a science writer.

And you're right about MCAS and more recent pressures. Every expert I've spoken to about

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 2:10pm

I haven't read the other responses yet so forgive if I repeat but have you checked into a middle college program? Several of our districts offer this. It's for 11th and 12th graders only. It allows selected kids the chance to take their courses at a community college and get both highschool and college credit. It's also great in that these are actual college credits that aren't

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-01-2001
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 3:05pm

We have chosen to avoid the guidance counselor and just do our own planning.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 7:51pm

Thank you. This is a great idea. I am going to look into this with her

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 8:14pm

I'm not at all offended by your question. Our school is very WASP-y.

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-28-1999
Thu, 05-12-2011 - 11:40pm

That's the most ridiculous guidance advice I've ever heard--would it be better to be in the class she is interested in and probably get an A or the class she's not interested in and pushed into?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-06-1999
Fri, 05-13-2011 - 6:15pm

Just a few thoughts.