The waiting is over!

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
The waiting is over!
35
Fri, 03-29-2013 - 5:07pm

This was college admissions letters week, and am I ever glad it is over! 

The final count:  accepted at both safety schools, rejected from both Ivy League schools, waitlisted at one stretch, admitted to one stretch, and admitted to all four "fit" schools.  She got a full scholarship to one safety, a surprise merit scholarship to one "fit," and admission to the honors program and guaranteed housing for 4 years at another "fit."  Her #1 choice was the LAST to notify her, so it's been a nail-biter of a week!  She'll be going to New York University in the fall.

Ash and anyone else waiting to hear - how are your kids feeling now?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-1999
Tue, 04-02-2013 - 11:39am

How exciting for your son!  That's fantastic! 

Yes, exactly, the downside to these wonderful LACs is that they feel very small by the end of the four years.  There are ways to deal with that but it's important to be conscious of their limitations going in.  Many kids go abroad.  At BMC, those who are involved in "bi-co" activities spend a lot of their time at different campuses.  I think the newspaper is jointly run between Haverford and Bryn Mawr and orchestra and religious activities are as well.  My dd has worked in Philadelphia and takes classes at Haverford and she still talks about the small size of the school and the sense that everyone knows everyone else's business.

As for life after college, my dd has a job offer in hand.  She really isn't sure what she wants to do at this point and has worked to date in nonprofits.  She thinks she'd like to have some experience working in business before making a final decision where to pursue graduate work or whether to pursue nonprofit work.   I've been impressed here too that she's been able to go to her favorite professors for guidance both on specific job advice and for more general ideas on a future path.

I'm also kind of tickled that both older girls have been really resourceful in directing my high school-aged girl to explore different pursuits.   Oldest dd works for a national blog so her skills tend to lie in searching out not so obvious offerings and she sends these to dd's inbox.  Middle dd's skills reflect 4 years of working closely with professors: she comes up with ways to network and directs youngest dd to people in the community who can support her plans.  Neither one of them was so on top of things when they were still in high school!

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-1999
Tue, 04-02-2013 - 11:53am

I think she will like all her schools and the hardest part will be making the choice.   All three are beautiful schools in beautiful settings and all three will offer great peers and a personalized feel.  If she hasn't already sat in on classes, she should do so and she should choose classes that are of specific interest to her, not just what's offered on the list she gets on the admitted students' day.   If she can contact professors in advance to ask about sitting in on a smaller class, like a creative writing seminar, that would be ideal.

Avatar for melissamc
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Registered: 03-22-2007
Tue, 04-02-2013 - 1:36pm
Congratulations to your daughter!!!

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Tue, 04-02-2013 - 4:26pm

The terms are all pretty loosely defined, and they are relative to the stats of the individual. A school that lets in fewer than 50% of applicants might be a safety for one kid, but a match for another. There are, however, schools that are reaches for everyone, no matter how good their grades and scores, because of the number of applicants and the low acceptance rates. These would be schools like the eight Ivies, Stanford, NYU, U of Chicago, the top liberal arts schools, etc.

And there are financial safeties, too, schools where the applicant is likely to get in and to receive the aid he/she needs to pay for it. If you get in and can't afford to go, it's not really a safety.

Avatar for mahopac
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-24-1997
Wed, 04-03-2013 - 11:47am

We spent last night with DD and a couple of her friends going to dinner & a concert.  A big part of the discussion was the lack of acceptances to top universities among the top students in their graduating class.  MIT continued its 10-year trend of not accepting anyone from our school (a couple of years ago they rejected one of our students who had won a major international science competition and had corresponding test scores).  The only Ivy that accepted *any* of our students this year was Cornell. There is another public school near us that despite being a top, affluent district has never had a student accepted to Princeton.  The competition is ridiculous.

In fact, the whole business of getting into college is kind of ridiculous.  I have a special concern over students who don't even know that they *can* apply to private colleges or have any idea of the options that are out there.  We have friends whose kids are super-smart but the parents think it's good enough for them to just go to the local college, when they should be trying for top science universities (they're *that* smart).  DS hates that almost everyone at his LAC is from an affluent white or Asian family (his urban Catholic HS was much more diverse socially and economically).  Maybe someday when I'm not working so hard to send my kids to college under the current system, that will be a cause I work on.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 04-05-2013 - 4:38pm

D did apply to Stanford, but was rejected. She took it harder than we expected, because she had never said that Stanford was her first choice. I really think it was a matter of pride and thinking she'd be the one to choose, so this was a good life lesson.  (Of course, I don't get why kids with lower scores got in, but oh, well, the whole thing's a mystery to me!).

From the beginning of the process, she said it was clear that a small liberal arts school was best for her, and she wanted to avoid the hook-up and heavy drinking culture that is common on some campuses, so women's colleges seemed to be a good fit.  I know she'll end up in a good place, but she'd better decide before that deposit is due!

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 04-05-2013 - 4:40pm

DD is definitely planning to do a year in France, so she only has to be on campus for three years. That was my limit, too! But then you're ready to move on.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-13-1999
Fri, 04-05-2013 - 8:28pm

We live fairly close to Stanford and most of the kids in dd's school are gaga over it.  My sense of Stanford is that it's undergone some serious and, from my perspective, alarming changes over the past 5 years or so and is now seen as a tech/engineering school for entreprenuers.

http://alumni.stanford.edu/get/page/magazine/article/?article_id=57728

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 10:39am
ODD and I were talking this weekend about her BFF, she's in the top ten at our school of over 700 kids. She apparently has heard from one or two schools she applied for, but not really ones she wants to go to, she was wait listed for 2 schools, one was one of her top 3 choices and her other schools she has not heard from yet. I cannot even imagine still being so unsure of where you are going to school at this juncture because of not getting acceptances back yet. She's on the fence, her father knows someone high up at one of the local universities she applied to, she doesn't really want to attend there, but her parents encouraged her to and she has gotten several scholarships now to the school. She said its starting to get hard to wait out the other ones as she is responsible for tuition, her parents will pay room and board, and the fact that this local college is giving her more and more scholarship money which would obviously help her, but she really doesn't want to attend it.
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Avatar for mahopac
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Registered: 07-24-1997
Mon, 04-08-2013 - 2:08pm

I'm amazed she hasn't heard from some of the schools at this late date.  April 1 was the deadline for all the ones I knew about, and most sent their decisions early - the Ivies were apparently all on one day.  DD heard from the state schools within a couple weeks of applying back in December; mid-March from Brandeis and Boston College, and then the rest (NYU, Brown, Wesleyan, Vassar, Bard) the last week of March.  Her friend heard from Sarah Lawrence on April 1 and that was the last one among all her friends.