QOTW - Dress Code and Hair Color

Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
QOTW - Dress Code and Hair Color
6
Wed, 02-13-2013 - 9:41am

I saw this article today and thought it was interesting.  What are you thoughts on it?

In the past few months, schools have banned everything from yoga pants and Ugg boots to birthday candles and peanut butter sandwiches. But one Utah middle school is cracking down on hair color—even if the color in question isn't a garish blue or green but just a dark shade of red.

http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/utah-teen-kicked-class-because-her-hair-color-192700681.html

Photobucket
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Mon, 02-18-2013 - 4:57pm

I wondered the same thing. The only thing I can think of is that they got their windows washed and now the light shows the highlights better! I know that's when I can tell how dusty my furniture is.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-12-2003
Sat, 02-16-2013 - 9:14am

My neice goes to a charter school (its public not private but run a bit different then traditional public) its k-12 and they have no hair color AT ALL. Must be natural color. Also they limit how long a boys hair can be and even styles for both boys and girls they do not allow, no wiffles for boys. They are 10 times stricter then the catholic schools and prep schools. No make up not even base or lip gloss, no nail polish, no jewlery that is visable. I mean I am all for teaching kids how you should dress but there is a point that its over kill. For me hair is the one thing I will NOT freak over. It will grow out and grow back. Of all the things they can do to their body its the one that IS NOT perminate. Kids need an outlet for self expression. They are not robots as much as school officals may want them to be. Its only a distraction if you allow it to be. I'm all for dress codes but when its overkill it defeats the purpose. I work in a casual office but the younger the employer the more blurry that lines is getting. Just because you can wear jeans to work that doesn't mean you can wear the same jeans you would to a club or when you are doing yard work. Concert Tshirts and sports jerseys are great for the weekend but not really screaming respect me to your boss and I think this is one place where some time down the line the ball was dropped in teaching these kids what you wear speaks for who you are and who you want to be. Think colleges play a big role too. So imagine you have done 12 years in a school with a strict dress code and now you see its totally acceptable to where your PJ pants to class... I will say I can usually tell a catholic school grad because they are less likely to wear jeans often and when they do its a neat ironed pair with a button shirt or polo, but I have noticed that is less the case with younger employers even if they did have dress codes and I have to wonder how much being told what to wear and not learning to make the good decision is affecting their ability to make that proper choice when they are faced with a lax dress code???

My kids school has a dress code (its not enforced very well) school departments reaction is to get uniforms, but think that simply enforcing common sense dress code would benefit these kids more down the line then simply telling them wear x,y and z; have hear this way or that and thats it. Kids need to learn to make smart choices so they can as adults...

Photobucket
Community Leader
Registered: 07-26-1999
Fri, 02-15-2013 - 3:44pm

I understand needing to have a blanket policy in general about dress code and enforcing it.  My only question was, the story said she has been coloring her hair this same color all school year long, its now February, she so has been in school with this hair color for 5 months at least and no one, not any of her teachers, no one has said anything at all about it, which likely means it hasn't been a distraction up until now, so why now all of a sudden is it an issue that she has to be pulled out of school for?  If its a conservative community, and it was a distraction, it would have been brought to an administrators attention by now, not just the principal or assistant principal, whoever had seen it, in the light down the hallway at school.

Photobucket
Avatar for melissamc
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2007
Fri, 02-15-2013 - 2:00pm
I saw this story the other day. I thought her hair color was pretty, and can't see why they find it distracting. While I agree with dress codes to some degree, I think that schools can also go overboard with it. I'd rather see a teen having this hair color than wearing a really short skirt.

Photobucket

Avatar for turtletime
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-1998
Wed, 02-13-2013 - 3:34pm

I don't think that's a new rule. It was the rule when I was in middle school. K through 8th grade in district has has the rule against unnatural colors in hair dye outside of dress-up days. The girl pictured in the article would have been fine. That was the color my hair was naturally before I had children. In high school, the hair color rules go away. We've never heard any complaints and I do think it's a fine rule to have at the younger ages. Our overall dress code is pretty standard... no belly, butt, bust or underwear showing, No inappropriate slogans or advertisments. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Wed, 02-13-2013 - 12:11pm
Middle school dress codes tend to be stricter than HS dress codes, because that's the age when girls experiment with their inner slut, and boys haven't quite caught onto the idea that Axe and baggy pants are not substitutes for a daily shower and decent clothes. While I hate irrational application of dress code rules (and the incident you posted definitely appears to be an example of that!), I do feel for middle school authorities trying to deal with all this stuff. It really does have to be almost on a case by case basis. My kids' school, a 6-12 Christian school, has a dress code that says boys must wear collared shirts and girls have to wear skirts that go fairly near the knee and tops that cover the belly. They have to have natural hair colors, but a blue or purple streak or two is fine. The key is to be respectful, not provocative, and not distracting. When it comes to enforcement, they are much tighter on the middle school girls, for the reason I stated in my first sentence. By high school, girls are a bit more sure of themselves and their sexuality, so they don't feel the need to push the limits as much, and the boys have just become accustomed to wearing a clean polo shirt every day.